Il semble que les cookies ne soient pas activés dans votre navigateur. Veuillez activer les cookies pour garantir une expérience du site optimale.
Affichage des résultats 1 à 20 sur 20
  1. #1
    Date d'inscription
    avril 2011
    Messages
    40

    Post LOTRO on Linux: A Modern Guide (2019)

    LOTRO on Linux: A Modern Guide (2019)

    LOTRO on Linux has gotten much easier. Yes you're still going to do some command line typing, but the folks who make the WINE system for running Windows programs on Linux, WINEHQ, have come up with some predefined commands, so all you're doing is cut and paste. LOTRO runs fine in WINE 4.0, so you no longer need the old workarounds like PyLOTRO, hence the need for a new guide.

    I'm assuming you've already installed Ubuntu or Linux Mint on your computer, or had someone else do it for you. Other distributions are less helpful when it comes to running LOTRO, or games in general. I could go on for another page on the installation process, but there are other guides to installing Ubuntu and Linux Mint, some of which explain how you can install them on unused space on your hard drive and dual boot.

    These instructions assume you are starting with a vanilla installation of Ubuntu or Linux Mint.

    First, you need to have the newest version of WINE, v4.0. Ubuntu and Linux Mint are good distributions with up to date drivers, but for some weird reason they still ship with a very outdated version of WINE, v1.6, that will not run LOTRO at all. Fortunately, WINEHQ has all your commands ready to cut and paste, to install WINE 4.0 in your Linux computer.

    You will need to know the root (administrator) password for your Linux computer. If you installed Linux yourself, you probably know it already; if you didn't install Linux, talk to the person who installed Linux on your computer if they didn't tell you already.

    Also, for those who are unfamiliar with the command line, there is a command called 'sudo' which runs a single command as root and then quits. We'll be using sudo a lot, but although it does ask for your password initially, Linux temporarily holds onto your root authentication, so you can type several sudo commands in a row before Linux will ask for your password again.

    First, if you haven't done it already, install the 32bit architecture. We'll be installing a 64bit WINE 4.0 here, but 64bit WINE needs some files from 32bit WINE to run 32bit applications, and until SSG gives us that great new 64bit client, you'll be running their 32bit client. These files work with all versions of WINE, so we can do it first.

    This is your command to install 32bit architecture:

    Code:
    sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386
    Now we add the WINEHQ Repository Key, the way in which you get secure transfers between your computer and the WINEHQ software repositories. Two commands:

    Code:
    wget -nc https://dl.winehq.org/wine-builds/winehq.key
    Code:
    sudo apt-key add winehq.key
    NOTE: wget downloads files directly into the directory in which you are currently sitting. No need to change directories to the Downloads folder first with wget.

    For the next section, use the command associated with your version of Ubuntu or Linux Mint (Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu). Remember to include the little ' marks, they're important for the Linux command line commands. Only use one command, not all four.

    Ubuntu 18.10

    Code:
    sudo apt-add-repository 'deb https://dl.winehq.org/wine-builds/ubuntu/ cosmic main'
    Ubuntu 18.04
    Linux Mint 19.x


    Code:
    sudo apt-add-repository 'deb https://dl.winehq.org/wine-builds/ubuntu/ bionic main'
    Ubuntu 16.04
    Linux Mint 18.x


    Code:
    sudo apt-add-repository 'deb https://dl.winehq.org/wine-builds/ubuntu/ xenial main'
    Ubuntu 14.04
    Linux Mint 17.x


    Code:
    sudo apt-add-repository 'deb https://dl.winehq.org/wine-builds/ubuntu/ trusty main'
    Now we tell Linux to update its list of available software sources.

    Code:
    sudo apt update
    And now a word on Linux development of software. Linux developers generally maintain three stages of software for each software application: stable, development, and staging. As you may have guessed from the word stable, the other two are increasingly less tested. Fortunately, WINE 4.0 is the current (2019-03-13) stable version of WINE, so you don't have to venture into the wild west of software development just to run LOTRO in Linux.

