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  1. #1

    Installing LOTRO on my new LINUX PC. Arggghh!

    I dread, really dread asking this question as the past five and a half hours of reading endless squabbles on the internet about how LOTRO can be run on Linux? - has proved frustrating and fruitless.

    I am NO programer or NASA scientist and since my Windows XP is no longer going to be supported my Microsoft after April 2014 I have decided to use Linux Ubuntu the recent version 12.04 LTS or something which supposedly has support until 2017. It has everything I need and I understood runs LOTRO via something called WINE a windows thingy for old microsoft programs.

    I know I know *sigh LOTRO runs best natively on Windows but it is possible to run on Linux indirectly. So say many others. I just would like to be able to do the same like many other families on a budget.

    Linux and Open source is a wonderful concept but for just a simple person who has no computer programming language knowledge (but willing to try to learn). Is there anyone just anyone who can write a simple list of instructions of how on earth to run LOTRO and who has done this recently on Linux so that others too who may want to enjoy Linux and play and spend money on LOTRO like they have done for several years on windows continue to do the same. Please.

    The frustrating LINUX language of #$- symbols and things is maddeningly complex to fathom out solo with only an internet browser to help and no one to ask questions. Linux is a complete change from Windows I know but it seems like a good thing, I can see the possibilities and LOTRO ought to be able to run on it.

    It's also annoying when you read smart replies like, 'You need to download that and then type this (insert hyroglyphics and numbers) add sudo???? apt-get blah blah and other peculiar Linux words' So off I go download things and then type it all in and nothing. Okay type it all in again. Nothing. Rattle the keyboard and type it all in yet again. Back to the internet page to write, did that and it didn't work. Only to be given a clever reply by someone who knows what they are doing and smugly happy about it (they're probably very pleasant!) to tell me to type something new in to see if that works. Doing this for several hours is just wearying.

    SO I have wiped my Lord of the Rings online game from my computer (16Gb!!!) and installed Linux. I don't really want to find my old discs and re-install Windows XP again (goodness knows where they might be...and not really even sure how now). Installing and running Linux WAS infact very simple. And quite pretty too.

    I just want life to be simple like everyone says Linux is - well on the surface yes sort of. It is until you want to do something that SHOULD be simple like install an old favourite game. In fact the only game I really enjoy. Why must I need a computer science course to load a game??? I haven't the enthusiasm for that and I have a career a world away from computers and also need to do chores and run a home! Others (most likely fashionable young things born with tablets instead of digital watches) seem to be able to do this but there is so much conflicting information on the web how to do this. Surely some kind soul in the LOTRO community who is good with computers can try doing this not just for me but anyone who wants to try linux and play LOTRO and write out the steps below to achieve this. Then at least the information will be clear and precise and here for everyone.

    At the moment as I have no access now to play the game I feel like just giving up. Goodby LOTRO. Do I really want to do that? Can I? I don't know. At least the frustration I guess would end. It'll be a sad day. And Turbine will have lost someone who enjoys the game very much. So I shall never see Helm's Deep I purchased. Oh well that's 'progress' I guess. 'I must think positively!!! I must I must!'

    I hope someone can usefully help everyone. Thank you.

  2. #2
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    Bumping to be sure OP's question gets visibility.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by soggykitten View Post
    since my Windows XP is no longer going to be supported my Microsoft after April 2014
    Just because it's no longer being supported it doesn't mean you have to stop using it if it still works for you.

    Quote Originally Posted by soggykitten View Post
    I understood runs LOTRO via something called WINE a windows thingy for old microsoft programs.

    I know I know *sigh LOTRO runs best natively on Windows but it is possible to run on Linux indirectly. So say many others. I just would like to be able to do the same like many other families on a budget.

    Linux and Open source is a wonderful concept but for just a simple person who has no computer programming language knowledge (but willing to try to learn). Is there anyone just anyone who can write a simple list of instructions of how on earth to run LOTRO and who has done this recently on Linux so that others too who may want to enjoy Linux and play and spend money on LOTRO like they have done for several years on windows continue to do the same. Please.
    I don't use Ubuntu so haven't tried this but here's a fairly simple set of instructions to follow.

    Quote Originally Posted by soggykitten View Post
    The frustrating LINUX language of #$- symbols and things is maddeningly complex to fathom out solo with only an internet browser to help and no one to ask questions.
    There's plenty of forums online for Linux, some covering specific distributions and others for Linux in general.

    Quote Originally Posted by soggykitten View Post
    Linux is a complete change from Windows I know but it seems like a good thing, I can see the possibilities and LOTRO ought to be able to run on it.
    It's only through the work of the Linux community that you're able to get it to run. Windows and Linux are totally different, even though they might seem the same when you're looking at the desktop. Without emulation, interpreters or a complete reprogram something that runs on one won't run on the other.

    Quote Originally Posted by soggykitten View Post
    SO I have wiped my Lord of the Rings online game from my computer (16Gb!!!) and installed Linux. I don't really want to find my old discs and re-install Windows XP again (goodness knows where they might be...and not really even sure how now).
    You should have left XP on your computer while you got used to the way Linux works. That way you'd have something to fall back on if there was something you couldn't do.

    Quote Originally Posted by soggykitten View Post
    Installing and running Linux WAS infact very simple. And quite pretty too.
    Ubuntu's known as one of the easiest to install. There's a number of Linux distributions (e.g. Gentoo, Linux From Scratch) that would make your head spin.

