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Thread: Female Nazgul

  1. #1

    Female Nazgul

    No I'm NOT saying there was one in the books by the Prof. However, a discussion was entered into on regional on the Landroval server during which I said ICE invented the names of 8 of the 9 (the Wringraith master being already named) and mentioned one was female.

    Here are the bits I've gleaned from the leystone (internet):

    The early Middle-earth Role Playing games (and material derived from them from Iron Crown Enterprises ICE) name the eight other (Nazgul) than Khamûl; Er-Murazor (the Witch-king, of Númenórean race), as :- Dwar of Waw, Ji Indûr Dawndeath, Akhôrahil (Númenórean), Hoarmûrath of Dír, Adûnaphel the Quiet (female Númenórean), Ren the Unclean and Ûvatha the Horseman, but none of these names come from Tolkien's writings. (Nor is there any indication that Tolkien ever imagined one of the Nazgûl as being female.)

    Source: The Encyclopedia of Arda. "What were the names of the nine Nazgûl?

  2. #2
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    Well, Tolkien did specifically call them kings and he was pretty good about differentiating between King and Queen with gender rolls, so I don't see how any of them were female.

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  3. #3
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    Three were said to be Númenoreans, one an Easterling (Khamûl, I think)... and all of them mighty Men, whether kings, warriors or sorcerers and kind. I can see where MERP came from, and given that Tolkien really didn't say much about what the Ringwraiths were before... eh, why not?
    After they became Ringwraiths all that they were before ceased to mean a single thing, after all. They were barely anything but extensions of Sauron's will; the Witch-King was apparently the only one with more than an inkling of autonomous thought.

    Curiously enough, he wasn't the Witch-King of Angmar before he became a wraith; Ringwraiths came to be after the year 1600 of Second Age, Númenor fell in the year 3319 of Second Age, Angmar was established in the year 1300 of Third Age.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Daeross View Post
    Three were said to be Númenoreans, one an Easterling (Khamûl, I think)... and all of them mighty Men, whether kings, warriors or sorcerers and kind. I can see where MERP came from, and given that Tolkien really didn't say much about what the Ringwraiths were before... eh, why not?
    After they became Ringwraiths all that they were before ceased to mean a single thing, after all. They were barely anything but extensions of Sauron's will; the Witch-King was apparently the only one with more than an inkling of autonomous thought.

    Curiously enough, he wasn't the Witch-King of Angmar before he became a wraith; Ringwraiths came to be after the year 1600 of Second Age, Númenor fell in the year 3319 of Second Age, Angmar was established in the year 1300 of Third Age.
    Yup, as the Silmarillion said...

    Those who used the Nine Rings became mighty in their day, kings, sorcerers, and warriors of old. They obtained glory and great wealth, yet it turned to their undoing. They had, as it seemed, unending life, yet life became unendurable to them. They could walk, if they would, unseen by all eyes in this world beneath the sun, and they could see things in worlds invisible to mortal men; but too often they beheld only the phantoms and delusions of Sauron. And one by one, sooner or later, according to their native strength and to the good or evil of their wills in the beginning, they fell under the thraldom of the ring that they bore and of the domination of the One which was Sauron's. And they became forever invisible save to him that wore the Ruling Ring, and they entered into the realm of shadows. The Nazgûl were they, the Ringwraiths, the Úlairi, the Enemy's most terrible servants; darkness went with them, and they cried with the voices of death. — The Silmarillion, "Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age", 346

 

 

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