    So this is the only command you need to run:

    Code:
    sudo apt install --install-recommends winehq-stable
    If everything installs without complaints, skip the next step

    The apt program may complain about missing dependencies, or software packages needed to run WINE. Each package name will be listed onscreen, so you can just type (replacing <package-name> with the package name>) to install the software package(s) WINE needs:

    Code:
    sudo apt install <package-name>
    Once the dependencies are installed, or if you didn't need to install any dependencies, you've got one more step before you can begin installing (or copying over from another machine) the LOTRO files. Get into the command line and type:

    Code:
    winecfg
    The winecfg application will create a special directory called .wine in your Home directory. This is the directory into which WINE will install any Windows applications, and where you will need to create directories to install LOTRO if you are copying files from an existing installation. In addition, winecfg will most likely find that you have not yet installed a Gecko and a Mono package, so say yes and install these packages.

    While the winecfg window is open, click on the Applications tab and note, at the bottom of the window, that Windows XP is the default version of Windows used by WINE. That pulldown menu includes a bunch of other versions of Windows which you will probably not use, but you may end up coming back here later to change this to Windows 7. Windows XP works fine for now, so no need to change the setting.

    Now we'll install the extra files WINE needs to run LOTRO, using a application from WINEHQ called winetricks. First, from the command line, install winetricks:

    Code:
    wget http://winetricks.org/winetricks
    If you're using some sort of built in Intel graphics, the next command installs everything you need.

    Code:
    bash ./winetricks vcrun200{3,5,8} d3dx9 corefonts
    If you're using a NVidia video card, run this instead:

    Code:
    bash ./winetricks vcrun200{3,5,8} d3dx9 corefonts physx
    Just answer Yes or OK if asked, these are all needed to run LOTRO in Linux.

    If you're comfortable with the command line, you can probably skip this next part. If you aren't, and you use the file manager/browser in Linux, directories in Linux which start with a period, like .wine, are hidden in the normal file manager view. You'll need to click on View in the top file manager window, then select "Show Hidden Files". Or just press Ctrl+H as the menu shows. This will reveal all your other directories that begin with a period, in addition to .wine, but you only need to concern yourself with .wine for now.

    Now you can see the file folder in which all Windows software will be installed. The subdirectory "drive_c" is where everything goes, and if you are copying files from an existing Windows install, you may have to create a directory called "Program Files (x86)" because we still don't have that amazing 64bit client. It will be easier to create this new directory in the file manager, the Linux command line needs some simple but arcane commands to put spaces and parentheses into filenames.

    If you run the LOTRO installer in WINE, the Program Files (x86) folder will be created for you.

    Running the LOTRO Installer in WINE:

    If you downloaded the LOTRO installer using lotro.com, most likely the file was downloaded into your Downloads folder. Chances are it will have downloaded somewhere else only if you change this setting in your browser.

    Go into the folder with the installer:

    Code:
    cd Downloads
    Then type:

    Code:
    wine lotrolive.exe
    Select Express installation. This will speed things up and WINE needs to find the files in the place it likes to find them.

    Now here is the point where problems may occur. If the installer stops functioning or crashes, just run the installer again. It shouldn't take more than two tries to get to the point where the massive download begins, and any problems installing should be over by then.

    Once LOTRO finishes installing, you have two more changes to do. LOTRO will have created two icons on your desktop, one with the Ring on it. Right click on this Ring icon, and select, at the bottom of the dropdown menu, Properties. In the center of this new window, you should see a long command line command. Click on this command line once, then use the arrow keys to scroll all the way to the end. SSG only uses LotroLauncher.exe now, not TurbineInvoker, and all TurbineInvoker does is run LotroLauncher.exe. Change TurbineInvoker.exe to LotroLauncher.exe, and you're all set. We're making this change to speed up running LOTRO, and to allow you to more easily use command line options later, as TurbineInvoker ignores all command line options.

    Remember that Linux is case sensitive, so to Linux, LotroLauncher and lotrolauncher are two different filenames.

    UPDATE 2019-03-15: The second change you will need to make to be able to use the LOTRO Store (if you don't use the store, skip this step, you're done) is that you will have to run the LOTRO Awesomium client. Even with WINE 4.0 the regular client will not load the LOTRO store. You don't have to change the shortcut, just the LotroLauncher config file, and you don't have to go back into the command line again (if you like the command line, use your favorite Linux text editor for the following).