    Quote Originally Posted by soggykitten View Post
    It is until you want to do something that SHOULD be simple like install an old favourite game.
    The only reason it was simple to do on Windows is because it was made to be run on Windows. Getting something to run on one operating system when it was made for a completely different one is complex.

    Quote Originally Posted by soggykitten View Post
    Why must I need a computer science course to load a game???
    Because you're trying to run a game on a system it wasn't made to run on.

    Quote Originally Posted by soggykitten View Post
    Others (most likely fashionable young things born with tablets instead of digital watches) seem to be able to do this
    I'm 33 years old. I've been using computers for almost my whole life and even I have problems getting Windows programs to run on Linux.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by soggykitten View Post
    It is until you want to do something that SHOULD be simple like install an old favourite game. In fact the only game I really enjoy. Why must I need a computer science course to load a game???
    I think you do need to think a little more about computers in order to understand why you statement above is a little naive.

    Games, (indeed any program), is written to run under a specific operating system. You can't reasonably expect to change to operating system and then expect everything to run just as before. It is rather like moving house from the US to the UK and then wondering why all your electrical appliances no longer work. Some will, but many will simply blow up when they experience the higher voltage. The ones that are portable were specifically designed to be so. (One of my American colleagues once nearly set fire to a hotel when she tried to plugin some US hair straighteners to an Italian power socket.)

    There are ways of getting things to work, but they invariably involve recreating the interfaces of the original operationg system under the new one. Continuing the electical analogy, yoiu can use a transformer to change the voltage, but some things will still not work if they were depending on the frequency being 60Hz. Again, it is possible to get around this, but the solution becomes more complicated.

    Many years ago I owned a great car (an NSU Ro80) which was originally designed to have a Wankel rotary engine. A previous owner had got fed up with the maintenance it required and he had replaced it with a Ford V4 conventional engine. The car worked fine, some of the time. It was very hard trying to find belts which were the right length and because they were not designed for the odd mixture of engine and chassis, they tended to stretch and they needed replacing monthly. Eventually I gave up the unequal struggle and changed to a more conventional, but much more boring, vehicle.

    If you want to mix and match operating systems and applications, I'm afraid you are going to have to recognise that life is going to be more complicated. You need to understand something about the tools that you are using in order to obtain compatibility between them.

    If you want to keep things simple, upgrade to a newer version of Windows (I would recommend Windows 7 rather than Vista or Windows 8), or change the computer as well and switch to a Mac.

    I have been running Linux systems for years, and it is a fine operating systems, in many ways better than Windows or OSx, but I would never really recommend it for the casual user as a home system. I know that there are plenty of people who promote it as a suitable alternative, but I'm afraid I am not one of them. Linux is the platform of choice for those who like to have full control over their systems, those who like to tinker, and those who are confident getting their hands dirty. It is a great system for commercial and professional use, but I remain unconvinced that it is yet suitable for use by the non-computer literate home user.

    Quote Originally Posted by Total-MAdMaN View Post

    I'm 33 years old. I've been using computers for almost my whole life and even I have problems getting Windows programs to run on Linux.
    Turned 60, and have been programming operating systems for 38 years, and it doesn't get any easier!
    TANSTAAFL

  5. #5

    Thank you for the time spent writing a reply to my post!

    Thanks so much all of you for taking the time to read my post. Thanks too Southernbelle0927 for the post bump thingy that was very thoughtful!!

    I shall follow that link - Running Lord of the Rings Online with Linux - thank you!!

    Five hours I guess is too short I guess a time to give up on this, especially when everyone has so much experience.
    Don't worry, although I have no experience in Wankle Rotary Engines, I know NOT to plug in hair straightners in a foreign country and expect them to work first time.
    My PC back-up should repair my short fuse.

    I'm not one to give up as I still have, perhaps a jaded belief computers were designed to make our lives simpler. On the whole they do.

    If I do eventually get something to run on Linux I shall post here what I did.

    Thanks everyone for the advice and any future advice here that might appear.

  6. #6
    One thing needs to be clarified, "Linux" is really only a Kernel, that doesn't make an operating system yet.
    What we usually call "Linux" should be more correctly refered to as "GNU/Linux", because it is really based around the GNU project. The GNU project itself is what provides all the base of the Unix-like OS. (In fact GNU it even has its own kernel, GNU Hurd, and yes the Linux kernel on the other hand also gets used in other OSes, you may know Android for example)

    Though that still makes no modern desktop OS, and that's where the variations of the various Linux distributions come in. Different desktop environments are rather obvious to tell, different packet systems require different steps to install software, but even things most people never mess with can be based on different projects, like the init system that controls the whole boot process. And most of those components are independent projects that evolve, and distributions also reconsider their choices every now and then.

    Ubuntu is certainly one of the most popular distribution, but Canonical, the company behind it, tends to come up with non-standard solutions (e.g Upstart and soon Mir), and is not shy to make more drastic changes either (e.g. Unity), so guides you find out there for installing a certain application on Ubuntu may be long outdated.

    Anyway, with a basic understanding of the Unix heritage, things make a lot more sense in any Linux distribution, and even in other OSes, be it Mac OS X, FreeBSD etc.

