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Thread: SSD for lotro?

  1. #1
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    SSD for lotro?

    Hello there,
    As the title applies, i am curious as for wether a ssd helps with lag issues in Lotro.
    I am playing on a european server and my pc, as most, is good enough for lotro, yet still, especially in later areas, i experience rough lag and overheard that a ssd might help.
    What are your opinions and has anyone tried it? What have your experiences been?
    thanks in advance!
    greetings

  2. #2
    The SSD will help you with loading time. Think on of the best things to improve you PC. But the Lags are created serversides and you cant improve that with an SSD in you PC.
    If you switch locations, you will be faster, because textures of that area are on your PC and get loaded faster.

    As i bought my first SSD i only installed LOTRO on that. the Performance was good, but not so great as i wished.
    My loading time was much faster as i enter instances, as most of my friends.
    That was nice, but in reality you wait for all, before advance in an instance :-)

    Later i installed both, the system and the Games i play on the SSD.
    That let you PC start faster, open Programms much faster and let gamest start faster and the important stays: if the game has to load textures, that will be much faster. this type of "lags" will be solved.

    Think i have in most of my PCs SSDs and still think that are the best invest i had done.

    Mulitboxing, or better starting more as one instance of the game the same time.
    In the past i had an installation for each instance i want to open on an different HDD.
    Now i start all from the same SSD, the loading time is still faster as from different HDDs.
    That is a special useage, but still nice to know.

    TLTR
    Buy one, that will let you play smoother, but does not solve the Serverproblem.

  3. #3
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    There is a world prior to installing an SSD for gaming, and a world afterwards. Using an SSD for LOTRO (or any other game, really) will make load screens super-quick, and make log in significantly faster. Highly recommended!
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  4. #4
    It is also very helpful if you have many characters and want to switch between them fast. SSD is the best investment for a PC that helps open the programs and the computer itself like 1000 times faster. Also SSD does not get warm as it has stable temperatures. Even though SSD are more expensive i would highly recommended.

    +1 from me to prioritize SSD to your next PC upgrade.
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  5. #5
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    If your motherboard is able to handle a M.2 drive, and you can afford one (they're a little pricier than a regular SSD), go with one of those, they're even faster than SSDs for read/write operations and not by a small amount.
    Originally Posted by Damian6988
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  6. #6
    Actually, about any SSD will do.

    In practice, you'll note little difference between them, and there is a reason for that. Fast SSDs only reach their max speed when there are many simultaneous reads or writes going on, and that is a rare scenario on a PC or laptop. Real-world tests show little difference between a reasonably priced SATA item and a superfast M.2 one. In general, larger models perform better than small ones, up to 500 GB or so, because they can use more chips in parallel
    I'd go for a decent budget-ish one like a Crucial MX500, or something along those lines.

  7. #7
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    Red face

    Thanks for all the answers!

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Cordovan View Post
    There is a world prior to installing an SSD for gaming, and a world afterwards. Using an SSD for LOTRO (or any other game, really) will make load screens super-quick, and make log in significantly faster. Highly recommended!
    But prepare for time when it dies. I have one 64G dead and no desire to buy a new one.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Montezuma's View Post
    But prepare for time when it dies. I have one 64G dead and no desire to buy a new one.
    +1 this; I have had another SSD die. When they die they die totally and without warning.

    2nd SSD death in less than 2 years, neither more than 2 1/2 years old. In the same time period I have had ONE HDD failure, and that drive was 8 years old - not my oldest either!!

    The HOUSE PCs run 4 SSDs and 7 HDDs, none of the HDDs are less than 6 years old, and some are over 10 years old.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Montezuma's View Post
    But prepare for time when it dies. I have one 64G dead and no desire to buy a new one.
    This is true, unlike mechanical drives which tend to give warnings you can hear or experience when they deteriorate, SSD's are binary in that they work then suddenly don't. That's why I only keep games and Windows on my SSD's; no photos, videos, documents, etc. I have a terabyte hard drive for that stuff. That way, if/when the SSD fails, it's just a matter of re-downloading games after re-installing Windows, and little is lost for good.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cordovan View Post
    This is true, unlike mechanical drives which tend to give warnings you can hear or experience when they deteriorate, SSD's are binary in that they work then suddenly don't. That's why I only keep games and Windows on my SSD's; no photos, videos, documents, etc. I have a terabyte hard drive for that stuff. That way, if/when the SSD fails, it's just a matter of re-downloading games after re-installing Windows, and little is lost for good.
    It is the controller boards that fail; which shouldnt really be any different in reliability from HDD controller boards; there is something fishy going on.

    My oldest SSDs are about as old as LOTRO, and still going strong; it is the newer models that keep upping and dying; i do wonder if there is a common component between the brands causing the issue.