    From the Ubuntu/Linux Mint file browser/manager, go to View and "Show Hidden Files", then go into .wine, then drive_c, then Program Files (x86), then StandingStoneGames, then The Lord of the Rings Online. Right click on lotro.launcherconfig, and select Copy, then right click anywhere in the file window and select Paste (makes a backup copy before editing), then Rename the (copy) and add .old to the end (or don't, see below). Now go back to the original lotro.launcherconfig, right click on it again, and select one of the Open With options, either Text Editor or Notepad (doesn't matter which one you choose). The configuration file will contain an appSettings section. As the last line in this section, cut and paste the following line:

    Code:
    <add authoritative="true" key="GameClient.WIN32.Filename" value="lotroclient_awesomium.exe" />
    Now save the config file.

    Since LotroLauncher controls everything from that configuration file, it is possible to have LotroLauncher load the backup copy of the original configuration file (the importance of backups!) and run the regular client as well from the same shortcut link. This means that you could have the full benefits of the main client most of the time, and then briefly switch clients to run the Store. To do this, rename the edited lotro.launcherconfig to lotro-awesomium.launcherconfig, and then rename the backup to lotro.launcherconfig. When you next run LOTRO, WINE will ask you for a config file, and select the configuration file for the client you want to run for that session.

    There you have it, LOTRO on Linux.

    UPDATE: Inside the LOTRO Client, be sure to change your Options in Graphics -> Display to Screen Mode = Full Screen (Windowed).

    P.S. I discovered too late that there's a Player Guides section on the Forums. I'll try to keep this one updated but I will definitely keep the LOTRO on Linux Player Guide(link) updated.
    Dernière modification par Webgiant ; 15/03/2019 à 12h09.

  2. #2
    Date d'inscription
    juin 2011
    Localisation
    Middle-earth
    Messages
    2 462

    Thumbs up

    This is so awesome !!!

    I have bookmarked this for future use. Thank You for putting this together !!!

    I'm still gaming on Windows 7, while learning Linux. Then when win 7 won't run well anymore (after 2020) due to 3rd party softwares dropping support etc (after microsoft does), I will switch to Linux if I can just get good at it.

  3. #3
    Date d'inscription
    novembre 2010
    Localisation
    CANADA
    Messages
    433
    Citation Envoyé par Webgiant Voir le message
    LOTRO on Linux: A Modern Guide (2019)

    LOTRO on Linux has gotten much easier. Yes you're still going to do some command line typing, but the folks who make the WINE system for running Windows programs on Linux, WINEHQ, have come up with some predefined commands, so all you're doing is cut and paste. LOTRO runs fine in WINE 4.0, so you no longer need the old workarounds like PyLOTRO, hence the need for a new guide.

    I'm assuming you've already installed Ubuntu or Linux Mint on your computer, or had someone else do it for you. Other distributions are less helpful when it comes to running LOTRO, or games in general. I could go on for another page on the installation process, but there are other guides to installing Ubuntu and Linux Mint, some of which explain how you can install them on unused space on your hard drive and dual boot.

    These instructions assume you are starting with a vanilla installation of Ubuntu or Linux Mint.

    First, you need to have the newest version of WINE, v4.0. Ubuntu and Linux Mint are good distributions with up to date drivers, but for some weird reason they still ship with a very outdated version of WINE, v1.6, that will not run LOTRO at all. Fortunately, WINEHQ has all your commands ready to cut and paste, to install WINE 4.0 in your Linux computer.

    You will need to know the root (administrator) password for your Linux computer. If you installed Linux yourself, you probably know it already; if you didn't install Linux, talk to the person who installed Linux on your computer if they didn't tell you already.

    Also, for those who are unfamiliar with the command line, there is a command called 'sudo' which runs a single command as root and then quits. We'll be using sudo a lot, but although it does ask for your password initially, Linux temporarily holds onto your root authentication, so you can type several sudo commands in a row before Linux will ask for your password again.

    First, if you haven't done it already, install the 32bit architecture. We'll be installing a 64bit WINE 4.0 here, but 64bit WINE needs some files from 32bit WINE to run 32bit applications, and until SSG gives us that great new 64bit client, you'll be running their 32bit client. These files work with all versions of WINE, so we can do it first.

    This is your command to install 32bit architecture:

    Code:
    sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386
    Now we add the WINEHQ Repository Key, the way in which you get secure transfers between your computer and the WINEHQ software repositories. Two commands:

    Code:
    wget -nc https://dl.winehq.org/wine-builds/winehq.key
    Code:
    sudo apt-key add winehq.key
    NOTE: wget downloads files directly into the directory in which you are currently sitting. No need to change directories to the Downloads folder first with wget.