    When we come to wine, it gets even more complicated. The Windows API is HUGE, and certain parts of it are not intended to be used by developers directly, and hence have sparse to no documentation. So a lot of things need tweaks. And again, wine gets actively developed, so guides outdate fast too, and while compatibility usually increases, there can always be regressions.

    Lotro is not really too much of a problem currently, the client itself now runs without any tweaks at all (wine 1.6.0 and later), unfortunately that is not true for the installers, they are a nightmare. The launcher is kind of hit or miss (okay that really applies to Windows too...), but there is an alternative Launcher that I gave some maintenance a while ago (see my signature), but that requires some additional configuration.

    The AppDB of wine has some more recent instructions, but parts of it are outdated again, and many things probably don't apply to your system, some are optional...
    http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManage...sion&iId=26934
    PyLotRO with Python 3.x support and bugfixes: [url]https://github.com/Lynx3d/pylotro[/url]

  7. #7
    I'm a long-time Linux and Windows XP user. It might be too late for the OP, but here's what I'd recommend:

    - If you're on Windows XP, you don't have to be in a big rush to dump it by April. First off, it wouldn't surprise me if Microsoft continued to issue security updates for a while. Further, there are ways to better secure a Windows XP system: run your day-to-day tasks as a Limited user account (that's what I do), keep your virus protection up-to-date, run script-blocking add-ons in your web browser (for example, Firefox with NoScript and Adblock Plus), keep strict firewall rules on the router between your PC and your internet connection, make sure Windows System Restore is keeping regular backups of your settings. And of course back up your important data.

    - If you want to try out a Linux version, install it with the dual-boot option on your PC, so you can go back to Windows XP if you need. This is also a good way to try out different distros without interrupting your main Windows OS usage. This way, I install and update my games under Windows. For some of them, including WoW and LOTRO, I've managed to build up my Linux Wine config files so that they point to the Windows partition for their data. I don't have to go through the process of installing and updating through Wine, but I can run the game on Wine without using extra disk space under Linux.

    Although Linux distros are doing a good job making the install process easier nowdays, I wouldn't recommend a casual user jumping to it for the sole reason of not wanting to run Windows, especially for tasks like gaming that take further configuration.

  8. #8
    Seriously, if I were you I'd try to find a copy of Vista or Windows 7 for your PC. Linux is great, in theory. It makes a great server platform when you have a team of server engineers who know how to manage Linux. For a regular computer user who is just trying to install and OS so that they can play games, Linux is generally a very bad option. Especially if you are fairly familiar with Windows.

    Linux can be relatively straightforward to use if all of the programs that you need are installed by default with your particular distribution (including Linux equivalents for Windows programs that don't have Linux versions). But if once you need to start installing more complex software (especially anything like WINE) you really need to be fairly comfortable with significant tinkering to get things working.

  9. #9
    Bumped to kill spam

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    bump..........

  11. #11
    Don't' feel bad. I've got a computer science degree, a masters in information systems and I'm a java services architect at a major health care company. I cut my teeth on MSDOS in the 80's. I did mainframe and OS/2 programming in the 90's. I've even had to do some basic linux command line stuff at work the last couple years. So don't feel bad when you can't get LOTRO working on Linux in a few hours. Because I had mighty mighty struggles with it.

    I had Monday off so I decided to install Linux Mint on an unused partition on my hard drive. I didn't hate it immediately (that's usually what happens when I install a distribution of linux) so I started to Google "Install LOTRO on Linux". I started following some detailed instructions. Turns out those instructions were written in 2009. I, at least, learned you have to install Wine and Winetricks and some Python (another programming language) application to be able to launch LOTRO. I must have read through 5 or 6 different Web sites all giving different instructions however, I somehow managed to get pyLotro to work. But once I would sign in I'd get errors. Oh, and I also installed steam which was another adventure but fixing those errors may have fixed my LOTRO erros. Eventually, for no reason I can explain I started trying to run the LOTROLauncher itself and after about 5 or 6 times of it hanging up loading splash screens it finally started. I also had to play around with the preferences.ini file. But, the graphics were set to the lowest setting and attempts to bump it up would result in my mouse not lining up correctly with the display. So it's working but the user experience is poor and I spent all day and into the night until I could get it all working but working poorly. I'll be sticking with Windows 7 to play LOTRO.

    Linux Mint though is pretty cool so far so I'm not quite ready to delete it yet.

    I tell you all this to say..... Save up $100 and get Windows 7 if you want to play games like LOTRO. There was another thread on here where people were pleading for Turbine to invest in Linux but the response was basically that it's not even remotely on their radar.

    I know that's not what you wanted to hear and it's unfortunate that you've already blown away your old version of XP. If I run across a good and more recent tutorial I'll post it here.
    [charsig=http://lotrosigs.level3.turbine.com/032020000003484e6/01003/signature.png]undefined[/charsig]

  12. #12
    Now that I think of it. I followed these videos pretty closely. They're old and there's one registry file download thing in it that just doesn't exist on the internet anymore. I tried to find it.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGWtQpcf4qw

    So that might get you started but probably will still not work.