    Reason for Edit; spolling mishtake.
    Last edited by Yarbro; Aug 25 2018 at 04:54 PM.

  12. #12
    I've had a small SSD since 2011 for windows and a few other things (wasn't big enough for any games). Changed it for a 250Gb Samsung SSD earlier this year so have put LotRO on it and it does indeed load much quicker. Think I'm unlikely to buy a new hard disk again (other than for backup purposes, and my current 2 will do that for awhile anyway).


    Also got a second monitor 2 months ago so can finally play in 1080p rather than 1280x1024. Using 2 at once helps with my work, and a pinball game, not so much with other games.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yarbro View Post
    It is the controller boards that fail; which shouldnt really be any different in reliability from HDD controller boards; there is something fishy going on.

    My oldest SSDs are about as old as LOTRO, and still going strong; it is the newer models that keep upping and dying; i do wonder if there is a common component between the brands causing the issue.
    Yes, the hardware has changed over time.

    However, the main issue with any SSD is the same as with any Flash drive -- Flash memory has a finite number of WRITE cycles available - the controllers are trying to compensate for that.

    A good article on the subject is "SSD endurance myths and legends" at: http://www.storagesearch.com/ssdmyths-endurance.html
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Valamar View Post
    Yes, the hardware has changed over time.

    However, the main issue with any SSD is the same as with any Flash drive -- Flash memory has a finite number of WRITE cycles available - the controllers are trying to compensate for that.

    A good article on the subject is "SSD endurance myths and legends" at: http://www.storagesearch.com/ssdmyths-endurance.html
    I know all that, (thanks anyway), both the ones I have had fail were VERY low use; the one died at 2 weeks and less than 25% full, the other only 30% full, never mind worn out. In both cases, no swap file was set, as this wears them out faster - and is hardly needed on 99% of modern systems.

    I havent run a swap file on my main or back up PC in nearly 20 years, and there is only one on my daughters PC because she plays Project Cars, which wants 4GB of RAM, and her board only takes 4GB of RAM.

    In contrast, my 2 oldest, low capacity SSDs have plenty of wear, as they have been used, formatted and reused through multiple PCs.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Montezuma's View Post
    But prepare for time when it dies. I have one 64G dead and no desire to buy a new one.
    Of course you should. As you should with an HDD, as those fail too.
    Don't believe anyone trying to tell you HDD is more reliable than SSD or the other way around. Reliability has been roughly the same, on average, for years.

    SSD failures come in three flavors.

    1: Wear.
    An SSD has a limited number of writes, so in use, it slowly wears down. It is a fairly predictable failure, the drive gives out SMART data about it, and modern OSes keep an eye on that for you. When it happens, the drive becomes read-only, so data can be recovered without specialist techniques. A home user must do something very special (daily defrags? ) to get anywhere near that limit in 5 years.

    2: Damaged metadata.
    Any type of drive maintains an internal ledger of where data resides. It stores that on disk. If a system crash or a power failure occurs exactly on the moment a crucial part of that ledger is updated, the drive may become unreadable. Data will be lost unless you have access to data recovery services. The drive itself is ok, after reformatting you can use it without worries. (Professional or premium SSDs use a small 'battery' to avoid this issue. I know of no HDDs with this). Pretty bad error when it hits you, but not specific to SSD, HDDs have the same issue. Arguably more so, because they take longer to write.

    3: Sudden and complete failure.
    That's the nasty one, and SSD is down here. They don't fail more often than HDDs, but they don't give as much warning signs.
    Causes vary a lot. We've seen firmware issues, dying flash, soldering issues, dying capacitors, controller failures, and more. The good news is: his type of failure is mostly specific to certain items, such as a specific model, series or controller. And even better: they are getting more rare. So if you pick a popular model you're as safe as you could hope to be.

    Drive manufacturers have had reliability issues from time to time, and will continue to do so, in both markets. I owned the doomed OCZ Vertex SSD, as well as the IBM Deskstar 30 GB HDD, AKA Deathstar. Both types exceeded 20% failure rates. Happens to the small brands as well as the big ones, SSD and HDD alike. So the prudent way is to pick gear that's been popular for a while.

    And get that backup sorted out.

  16. #16
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    If adding an SSD presents special difficulties (like with a laptop w/o a SSD)...

    running LotRO from a USB 'stick' offers almost the same loading speed advantages without opening the case. A USB 'stick' may also be a bit less expensive and can be portable - a friend has a weekly commute for two days (family situation) and carries her LotRO USB stick with her to use in her daughter's computer.
    Be well and good questing, all! See you about Middle Earth another time!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boskone08 View Post
    running LotRO from a USB 'stick' offers almost the same loading speed advantages without opening the case. A USB 'stick' may also be a bit less expensive and can be portable - a friend has a weekly commute for two days (family situation) and carries her LotRO USB stick with her to use in her daughter's computer.
    Obvs a USB3 stick in a USB3 port is best, although a USB3 stick in a USB2 slot is still a lot faster than a USB2 stick in the same USB2 port. You need 32GB+ if you use the HiRez pack. (Below 1080p there is no discernible difference between standard and HiRez that I can see).