    For the next section, use the command associated with your version of Ubuntu or Linux Mint (Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu). Remember to include the little ' marks, they're important for the Linux command line commands. Only use one command, not all four.

    Ubuntu 18.10

    Code:
    sudo apt-add-repository 'deb https://dl.winehq.org/wine-builds/ubuntu/ cosmic main'
    Ubuntu 18.04
    Linux Mint 19.x


    Code:
    sudo apt-add-repository 'deb https://dl.winehq.org/wine-builds/ubuntu/ bionic main'
    Ubuntu 16.04
    Linux Mint 18.x


    Code:
    sudo apt-add-repository 'deb https://dl.winehq.org/wine-builds/ubuntu/ xenial main'
    Ubuntu 14.04
    Linux Mint 17.x


    Code:
    sudo apt-add-repository 'deb https://dl.winehq.org/wine-builds/ubuntu/ trusty main'
    Now we tell Linux to update its list of available software sources.

    Code:
    sudo apt update
    And now a word on Linux development of software. Linux developers generally maintain three stages of software for each software application: stable, development, and staging. As you may have guessed from the word stable, the other two are increasingly less tested. Fortunately, WINE 4.0 is the current (2019-03-13) stable version of WINE, so you don't have to venture into the wild west of software development just to run LOTRO in Linux.

    So this is the only command you need to run:

    Code:
    sudo apt install --install-recommends winehq-stable
    If everything installs without complaints, skip the next step

    The apt program may complain about missing dependencies, or software packages needed to run WINE. Each package name will be listed onscreen, so you can just type (replacing <package-name> with the package name>) to install the software package(s) WINE needs:

    Code:
    sudo apt install <package-name>
    Once the dependencies are installed, or if you didn't need to install any dependencies, you've got one more step before you can begin installing (or copying over from another machine) the LOTRO files. Get into the command line and type:

    Code:
    winecfg
    The winecfg application will create a special directory called .wine in your Home directory. This is the directory into which WINE will install any Windows applications, and where you will need to create directories to install LOTRO if you are copying files from an existing installation. In addition, winecfg will most likely find that you have not yet installed a Gecko and a Mono package, so say yes and install these packages.

    While the winecfg window is open, click on the Applications tab and note, at the bottom of the window, that Windows XP is the default version of Windows used by WINE. That pulldown menu includes a bunch of other versions of Windows which you will probably not use, but you may end up coming back here later to change this to Windows 7. Windows XP works fine for now, so no need to change the setting.

    Now we'll install the extra files WINE needs to run LOTRO, using a application from WINEHQ called winetricks. First, from the command line, install winetricks:

    Code:
    wget http://winetricks.org/winetricks
    If you're using some sort of built in Intel graphics, the next command installs everything you need.

    Code:
    bash ./winetricks vcrun200{3,5,8} d3dx9 corefonts
    If you're using a NVidia video card, run this instead:

    Code:
    bash ./winetricks vcrun200{3,5,8} d3dx9 corefonts physx
    Just answer Yes or OK if asked, these are all needed to run LOTRO in Linux.

    If you're comfortable with the command line, you can probably skip this next part. If you aren't, and you use the file manager/browser in Linux, directories in Linux which start with a period, like .wine, are hidden in the normal file manager view. You'll need to click on View in the top file manager window, then select "Show Hidden Files". Or just press Ctrl+H as the menu shows. This will reveal all your other directories that begin with a period, in addition to .wine, but you only need to concern yourself with .wine for now.

    Now you can see the file folder in which all Windows software will be installed. The subdirectory "drive_c" is where everything goes, and if you are copying files from an existing Windows install, you may have to create a directory called "Program Files (x86)" because we still don't have that amazing 64bit client. It will be easier to create this new directory in the file manager, the Linux command line needs some simple but arcane commands to put spaces and parentheses into filenames.

    If you run the LOTRO installer in WINE, the Program Files (x86) folder will be created for you.

    Running the LOTRO Installer in WINE:

    If you downloaded the LOTRO installer using lotro.com, most likely the file was downloaded into your Downloads folder. Chances are it will have downloaded somewhere else only if you change this setting in your browser.

    Go into the folder with the installer:

    Code:
    cd Downloads
    Then type:

    Code:
    wine lotrolive.exe
    Select Express installation. This will speed things up and WINE needs to find the files in the place it likes to find them.