    I also used this link

    https://sites.google.com/site/leesli...-lotro-in-wine

    Somewhere in the process of trying things and rebooting I was able to start opening the LOTROLauncher (an executable in the folder where the application was installed). That makes me think. I have a dual boot setup between Windows 7 and Linux Mint. From Linux I'm able to access my files from Windows. So one of the HOWTO pages I was following had me copy my The Lord of the Rings folder from Program Files (x86) from Windows to Linux. That's what I ended up doing and getting working. I couldn't get the LOTROStandard installer to work like in the youtube video above.

    If you have specific question or issues trying to follow these technical steps, post them here. I'm subscribing to this thread and I'll try and help if I can.

    Good luck.
    Last edited by Durgric; Jan 22 2014 at 11:02 PM.
    [charsig=http://lotrosigs.level3.turbine.com/032020000003484e6/01003/signature.png]undefined[/charsig]

  13. #13
    I have been playing LOTRO on Linux for 5 years now, and it is faster and more stable than it ever was on Windows.
    Its a well documented fact that some Windows games just run better on Linux, WoW is a god example and some of Valves titles, Left4Dead in particular.
    This speaks to the underlying efficiency of the Linux kernel and OpenGL.

    Installing LOTRO on Ubuntu is a very simple matter, if you do it the easy way!
    Get LOTRO installed, patched and running on a Windows machine first.

    Install PlayonLinux in Ubuntu: http://www.playonlinux.com/script_fi...inux_4.2.2.deb
    Create a new 32-bit bottle in PlayonLinux, call it LOTRO. This will add a PlayonLinux folder to your home folder, open it, then open the LOTRO bottle you just created, then copy over your Turbine folder from your Windows install.
    You dont even need the alternate launcher pylotro anymore, the windows launcher will work fine : launcher.exe

    Some very clear instructions here: http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManage...sion&iId=26934
    Last edited by jobcol2; Jan 23 2014 at 12:41 PM.

  14. #14
    As jobcol2 hinted at, it isn't really that running the game was difficult but rather that installing it is a hassle.

    For some general rules regarding the various how-tos that have been linked here...

    1. If the how-to you want to follow dates back to 2009 or somesuch, ignore it.
    2. If the how-to tells you to use winetricks, ignore it (see rule 1).
    3. Just get wine in a recent version and be done with it. And yes, you can also run the game with 64bit wine.
    4. If at all possible, make your life easier by copying an existing installation over to your linux partition. Your life WILL be miserable if you actually want to run the installers.


    Regarding the launchers, as has been pointed out, the QT based default launcher works. However, due to it having its share of assorted problems, you might still want to use pyLotro or my script.

    SNy
    LotRO on Linux! http://SNy.name/LOTRO/
    Also home to the LI progression diagram.
    Find the new forums unreadable? Try my forum theme.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mjk47 View Post
    I think you do need to think a little more about computers in order to understand why you statement above is a little naive.
    It is a little bit like asking why is it so hard to convert a Ford Mustang to run on natural gas. It's certainly doable but not something just everyone can do on a whim.

    As for games on Linux, maybe check out Crossover Games. It's commercial but not too expensive. Supports running quite a lot of Windows games on Linux and Macs. It's built on top of some free software but includes built-in support for many popular games to make it much easier for the non-expert to get stuff up and running.

    It's worth considering Windows 7. If the computer is too old then you may be stuck. If the computer is newer then really consider Windows 7 64bit, with more than 4 gigabytes of memory, it really speeds up the game a lot.

  16. #16
    Hang in there guy I have no computer experience and no help to offer but encouragement. I wish you the best of luck and a speedy install!


    Just curious what brought up the Wankle Rotary lol?

  17. #17

    Yay! I DID IT!! I DID IT!! Woot! I can play LOTRO on LINUX!

    Yay! I DID IT!! I DID IT!! Woot! I can play LOTRO on LINUX!

    Thank you all so much for the advice. I can't believe but I finally DID IT! It's great you all responded and kindly took the time to write helpful instructions. So hopefully if this helps someone new to Linux to install the game and run LOTRO or even encourage the already brilliant Turbine programmers who work on LOTRO - to wrench them away from playing LOTRO (probably screaming and kicking) and write a teeny little bit of code to install and run the game on Linux even more smoothly – more the better, then that would be wonderful!

    Well if any of this makes sense I shall be astonished but I shall have a go.

    This is how I installed LOTRO on my (I have been told old, pfft!) PC which is a 32bit machine if that means anything. The age of your PC shouldn't really matter as long as it isn't from the seventies but more importantly it should be able to run Linux 12.04 LTS (long term support version which is what I chose from the ubuntu.org linux site) and have a reasonable graphics capability. Earlier Linux versions I have read work too with LOTRO but earlier than version 10.0 of Linux may be asking too much of Turbine's modern game in 2014.

    You'll have to just read up on the specification for your computer and the Linux version you wish to run to check they work together. Even previously running LOTRO on Windows xp I had game settings set to low. You should back up everything valuable you wish to keep before installing anything on your PC – you have been warned. It might be wise if you make a back up of the LOTRO files on your PC to a portable hard drive or such like BEFORE you remove Windows and format your PC for Linux. Also have Windows Disks handy if you wish to re-install Windows after experimenting with Linux. But don't be put off I can play LOTRO on Linux at last! Yay!
    When you have Linux running and all that free space on your computer you can then re-install the LOTRO directories and folders from your personal backup far quicker than downloading the whole game once again. I believe if you have messed up then visit the LOTRO site to re-download the game and wait a VERY long time for 16gb! to fill your computer. Once you have LOTRO back on your computer you can then attempt to run the LOTRO installer which will function like it did on Windows and update files etc. and then ask you to type your account details to play the game.