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Decoutan View Post
    Hello there,
    As the title applies, i am curious as for wether a ssd helps with lag issues in Lotro.
    I am playing on a european server and my pc, as most, is good enough for lotro, yet still, especially in later areas, i experience rough lag and overheard that a ssd might help.
    What are your opinions and has anyone tried it? What have your experiences been?
    thanks in advance!
    greetings
    An SSD will speed up loading times and it might help with some loading while moving in the world but the lag in lotro is mostly because of lotro game engine, not your computer or internet connection. We know that because even the people with GTX 1080 Ti and 100Mbit internet have lag. That said I would recommend that you buy an SSD, it will speed up lotro but also the rest of your computer. Btw, get at least a 120GB one so you can put windows and lotro on it at least.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ksenija View Post
    An SSD will speed up loading times and it might help with some loading while moving in the world but the lag in lotro is mostly because of lotro game engine, not your computer or internet connection. We know that because even the people with GTX 1080 Ti and 100Mbit internet have lag. That said I would recommend that you buy an SSD, it will speed up lotro but also the rest of your computer. Btw, get at least a 120GB one so you can put windows and lotro on it at least.
    The majority of lag is SERVER related, not game engine; it only got bad after the move from the original servers to the new "budget" ones a few years ago, the change was very noticeable, as the forum complaints from that time period show. I play on two wildly different systems, an ancient cpu on a fibre connection with ~85mS ping, and a modern system with a mobile internet connection and ~150mS ping; there is no difference in lag most of the time (it gets worse on the mobile connection when the weather is bad).

    Secondary cause is the game engine, due to its single core/single thread nature, and lack of gfx hand-off, and this usually manifests itself as stuttering, not game lag, especially when the cpu core being used overheats and throttles. This can be reduced by setting the game to use 1 or two cores that the OS isnt using much, setting a 60fps max target and reducing the gfx settings to medium high/dx9 (issues for NV gfx owners for dx9 though).

  20. #20
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    Samsung 250GB - haven't regretted it. Even came with a utility to transfer the OS from the old SATA drive to the SSD.
    It does require you to crack the cover and connect and disconnect drives so if you're not used to tinkering with the internals, find someone who is.

    Always a good idea to first make a backup of the old C drive first - either save the image to a secondary drive or to an external drive.

    Don't forget that an SSD has finite writes so you don't want to run drive speed benchmarks, defrag utilities or hibernation mode in Windows. If you do anything that captures data, FRAPS etc., you want to make sure you are capturing to another drive. You'd also want to set the scratch files for editing programs to something other than the SSD. (Assuming you are heavily into this.) There's a decent article here that explains most of this and has other good tips ....

    https://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-ssds...ease-lifespan/

    Ultimately you are upgrading to SSD to make your operating system faster. If you get any improvements to other programs, like LOTRO, that's a bonus.
    "You can't fight the Enemy with his own Ring without turning into an Enemy" - J.R.R. Tolkien, Letter # 81



  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuor66 View Post
    Samsung 250GB - haven't regretted it. Even came with a utility to transfer the OS from the old SATA drive to the SSD.
    It does require you to crack the cover and connect and disconnect drives so if you're not used to tinkering with the internals, find someone who is.

    Always a good idea to first make a backup of the old C drive first - either save the image to a secondary drive or to an external drive.

    Don't forget that an SSD has finite writes so you don't want to run drive speed benchmarks, defrag utilities or hibernation mode in Windows. If you do anything that captures data, FRAPS etc., you want to make sure you are capturing to another drive. You'd also want to set the scratch files for editing programs to something other than the SSD. (Assuming you are heavily into this.) There's a decent article here that explains most of this and has other good tips ....

    https://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-ssds...ease-lifespan/

    Ultimately you are upgrading to SSD to make your operating system faster. If you get any improvements to other programs, like LOTRO, that's a bonus.
    You should NEVER run a defrag program on a SSD, it is likely to kill it outright, SSDs have their own system built into the controller (newer defrag programs detect and wont run on an SSD, but older versions will try).

    LOTS of free transfer programs, I use AOMEI Partition Assistant, not had one bad transfer yet, and it does an awful lot more than move a partition for free, it can format Flash drives to FAT32 when Windows wont let you - right up to 2TB.

 

 

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