    Now here is the point where problems may occur. If the installer stops functioning or crashes, just run the installer again. It shouldn't take more than two tries to get to the point where the massive download begins, and any problems installing should be over by then.

    Once LOTRO finishes installing, you have one more change to do. LOTRO will have created two icons on your desktop, one with the Ring on it. Right click on this Ring icon, and select, at the bottom of the dropdown menu, Properties. In the center of this new window, you should see a long command line command. Click on this command line once, then use the arrow keys to scroll all the way to the end. SSG only uses LotroLauncher.exe now, not TurbineInvoker, and all TurbineInvoker does is run LotroLauncher.exe. Change TurbineInvoker.exe to LotroLauncher.exe, and you're all set. We're making this change to speed up running LOTRO, and to allow you to more easily use command line options later, as TurbineInvoker ignores all command line options.

    Remember that Linux is case sensitive, so to Linux, LotroLauncher and lotrolauncher are two different filenames.

    There you have it, LOTRO on Linux.


    What about the issue of the LOTRO Store not being able to run in-game ? Please add configuration steps for Store also. (is this an nVidia only issue ?)
    Elquasso - HNT | Hendunaron - LM | Laurealasso - GRD | Malenthir - HNT | Threk - RK | Tassels - CHM (all on CRICKHOLLOW)
    Farty - GRD | Elquasso - HNT | Stairlift - MNS | Chang - RK | Ripadoo - HNT | Kreskin - LM | Parchecko - BRG | Bumgrim - CHM (all on ANOR)

  4. #4
    Date d'inscription
    mars 2008
    Messages
    35
    Citation Envoyé par Lord.Funk Voir le message
    This is so awesome !!!

    I have bookmarked this for future use. Thank You for putting this together !!!

    I'm still gaming on Windows 7, while learning Linux. Then when win 7 won't run well anymore (after 2020) due to 3rd party softwares dropping support etc (after microsoft does), I will switch to Linux if I can just get good at it.
    Couldn't agree more!

    Webgiant, thank you!

    And Lord.Funk, yeppers, I'm doing the same thing and prepping for the switch from Win 7 to Linux when, you know, "that day" arrives. I, too, have bookmarked this thread.

    Cheers,

    Asterus.
    Another one bites the dust...

  5. #5
    Date d'inscription
    juin 2011
    Localisation
    Middle-earth
    Messages
    2 462

    Thumbs up

    Citation Envoyé par Asterus Voir le message
    Couldn't agree more!

    Webgiant, thank you!

    And Lord.Funk, yeppers, I'm doing the same thing and prepping for the switch from Win 7 to Linux when, you know, "that day" arrives. I, too, have bookmarked this thread.

    Cheers,

    Asterus.
    *thumbs up*
    "Arguing that you don't care about the right to privacy because you have nothing to hide is no different than saying you don't care about free speech because you have nothing to say." /Edward Snowden
    Never The Spy-Tool Windows 10 Who needs DirectX 12 anyway ??? Vulkan is better. :)

  6. #6
    Date d'inscription
    avril 2011
    Messages
    40
    Citation Envoyé par Elquasso Voir le message
    What about the issue of the LOTRO Store not being able to run in-game ? Please add configuration steps for Store also. (is this an nVidia only issue ?)
    I hadn't used the Store on the Linux Mint installs, so here's the UPDATE for the Store, and yes, we're stuck with Awesomium, but only when we want to use the Store (see below).

    UPDATE 2019-03-15: The second change you will need to make to be able to use the LOTRO Store (if you don't use the store, skip this step, you're done) is that you will have to run the LOTRO Awesomium client. Even with WINE 4.0 the regular client will not load the LOTRO store. You don't have to change the shortcut, just the LotroLauncher config file, and you don't have to go back into the command line again (if you like the command line, use your favorite Linux text editor for the following).

    From the Ubuntu/Linux Mint file browser/manager, go to View and "Show Hidden Files", then go into .wine, then drive_c, then Program Files (x86), then StandingStoneGames, then The Lord of the Rings Online. Right click on lotro.launcherconfig, and select Copy, then right click anywhere in the file window and select Paste (makes a backup copy before editing), then Rename the (copy) and add .old to the end (or don't, see below). Now go back to the original lotro.launcherconfig, right click on it again, and select one of the Open With options, either Text Editor or Notepad (doesn't matter which one you choose). The configuration file will contain an appSettings section. As the last line in this section, cut and paste the following line:

    Code:
    <add authoritative="true" key="GameClient.WIN32.Filename" value="lotroclient_awesomium.exe" />
    Now save the config file.