    Just a note on Linux:

    It is an odd name but then perhaps Windows is too, just like Mac OSx. But Linux is a great OS and is free (its whole ethos), taking the name of its inventor. It is now developed by many collaborators around the world. These collaborators decide they like certain software, tinker with it, maybe develop their own and come up with colourful graphics styles and GUIs which they collect together and publish as Linux versions or 'flavours'. So you get creative names like Ubuntu, Linux Mint or Kubuntu or Debian or RedHat. The common part between them is the underlying operating system files Linux itself. So generally you can run all sorts of software across all the flavours of Linux. Some of these Linux versions are more popular than others but essentially they all have a similar feel and operate the same. The more popular ones are often improved more frequently and have developed a long track record of being efficient and stable over many years of use by many users around the world. I chose Ubuntu as I know it has a long following and used in many professional workplaces and universities alongside or instead of Windows. It has its ups and downs from one update to the next but so do other versions. Linux has many other extraordinary qualities too many to list here. The Ubuntu website ubuntu.com explains how to put Linux on your PC either alongside your current Operating System (dual boot) or as an entirely solo new installation erasing your previous OS, whilst reformatting your entire PC.


    The Steps:

    I downloaded Ubuntu Linux 12.04 LTS (Long Term Support) from http://www.ubuntu.com and burned that to a DVD.
    Ubuntu names its updates or releases and 12.04 is often referred to as 'Precise Pangolin' much like Google names releases of its Android OS like 'Kit-Kat' or 'Ice Cream Sandwich'... Hmmmn.

    • Firstly I backed up ALL my Windows LOTRO folder and files.
    • I then backed up all my other important files – (Get my priorities right eh!)
    • You can set up a dual boot to keep a windows installation but that is another topic.
      My choice was to ERASE Windows OS. So please save anything before attempting any installation of a new Operating System (OS)!
      Installed from my burned DVD Linux version 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin). Doing so formats my PC removing Windows completely.
    • Using the Ubuntu Software Centre I downloaded WINE version 1.6.1
      WINE is just a name for a program that allows some Windows programs to run on Linux. Downloading and installing WINE creates a hidden <.wine> folder in your home area and inside that it places a Windows like folder structure that contains a <drive_c> folder just like your 'C Drive' on your old PC. It also shows a <My Documents> folder and other familiar folders just like on Windows. In fact it should mirror the Windows folders needed to run programs. Any windows program you wish to try running MUST be placed within the appropriate nested folder. Windows is effectively simply stored on Linux like any other 'program'. To see and look inside the <.wine> folder you need to toggle Show Hidden files from the View menu on the toolbar. Do not rename any folder inside WINE.
    • Download and install the program Winetricks from the Ubuntu Software Centre.
      So did this too. I think it helps install some windows packages needed for a smoother installation of WINE. But hey who knows does Gandalf play sudoku?
    • Next I connected and Mounted my hard drive disk that had my 'precious' LOTRO backup.
    • Opened a Linux command entering window (the Terminal Window) with the command <Control> <ALT><T>
    • At the linux prompt you see something like,

      username@computername:~$

      I then typed

      username@computername:~$ winetricks

    • Then you press <ENTER> to run winetricks (something mysterious happens but no idea what, you may see text scroll through the prompt window, don't be scared). Next I typed in wine after the prompt.

      I typed in the command to run WINE and told it to run the Turbinelauncher.exe program like below. To tell WINE to run the correct .exe file I first located the LOTRO launcher file on my chosen mounted Disk and dragged and dropped the file directly into the Linux command window following the prompt and immediately following the wine command. This saves you typing in a long file address to point WINE to run the LOTRO launcher, like so:

      username@computername:~$ wine '/media/DISK ONE/Turbine/The Lord of the Rings Online/TurbineLauncher.exe'

      Now WINE is looking in the LOTRO back up folders for the correct file to run LOTRO.
    • Alternative I could copy the LOTRO folders and files into the WINE folder in the <drive_c> folder keeping the correct LOTRO file and folder structure as it was on the PC prior to Windows being removed. Any other backup file you kept should be placed in a similar nested folder within WINE. For example LOTRO user preferences, saved pictures or plugin data should be placed in familiar folders. Depending where you have installed or keep your backup of LOTRO files and folders the location may read slightly differently. Once I install my LOTRO folders to the main hard disk (in the drive_c folder in the .wine folder) the location may read like this:

      username@computername:~$ wine '/home/username/.wine/drive_c/Program Files/Turbine/The Lord of the Rings Online/TurbineLauncher.exe'

      It may well be best to install it to your main hard disk for speed performance (improved fetching graphics files) rather than getting WINE to read files from an external portable backup drive.
    • Once you press <ENTER> wine runs the Turbinelauncher.
    • I forget now as so much was happening but I think the Turbinelauncher may automatically direct you to a web address and prompt you download the Microsoft Visual C++ 2010 Service Pack 1 Redistributable Package MFC Security Update Not sure what I did, but did follow the link to the Microsoft site. Remember you are seeing Windows in a virtual experience through WINE and think the needed service pack downloads to the wine folder.
    • I am not certain but think my attempt stopped at this point as I got confused and didn't press the correct button to allow the package to download from the web browser. It was hidden behind one of the open windows I had on the screen. I quit WINE and then repeated myself at a new terminal window prompt. This was quicker as WINE and winetricks had already been installed.

