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  1. #1

    Summarize LOTR if you wish.

    JRR Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings." [spoiler]On its surface LOTR covers the journey of a certain Fellowship of heroes who are on a quest who ultimately get stuck in a massive war between the "Free Peoples" (Freeps) and the Creatures who are governed by the evil Sauron (Creeps).



    Ultimately, it is a story of tolerance between the four fantasy races that make up the Freeps. At the Council of Elrond, various leaders from the allied Men, Elves, Dwarves, and some Hobbits meet to discuss how to dispose of the One Ring. Aragorn represents the Numenoreans and his ancestor Isildur had been heir to the King of Middle Earth. Due to pride, Isildur had chosen not to take the advice of the elf lord Elrond and destroy the ring immediately. This lead to his downfall, so Aragorn fears the Ring's power over whoever possess it or is around it.



    Yada yada yada... but anyway, at the Council, everyone bickered heavily against the other. Their alliance is tenuous at best. A key scene much later in the series is when the Fellowship meets the Rohirrim and Eomer threatens to behead Gimli as an off-hand jest. During their journey, Legolas the elf & Gimli the dwarf foster a quick bond & competitive relationship. It takes a great deal of trust on Gilmli's part to ride behind Legolas on a horse. And the two friends make promises to each other to teach & share something of their own cultures with each other once the war is over. Gimli admires the caves of Helm's Deep & Legolas likes Fangorn Forest.



    Many concepts have been crammed into LOTR by Tolkien. The often cited one of "Power Corrupts" which involves Gollum & the Ring.



    To put it succinctly, Tolkien believed LOTR to be his one shot at publishing a great story of his. He wanted to publish his Silmarillion (which he worked on for the majority of his adult life) but had been continually refused and his publishers demanded a Hobbit sequel. So he crammed and crammed and crammed references to Silm in the narrative from dialogue spoken by Aragorn and even in the appendices to the books.



    Years later, George Lucas would choose to film the fourth episode of a planned "Star Wars" series because he thought it was his only chance of making a movie in that franchise. It had a self-contained story which could be made longer with possible sequels. The situation was fortunate in that he had asked for and received full royalties for all merchandise related to Star Wars because the studio, Fox, didn't think any money could be earned via this means. Boy, were they wrong!



    After his death, Tolkien's youngest son (I think so anyway), Christopher, followed in his father's foot-steps. First by going to WWII while his father had served in WW I. Secondly by becoming a professor at Oxford College. And third by publishing ALL of his father's unpublished manuscripts along with scholarly notes within explaining the writing process that lead to each draft.



    If I may make an observation in already long explanation, Bilbo & Frodo both never married. The Ring stole from both of them certain aspects of life which conventions of their quaint of the Shire region had. Sam, however, did marry. [/spoiler]



    How'd I do?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by fack View Post
    The situation was fortunate in that he had asked for and received full royalties for all merchandise related to Star Wars because the studio, Fox, didn't think any money could be earned via this means. Boy, were they wrong!

    I never knew that about George Lucas.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, totally worn out & proclaiming "WOW, what a ride!"
    Continuing the never ending battle to keep Lobelia Sackville-Baggins in check

  3. #3
    Well, you did ask how you did.

    By the way, I don't think spoiler tags work in this forum.

    Quote Originally Posted by fack View Post
    JRR Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings." [spoiler]On its surface LOTR covers the journey of a certain Fellowship of heroes who are on a quest who ultimately get stuck in a massive war between the "Free Peoples" (Freeps) and the Creatures who are governed by the evil Sauron (Creeps).
    True, but getting stuck may not be the best term, as they would all, except perhaps Sam and Frodo, have been fighting in that massive war anyway had they not formed the fellowship.

    Ultimately, it is a story of tolerance between the four fantasy races that make up the Freeps. At the Council of Elrond, various leaders from the allied Men, Elves, Dwarves, and some Hobbits meet to discuss how to dispose of the One Ring. Aragorn represents the Numenoreans and his ancestor Isildur had been heir to the King of Middle Earth. Due to pride, Isildur had chosen not to take the advice of the elf lord Elrond and destroy the ring immediately. This lead to his downfall, so Aragorn fears the Ring's power over whoever possess it or is around it.
    Pride had little to do with it. A power that the ring had was to make sure that none who wore it could ever bring themselves to damage it. Isildur wasn't king of all Middle-earth, just Arnor and Gondor (which he shared with his nephew).

    Yada yada yada... but anyway, at the Council, everyone bickered heavily against the other.
    Um, what? I don't remember that. Glóin was briefly angry with Legolas, but the general arguing was a PJ invention.

    Their alliance is tenuous at best. A key scene much later in the series is when the Fellowship meets the Rohirrim and Eomer threatens to behead Gimli as an off-hand jest.
    Quote Originally Posted by The Two Towers
    'Then Éomer son of Éomund, Third Marshal of Riddermark, let Gimli the Dwarf Glóin's son warn you against such foolish words. You speak evil of that which is fair beyond the reach of your thought, and only little wit can excuse you.'

    Éomer's eyes blazed, and the Men of Rohan murmured angrily, and closed in, advancing their spears. 'I would cut off your head, beard and all, Master Dwarf, if it stood but a little higher from the ground,' said Éomer.
    I'm not sure how you got 'off-hand jest' from that.