    Since LotroLauncher controls everything from that configuration file, it is possible to have LotroLauncher load the backup copy of the original configuration file (the importance of backups!) and run the regular client as well from the same shortcut link. This means that you could have the full benefits of the main client most of the time, and then briefly switch clients to run the Store. To do this, rename the edited lotro.launcherconfig to lotro-awesomium.launcherconfig, and then rename the backup to lotro.launcherconfig. When you next run LOTRO, WINE will ask you for a config file, and select the configuration file for the client you want to run for that session.

    There you have it, LOTRO on Linux.

    UPDATE: Inside the LOTRO Client, be sure to change your Options in Graphics -> Display to Screen Mode = Full Screen (Windowed).
    Dernière modification par Webgiant ; 15/03/2019 à 12h11.

  7. #7
    Date d'inscription
    avril 2011
    Messages
    40
    Citation Envoyé par Lord.Funk Voir le message
    This is so awesome !!!

    I have bookmarked this for future use. Thank You for putting this together !!!

    I'm still gaming on Windows 7, while learning Linux. Then when win 7 won't run well anymore (after 2020) due to 3rd party softwares dropping support etc (after microsoft does), I will switch to Linux if I can just get good at it.
    Bookmark this one in Player Guides, I will be updating that one the most.

    https://www.lotro.com/forums/showthr...24#post7922024

  8. #8
    Date d'inscription
    juin 2011
    Localisation
    Middle-earth
    Messages
    2 462

    Thumbs up

    Citation Envoyé par Webgiant Voir le message
    Bookmark this one in Player Guides, I will be updating that one the most.

    https://www.lotro.com/forums/showthr...24#post7922024
    Done and again Thank You !!!

  9. #9
    Date d'inscription
    février 2011
    Messages
    4 517
    Does the in-game store finally work properly in Linux, or is this still an issue?
    Moved from Riddermark to Arkenstone on 9/29/2015!
    -----
    Disclaimer: The definition of "Soon™" is based solely on SSG's interpretation of the word, and all similarities with dictionary definitions of the word "Soon™" are purely coincidental and should not be interpreted as a time frame that will come to pass within a reasonable amount of time.

  10. #10
    Date d'inscription
    avril 2007
    Localisation
    Oregon Country
    Messages
    6 218
    Nice guide! I got the game working with DX11 in SteamPlay Proton including the store working, but I broke that somehow installing wine-staging and and using Lutris trying to get Grim Dawn working. I haven't quite sorted out how Proton works with a standalone wine install and also how prefixes work.
    Centuries ago, in primitive times, before the dawn of civilization, there were things that would be inconceivable to us today; such things as poverty, disease, violence, senility, and love.

  11. #11
    Date d'inscription
    décembre 2010
    Messages
    58
    Citation Envoyé par maartena Voir le message
    Does the in-game store finally work properly in Linux, or is this still an issue?
    I don't know why it says the store doesn't work. It was fixed in the mid-3.x versions of Wine, first in staging and then in devel. I am running the normal lotro client binary and the store comes up without having to do anything special.

    Maybe it only works for some people.

  12. #12
    Date d'inscription
    mars 2015
    Messages
    2

    Getting wine to run lotrolive.exe

    The wine install failed first try due to operator error, but worked as expected the second try. Ubuntu 18.04 is pretty good for reinstalls.

    When it came time to run the command "wine lotrolive.exe", wine displayed an error that it could not find the file, wanted it in C/windows/system32, and putting the file there did not help.

    Easiest fix (I downloaded the file to regular Linux desktop) was to right click the lotrolive.exe file, select open with other app, and choose wine.

    6 GB download running as this posts, will see how it turns out.

    Many thanks for the guide.

  13. #13
    Date d'inscription
    novembre 2018
    Messages
    1
    Great guide.
    Is anyone else having an issue with lotro randomly crashing? The audio is still running but the video is totally stalled. I can Alt+Tab out of the application, kill it with "kill <pid>" or just Ctrl+C on the "wine LotroLauncher.exe" running in the terminal, but there are no errors to speak of.
    I have tried different versions of directx (9 seems to be quickest on my underpowered machine).
    I have also tried running in windowed / fullscreen / fullscreen windowed mode.