      username@computername:~$ wine '/media/DISK ONE/Turbine/The Lord of the Rings Online/TurbineLauncher.exe'

    • Pressing <ENTER> Woosh you see a lot of SCARY, SCARY VERY SCARY text whiz z through the little command window reading things like fixme:blah blah blah failed etc. fixme:fixme:fixme:fixme:fixme: which is all disconcerting but eventually it stops and the LOTRO game launcher pops up. Automatically it updates the game recognising the folder file structure as it was on Windows before you wiped your disk and installed Linux.
    • When I first ran WINE there was a LOT of text and then things stopped sadly with the message:

      Game Error [129]
      Hardware texture compression support was not detected. This video card feature is required to run the game.


    • Googling for help I learned that I needed to download libraries for texture compression (a library is a program to help other programs run with correct information needed in turn to do their job). Linux does not have some software installed by default due to copyright issues. Texture compression libraries are needed for all 3D games. With libraries missing LOTRO believes drivers are absent because the game looks for S3TC support. Without the libraries, any graphics card will not advertise S3TC support thus the game halts with an error. Using the Ubuntu Software Centre search for libtxc-dxtn-s2tc0 and install it. Alternatively use the terminal window again and at the prompt type and run the following:

      sudo apt-get install libtxc-dxtn-s2tc0

    • Open the linux terminal again and as previously type:

      username@computername:~$ wine '/media/DISK ONE/Turbine/The Lord of the Rings Online/TurbineLauncher.exe'

      Then press <ENTER> at the prompt again to run the launcher.
    • At this point LOTRO game should pop up on your screen, install updates and prompt you in the familiar way to play lotro on your chosen server asking you for account details.

      Yay! You can play LOTRO on Linux!


    Running LOTRO actually works at last! I have only tried it at its lowest settings. It runs more smoothly full frame but not so smoothly when windowed. But hey that's okay. My graphics card is at fault as I don't believe my Radeon HD3xxx graphics card is being used to its best ability due to lack of support from Linux. I have yet to get the proprietary graphics driver I downloaded from AMD 'support' to run on Linux. That was a disaster crashing everything but I tried! Linux or AMD need to chat to one another on that one. Or maybe do a team building exercise and play LOTRO together. Perhaps Turbine could write a little program to help! (winks meekly)
    I think my next google search is 'Lotro Linux Audio Microphone Voice' as I could not configure Sound Options to use my microphone probably because I don't have correct audio drivers installed in Linux. I think I have to fiddle with sound programs ALSA or PulseAudio or JACK but don't really know how these linux programs work or what these do or how to install and set them correctly.


    Problems I would love to fix
    • Microphone audio to function.
    • Proper use of my graphics card.
    • I did find that taking screen pictures locked up the game as it seems ask me if I wish to to save the file and where. On windows saving pictures is automatic. I managed to save it but had to kill LOTRO by Force Quitting or closing WINE down (remember WINE is running LOTRO. Lotro is running indirectly on Linux!) I also re-set my screen display back to a higher resolution as LOTRO had been running in full frame when it crashed at a lower resolution. If you get into trouble you can just force quit and kill WINE.
    • Dragging LOTRO to another Linux work space at a different resolution size full frame really sent my computer to Mordor and back... that was a monster kill and a half...
    • Clicking on an icon on my desktop to run LOTRO would be nice.


    Please, please before trying LINUX back up your important files before removing Windows. LOTRO aside a moment, I have found Linux fun, stable, easy on the eyes, intuitive and I think where software should be heading. The only real problem has been understanding that the software is free and copyright software is of course NOT distributed with it. This might be a font you miss or a driver to make something run properly. A solution is only a Google away as the whole point of Linux is it can be adapted to make your life easier not locking you in to one particular software company. You can then be more creative and productive – so long as you can put down Lotro! Off-topic Libreoffice 4.1 the Linux word processing software actually opens my old 2003 mac word processing .cwk files at last. It is astonishing. I am so glad I stuck with this and got Lotro to run on Linux! Linux is fab! Thank you all the Linux developers. And thank you everyone who contributed to helping me here. And of course thank you LOTRO developers for an amazing game! (when it works lol! )
    Last edited by soggykitten; Feb 21 2014 at 08:50 PM.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    279
    Glad you got it working, nice to see someone so excited using Linux. I've been fooling around with various distros for a while. Fedora, Ubuntu, Mint have all had a turn lately. Valve have really put lots of dev time into Linux as a viable platform for gaming. I beta tested Team Fortress 2 on Steam for linux and the results were very good. Slightly better fps using my hardware but poor driver support for my mouse (a microsoft wmo1.1a so can't really object too much). Would be great to see LOTRO appear under games for Steam on Linux one day.

    Steam works great on Ubuntu and has lots of games you can run: http://store.steampowered.com/search...230_linux__202

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by soggykitten View Post
    [*]Then you press <ENTER> to run winetricks (something mysterious happens but no idea what, you may see text scroll through the prompt window, don't be scared). Next I typed in wine after the prompt.
    Running winetricks without parameters doesn't do anything at all, apart from showing its GUI. It's just a tool to automate installation of some software and setting wine options (dll overrides, registry keys etc.), but none of that is required anymore to run Lotro.

