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Thread: Shorts

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milii View Post
    Next you will say that my concept of cookies is wrong, too. "Breeches" is British-English, not American English. Here there are shorts, short-shorts, and long shorts. We don't have prams or petrol here either. What you just said is the equivalent to me telling you to learn English and is quite rude.
    Au contraire, 'breeches' is American English as well. What you need to learn is some history.

  2. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Radhruin_EU View Post
    Au contraire, 'breeches' is American English as well. What you need to learn is some history.
    To an American a Breech is where you insert the bullet. Breeches just means you are the loader and the other guy is doing the shooting.

    Or it could mean the hole in the wall caused by the bullet.
    Last edited by Milii; Today at 03:03 AM.
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  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milii View Post
    To an American a Breech is where you insert the bullet. Breeches just means you are the loader and the other guy is doing the shooting.

    Or it could mean the hole in the wall caused by the bullet.
    Obviously you have never read any American classic stories; try Huck Finn.

    “Yes, and the very colors in them loud countrified Sunday clothes—plaid breeches, .."

  4. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Yarbro View Post
    Obviously you have never read any American classic stories; try Huck Finn.

    “Yes, and the very colors in them loud countrified Sunday clothes—plaid breeches, .."
    Tsk, tsk, tsk. And she claims to be a professor of literature and a published author

  5. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Langie View Post
    Tsk, tsk, tsk. And she claims to be a professor of literature and a published author
    I love how you people give me titles and careers at the same time. lol
    I would never become a professor. I look terrible in sweaters over blouses. And how I do look good in a sweater would distract the students too much.

    Quote Originally Posted by Yarbro View Post
    “Yes, and the very colors in them loud countrified Sunday clothes—plaid breeches, .."
    You had to go back a century and a half to find an American using the word. That's more than half the age of the entire Nation, so yeah it took awhile to break bad habits, bad language and even worse fashion. Plaid? Really?
    Last edited by Milii; Today at 07:28 AM.
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  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milii View Post
    I love how you people give me titles and careers at the same time. lol
    I would never become a professor. I look terrible in sweaters over blouses. And how I do look good in a sweater would distract the students too much.



    You had to go back a century and a half to find an American using the word. That's more than half the age of the entire Nation, so yeah it took awhile to break bad habits, bad language and even worse fashion. Plaid? Really?
    No, I had to do a 1 minute search on Google. As for plaid; even excluding various US golf pros, I have seen US tourists landing at Heathrow wearing MUCH worse; although the most derision I have seen aimed at a US citizens choice of attire was at Baiyun airport, Guangzgou, China, where a guy strode through customs wearing a bright green hat. (I spotted him and led the laughter).

  7. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Yarbro View Post
    No, I had to do a 1 minute search on Google. As for plaid; even excluding various US golf pros, I have seen US tourists landing at Heathrow wearing MUCH worse; although the most derision I have seen aimed at a US citizens choice of attire was at Baiyun airport, Guangzgou, China, where a guy strode through customs wearing a bright green hat. (I spotted him and led the laughter).
    Don't you know we dress that way while on vacation (and NOT "holiday") to disguise ourselves as Brits because 'When in Rome...' and most of the world was once a British Colony.
    We are very bad at disguises being so loving of Individualism which is Freedom's twin sister.

    Golf is a Scottish thing and there Plaid Shorts are a nod to the Kilts and another 'When in Rome...' thing.
    Making Brides Princesses Again!

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milii View Post

    ...

    You had to go back a century and a half to find an American using the word. That's more than half the age of the entire Nation, so yeah it took awhile to break bad habits, bad language and even worse fashion. Plaid? Really?
    You only have to go back a second and a half:

    https://www.doversaddlery.com/womens-breeches/c/1101/
    The Lag is so bad I saw Sara Oakheart outrun someone - kickman77

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  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milii View Post
    To an American a Breech is where you insert the bullet. Breeches just means you are the loader and the other guy is doing the shooting.

    Or it could mean the hole in the wall caused by the bullet.
    I’m sorry but I kinda have to disagree with you here. No educated American is going to think of firearms when the word “breeches” is used in a conversation about clothing.

    And when I say educated American, I mean your everyday average citizen.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, totally worn out & proclaiming "WOW, what a ride!"
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  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nymphonic View Post
    And when I say educated American, I mean your everyday average citizen.
    Alas, alas; those two terms form an oxymoron.
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  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by djheydt View Post
    Alas, alas; those two terms form an oxymoron.
    Sad, but true, and not just for the US; the level of knowledge and understanding of the world shown by many UK "citizens" is shockingly poor; although we can usually find our own country on a map :-p

 

 
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