    One thing that I have done is use the pylotro launcher to "patch" the files. I am thinking because it just runs in native wine I might have corrupted or broken some of the game files so far.. kinda a reach but still its something I am going to try (just installing the game through wine from start to finish).

    Anyway other than the above I am at a total loss and I was wondering if anyone else has experienced similar issues?

    Thanks

  14. #14
    Date d'inscription
    avril 2007
    Localisation
    Seattle, WA
    Messages
    62

    Almost works, DirectX problem

    This almost works. The launcher gets all of the screens and updates and then crashes. It gives the following error:

    Could not initialize Direct3D, Please ensure that DirectX 9.0c [Dec 2005] or higher is installed. [105]

    What did I mess up?

  15. #15
    Date d'inscription
    juillet 2007
    Messages
    243
    Citation Envoyé par SatinKnight Voir le message
    This almost works. The launcher gets all of the screens and updates and then crashes. It gives the following error:

    Could not initialize Direct3D, Please ensure that DirectX 9.0c [Dec 2005] or higher is installed. [105]

    What did I mess up?
    Not sure exactly what you missed, currently I installed the SteamOS to my gaming PC. I went to "options" Selected "Steam play" and checked the Box that said "enable testing features of games to steam play". to which installed proton 4.2. I then installed LOTRO and I am currently over 50% of downloading .dat files. it is a lengthy amount of time but I suggest waiting for me to see how the game performs first. I did Not install the extra 6gb of files regarding DX11 but if you do not find a solution, and I have the game run with the store functioning it could be an option. The reason being it is quite a lot easier of an install. No terminal coding required. just a thought

  16. #16
    Date d'inscription
    janvier 2011
    Messages
    34
    Thanks so much for this guide. Confirmed it works on Debian Stretch, too.

  17. #17
    Date d'inscription
    février 2011
    Messages
    4 517
    Just curious.... has anyone tested this with the Bullroarer 64bit client?

    In theory, I don't see any reason why 64bit programs wouldn't work in wine, but just out of curiosity, and whether it changes anything.
    Moved from Riddermark to Arkenstone on 9/29/2015!
    -----
    Disclaimer: The definition of "Soon™" is based solely on SSG's interpretation of the word, and all similarities with dictionary definitions of the word "Soon™" are purely coincidental and should not be interpreted as a time frame that will come to pass within a reasonable amount of time.

  18. #18
    Date d'inscription
    janvier 2011
    Messages
    34
    Citation Envoyé par SatinKnight Voir le message
    This almost works. The launcher gets all of the screens and updates and then crashes. It gives the following error:

    Could not initialize Direct3D, Please ensure that DirectX 9.0c [Dec 2005] or higher is installed. [105]

    What did I mess up?
    Maybe this guide will help. I used it to install DirectX9c in Wine version 4.0.1. My linux is Debian 9.9 so it should work for Ubuntu 18, and other Debian flavors.
    https://www.dedoimedo.com/games/wine-directx.html

  19. #19
    Date d'inscription
    mars 2019
    Localisation
    "Great Britain" a colony of the EUSSR
    Messages
    17
    No luck for me. Followed the instructions on a fresh Ubuntu 18.04 and got "input not supported" as soon as the game goes fullscreen.

  20. #20
    Date d'inscription
    janvier 2011
    Messages
    34
    Citation Envoyé par Moorsbane Voir le message
    No luck for me. Followed the instructions on a fresh Ubuntu 18.04 and got "input not supported" as soon as the game goes fullscreen.
    This error is probably caused by the video resolution. DirectX is saying the resolution isn't supported by the monitor. I would open UserPreferences.ini, found in Wine's My Documents, change the resolution to something small, like 1024x768. If that works, then work up to a higher resolution.

    For example, on my system the path to this file is '~/.wine/drive_c/users/tony/My Documents/The Lord of the Rings Online/UserPreferences.ini'

 

 

Règles de messages

  • Vous ne pouvez pas créer de nouvelles discussions
  • Vous ne pouvez pas envoyer des réponses
  • Vous ne pouvez pas envoyer des pièces jointes
  • Vous ne pouvez pas modifier vos messages
  •  

La session de ce formulaire a expiré. Vous devez recharger la page.

Recharger