    Quote Originally Posted by soggykitten View Post
    With libraries missing LOTRO believes drivers are absent because the game looks for S3TC support. Without the libraries, any graphics card will not advertise S3TC support thus the game halts with an error. Using the Ubuntu Software Centre search for libtxc-dxtn-s2tc0 and install it. Alternatively use the terminal window again and at the prompt type and run the following:

    sudo apt-get install libtxc-dxtn-s2tc0
    Note that S2TC is NOT the same as S3TC, it is a patent-free compatibility library that can only provide lower quality results. If you want real S3TC, you need to download and compile the sources yourself, which apparently is already illegal in some countries due to software patents, hence there are no official packages.
    See: http://dri.freedesktop.org/wiki/S3TC/

    Quote Originally Posted by soggykitten View Post
    It runs more smoothly full frame but not so smoothly when windowed. But hey that's okay. My graphics card is at fault as I don't believe my Radeon HD3xxx graphics card is being used to its best ability due to lack of support from Linux. I have yet to get the proprietary graphics driver I downloaded from AMD 'support' to run on Linux. That was a disaster crashing everything but I tried! Linux or AMD need to chat to one another on that one. Or maybe do a team building exercise and play LOTRO together. Perhaps Turbine could write a little program to help! (winks meekly)
    "Linux" doesn't need to chat with anyone, the specifications for kernel and xserver are freely available to everyone. AMD just doesn't give a sh**.
    Don't bother trying to install AMD Catalyst. Even though AMD released one last Catalyst Legacy driver (13.1) a few months ago that supports your card, but it only supports ancient kernel and xserver versions, if you installed Ubuntu 12.04.4, your kernel and xserver are already too new, it simply won't work.
    At very least you'd be forced to downgrad xorg to the version of 12.04.2 and patch the kernel driver, but given the amount of problems people have with those Catalyst drivers, I wouldn't waste my time.


    Quote Originally Posted by soggykitten View Post
    I think my next google search is 'Lotro Linux Audio Microphone Voice' as I could not configure Sound Options to use my microphone probably because I don't have correct audio drivers installed in Linux. I think I have to fiddle with sound programs ALSA or PulseAudio or JACK but don't really know how these linux programs work or what these do or how to install and set them correctly.
    ALSA provides the kernel drivers. Ubuntu uses PulseAudio, which is a userspace sound server atop of ALSA. If you set wine to ALSA it will still use PulseAudio through a wrapper plugin (i.e. the application sees an ALSA driver, but in reality PulseAudio is in control of the ALSA driver and just redirects the API calls).
    Though I can't really help you with the ingame voice chat, I've never met a person that actually uses it. In TeamSpeak (which luckily has a linux client) you only need to select the proper input device.
    PyLotRO with Python 3.x support and bugfixes: [url]https://github.com/Lynx3d/pylotro[/url]

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    583
    I've been using Linux for years now in conjunction with Windows. On average, Windows uses 4 GB of RAM. On Debian Unstable, I've only ever seen it hit up to 1 GB max, other than that it's smooth at 100 MB with XFCE. I really think the devs should consider a Linux port for their game, simply because:

    A. The game already has an OpenGL port (it's on Mac OS X too)
    B. Linux needs more popular MMORPGs
    C. Turbine would benefit from it
    D. More sales

    If you need any help on Linux, there are loads of places to go for help including here if you want mine and others' assistance. Also, here is a thread for other Linuxers in anything game-related:

    http://steamcommunity.com/app/221410/discussions/

    Has plenty of threads to help you out. Good luck!
    [CENTER][I]Mephistopholes - Level 100 Champion (Focus: Tank)
    ~Never Alone~[/I][/CENTER]

  21. #21

    Lotro Audio and Linux Sound Set Up

    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx3d View Post
    ALSA provides the kernel drivers. Ubuntu uses PulseAudio, which is a userspace sound server atop of ALSA. If you set wine to ALSA it will still use PulseAudio through a wrapper plugin (i.e. the application sees an ALSA driver, but in reality PulseAudio is in control of the ALSA driver and just redirects the API calls).
    Though I can't really help you with the ingame voice chat, I've never met a person that actually uses it. In TeamSpeak (which luckily has a linux client) you only need to select the proper input device.
    Thank you so much for the knowledgeable tips! A quick update I am still using Linux 12.04 LTS and it all seems to be working okay via the linux downloadable Wine software. I checked my Linux software and it seems at some time or other I have downloaded through the software centre both ALSA and Pulse Audio. I haven't yet noticed any conflicts bewteen them running various Linux software. The LOTRO audio options for voice chat in game also works! Just last week I managed to somehow get the audio to work correctly. My internal PC microphone seems now to function correctly using LOTRO. Plugging in an external microphone also works giving me clearer sound which is great. So using LOTRO and the proprietory audio adjustments through the options does work after all Perhaps my ignorance of the inner workings of the PC sound overlooked the fact LOTRO sound was not the problem but my configuring of the basic Linux system wide audio settings.