    Quote Originally Posted by fack
    During their journey, Legolas the elf & Gimli the dwarf foster a quick bond & competitive relationship. It takes a great deal of trust on Gilmli's part to ride behind Legolas on a horse. And the two friends make promises to each other to teach & share something of their own cultures with each other once the war is over. Gimli admires the caves of Helm's Deep & Legolas likes Fangorn Forest.
    True, a key detail that you missed is that Legolas loved the Glittering Cave as well. Don't forget, the Elvenking's palace is essentially a glorified cave, as were the legendary elvish cities of Doriath and Nargothrond. Caves are not the exclusive residence of dwarves in LotR, the way they are in other fantasy.

    Many concepts have been crammed into LOTR by Tolkien. The often cited one of "Power Corrupts" which involves Gollum & the Ring.

    To put it succinctly, Tolkien believed LOTR to be his one shot at publishing a great story of his. He wanted to publish his Silmarillion (which he worked on for the majority of his adult life) but had been continually refused and his publishers demanded a Hobbit sequel. So he crammed and crammed and crammed references to Silm in the narrative from dialogue spoken by Aragorn and even in the appendices to the books.
    That sounds right.

    Years later, George Lucas would choose to film the fourth episode of a planned "Star Wars" series because he thought it was his only chance of making a movie in that franchise. It had a self-contained story which could be made longer with possible sequels. The situation was fortunate in that he had asked for and received full royalties for all merchandise related to Star Wars because the studio, Fox, didn't think any money could be earned via this means. Boy, were they wrong!
    Sort of, the '4' in the film's subtitle came IIRC from the fact that George Lucas once lived at Number 4 Skywalker Street. He had come up with a backstory, which he proceeded to change on a regular basis, which is why there are so many plot holes, but his first film was always the one he wanted to make.
    With regards to the money thing, though not entirely relevant, you may have heard of a rare-ish Star Wars book called Splinter of the Minds Eye, which was originally supposed to be the film's sequel, as neither FOX nor Lucas expected Star Wars to be a hit and were only going to give it a low budget follow up. They changed their minds pretty quickly.

    After his death, Tolkien's youngest son (I think so anyway), Christopher, followed in his father's foot-steps. First by going to WWII while his father had served in WW I. Secondly by becoming a professor at Oxford College. And third by publishing ALL of his father's unpublished manuscripts along with scholarly notes within explaining the writing process that lead to each draft.
    I think that's right but I'm not certain.

    If I may make an observation in already long explanation, Bilbo & Frodo both never married. The Ring stole from both of them certain aspects of life which conventions of their quaint of the Shire region had. Sam, however, did marry. [/spoiler]

    How'd I do?
    True, and in Bilbo's case at least, something I hadn't thought of before.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by fack View Post
    After his death, Tolkien's youngest son (I think so anyway), Christopher, followed in his father's foot-steps. First by going to WWII while his father had served in WW I. Secondly by becoming a professor at Oxford College. And third by publishing ALL of his father's unpublished manuscripts along with scholarly notes within explaining the writing process that lead to each draft.
    Sort of.

    Tolkien wrote LotR during WWII, and shared chapters in progress with Christopher by mail while his son was serving in the RAF in South Africa (where they had family connections). Tolkien in part wrote The Hobbit for his own children. Christopher was 8 years old when this was published. So his relationship with his father's Middle-Earth writings was intimate and personal. He also drew the maps for The Lord of the Rings. Tolkien lived into the 1970s. Christopher Tolkien is still alive, and still acting as his father's literary executor.

  5. #5
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    Good overcoming evil, and everything that happens in between. (Even Tolkien himself didn't like the pretentiousness of allegory and like that people attempted to shoe-horn his work into). He wrote for his children and did so by referencing ancient mythology and spinning it into a tale.

  6. #6
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    A man/woman comes from/into the world and finds things to do. Some of these things are remembered. LOTR is one of those things.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by fack View Post
    Yada yada yada... but anyway, at the Council, everyone bickered heavily against the other. Their alliance is tenuous at best.

    I think you might be thinking of the moviea there. There's a lot of discussion in the book to be sure but not much bickering if I remember right. Nor would I say their alliance is tenuous. Maybe a bit between Gimili and Legolas, and perhaps some with Boromir. The Hobbits at least know and trust Gandalf and Aragorn, I think Frodo trusts Gimli since his is Glóin's son. And Legolas... well who does not trust an elf?


    A key scene much later in the series is when the Fellowship meets the Rohirrim and Eomer threatens to behead Gimli as an off-hand jest.

    I don't quite think that was an "off hand jest" both parties were serious in their threats/


    Many concepts have been crammed into LOTR by Tolkien. The often cited one of "Power Corrupts" which involves Gollum & the Ring.

    I do not know that I would say "crammed" Since that gives the perception of too much being put in. There are a lot of ideas though, and very old ideas as well.
    Quote Originally Posted by equinoz View Post
    Good overcoming evil
    may be one of them. But at the same time good is less powerful then evil. Gandalf for instances says that "I am Gandalf the White but Black is mightier still" and other characters say similar things. If good wins then, as it certainly does, it is through luck or chance or even better through wyrd. Wyrd, and Old English word, is most often translated as "fate" though that does not really do justice to the idea. A better translation would probably be "providence".

 

 

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