    An external microphone plugs into the PC microphone jack and I checked that the Linux system Sound setting was set to Microphone Built-In audio and NOT Internal Microphone. The setting for output I left as Analogue Output Built-In audio. Having adjusted these settings the Lotro in game voice chat options seemed to work correctly. As it has been sometime since I returned to this post I can't tell if this was due to a Linux update or a Lotro update or just me fiddling settings, probably the latter. Audio needs to be adjusted with care as some sounds or recording may become inaudible or so loud that the microphone picks up the game sound and echoing feedback will occur. I found that minimising in game sound using LOTRO options so I can hear players speak and not have sound effects too loud gives the best conditions to adjust any headset/microphone to work with LOTRO. All a bit of trial and error as the quality of microphones will differ considerably between manufacturers.

  22. #22

    Lotro and Linux Crashes

    A few things I have noted that currently are problematic playing Lotro on Linux via the WINE software compatibility layer are:

    • Full screen pictures can not be screen grabbed without the game freezing and subsequently forcing a quit.
    • LOTRO does not work with the Linux workspace switcher. The game somehow minimises so small you can't even quit.
    • Default Screen Display size seems fickle. Sometimes logging on it returns to the last setting I had. Other times not.
    • Full screen size setting has to be set through options every time you log into LOTRO.
    • It is awkward to set the screen display size as the cursor position on screen is offset at every log on. Guesswork is needed to click on any check boxes particularly checking the full screen display Off at least once to windowed and then back On to full screen. Once the game is full screen cursor positions line up.
    • Setting LOTRO options to Low PC specifications the game runs slowly when windowed. Full screen however LOTRO seems to to run smoothly and perfectly well. This suggests to me the Linux GUI may be the culprit or Wine so I am forced to play the game full screen which is not always ideal.
    • Lastly it is worth noting that using the same PC but running LOTRO on Windows the game ran well at 1400x900 resolution. On Linux using Wine I am reduced sadly on my particular machine to run full screen at 1024x768 resolution. So it is all a bit cramped and non-antialiased but runs reasonably well on low settings

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by soggykitten View Post
    A few things I have noted that currently are problematic playing Lotro on Linux via the WINE software compatibility layer are:

    • Full screen pictures can not be screen grabbed without the game freezing and subsequently forcing a quit.
    • LOTRO does not work with the Linux workspace switcher. The game somehow minimises so small you can't even quit.
    • Default Screen Display size seems fickle. Sometimes logging on it returns to the last setting I had. Other times not.
    • Full screen size setting has to be set through options every time you log into LOTRO.
    • It is awkward to set the screen display size as the cursor position on screen is offset at every log on. Guesswork is needed to click on any check boxes particularly checking the full screen display Off at least once to windowed and then back On to full screen. Once the game is full screen cursor positions line up.
    • Setting LOTRO options to Low PC specifications the game runs slowly when windowed. Full screen however LOTRO seems to to run smoothly and perfectly well. This suggests to me the Linux GUI may be the culprit or Wine so I am forced to play the game full screen which is not always ideal.
    • Lastly it is worth noting that using the same PC but running LOTRO on Windows the game ran well at 1400x900 resolution. On Linux using Wine I am reduced sadly on my particular machine to run full screen at 1024x768 resolution. So it is all a bit cramped and non-antialiased but runs reasonably well on low settings
    Most of what you posted there can be helped (unless they actually broke it with HD, I haven't played since October) with setting it up with a virtual desktop in wine the size of your fullscreen resolution. This will keep the game unawares of you switching out and had been working fine for me all these years.

    Try these (obviously set your own resolution) settings:

    wine-command (see also my script, which has it like this)
    Code:
    $envVars wine explorer /desktop=LotRO,1680x1050 lotroclient.exe $args
    resolution-related graphic settings in UserPreferences.ini
    Code:
    [Display]
    Resolution=1680x1050
    Fullscreen=True
    AllowFakeFullScreen=False
    WindowedResolution=1680x1050
    AllowDesktopCompositing=False
    ConfineFullScreenMouseCursor=True
    ForceFakeFullScreen=False
    [... snip ...]
    Also, try F11 for screenshots, no need to screen-grab them.

    HTH,
    SNy
    LotRO on Linux! http://SNy.name/LOTRO/
    Also home to the LI progression diagram.
    Find the new forums unreadable? Try my forum theme.

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by SNy-lotrolinux-EU View Post
    (obviously set your own resolution) settings:

    wine-command (see also my script, which has it like this)
    Code:
    $envVars wine explorer /desktop=LotRO,1680x1050 lotroclient.exe $args
    Thank you so much for suggesting these things! That's wonderul

    What does $enVars do exactly? Before I enter the code (and my screen resolution) is it possible to return my PC linux set up to what it was before I enter this code, (should I even worry about that?!) Just in case something doesn't work as it should after entering this code what would I type to undo this &envVars? Forgive me if I am not expressing this very well as I am not too familiar with Linux code. I think I understand what you are suggesting which is great and my guess is if I quit Wine and exit the Lotro game all will be back to normal. Is that correct? So am I right believing I enter this code just once and it only affects the running of Wine? Lotro subsequently remains unaffected except while Wine is running? I don't really know how environment variables work and can only make a guess at what they do. Would I for example have to enter this $envVars code each time I want to play Lotro?

    Thank you for you screen grab F11 tip too! I shall try that at the next opportunity.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    2,277
    Crosslinking a guide.

 

 

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