We have detected that cookies are not enabled on your browser. Please enable cookies to ensure the proper experience.
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 37
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Barad-dûr
    Posts
    560

    Role-Playing a Rune-Keeper

    Role-Playing a Rune-Keeper:

    As the title suggests, in posting this thread I hope to better develop some basic ideas before role-playing a character of the Rune-Keeper class. My thoughts are primarily based around what makes a Rune-Keeper unique, and how that might lend itself to the identity of a character. In doing this I hope to test the ‘boundaries’ of the lore, without necessarily breaking them. I would like to hear others’ thoughts on the matter.

    According to Lotro-Wiki, Rune-Keepers are: Mystical linguists and masters of true names. Rune-keepers can heal in one battle and hurl destructive magic in the next. Inspired by Master Elf-smith Celebrimbor, whose skill with runes of power was unparalleled, the Rune-keeper wields powerful lost language to blaze a path of destruction or restore their allies' strength. In lore terms, the Rune-keeper marks the game's first true ‘magic user.’ ” The Rune-Keeper class is then compared to the Lore-master whose function is in “harnessing the traditional powers of nature -- calling down lightning, using water to make foes stick in the mud, or throwing a fireball made from a chemical concoction.” Of Lore-Masters it states that “the class is more of a combat chemist than a true magician.”

    It goes on, “The Rune-keeper, on the other hand, actually taps into the primal physics-altering powers of creation through "true names." It's the same kind of power (though to a far, far lesser degree) as that tapped into by powerful elves like Galadriel and Celebrimbor (who serve as the model for the class).”

    I am not sure what is meant by calling Lore-Masters ‘combat chemists’, because it seems that Lore-Masters’ skills are no less based on the primal forces of nature (primal physics) than Rune-Keepers’. Also, this term gets me thinking more about crafting vocations and primary professions than it does anything to do with class or skills sets. Incidentally, given Rune-Keepers’ affinity with words and for the power of language, I’m assuming players who are drawn to the Rune-Keeper class tend to choose the Scholar Vocation (alt characters’ crafting considerations aside). Is this a fair estimation? Continuing about the class itself though, might the Rune-Keeper’s abilities be thought of as related to ritual and incantation, if not prayer or calls to Elbereth*, words which draw their power and are spoken in the form of meditative chants? If written languages are based on oral traditions and are tools or symbols even, which point back to the spoken word.. the sound of it even, for me this would describe the basis for any approach to thinking about roleplaying a Rune Keeper. Ideas about creation, light and darkness, and being, might also be brought into that conversation.

    *“Calls to Elbereth are repeated as song, poetry, and cries of desperation, directed at the light-giving Star-Queen. Elves (and others, as necessary) turn to the one who brought the light to Middle Earth. As a symbol of hope and sheer goodness, it seems natural that Elbereth would be so important—not only to the Elves—in the fight against Sauron.. Prayer is indeed the last resort more than once during the quest to destroy the Ring. Frodo cries to Elbereth while facing the sheer terror of the Black Riders, and Sam is later bolstered against Shelob by the words of the Elves’ hymn to Elbereth Gilthoniel. It is almost a passive thing, a prayer of supplication which the two Hobbits experience in these darkest moments. Frodo “heard himself crying aloud,” (Bk I, ch. 11) and Sam’s “tongue was loosed and his voice cried in a language which he did not know,” (Bk IV, ch. 10) as if the intervention is provided both against the darkness and in the formation of the prayer itself.. When all else fails, prayer is offered as a final source of comfort, wisdom, and strength—and the potential for actual intervention. The light provides guidance to Sam in the deepest darkness, and it is through the light again that he realizes his own strength.. In the repeated cries to Elbereth, one witnesses again the real importance of light against the darkness of Sauron. Simply her name and the words of a hymn are used for a variety of purposes, ranging from lament to praise and of course supplication depending on the issue at hand.” ~ Source: Prof. Rachel Fulton Brown's “Tolkien: Medieval and Modern” at the University of Chicago, Spring 2011 (http://tolkienmedievalandmodern.blogspot.com/)

    There sometimes exists hesitation in accepting the Rune-Keeper as a lore-abiding class, and this seems especially challenging when thinking about role-playing one. Perhaps Rune-Keepers’ skills are taken too literally though. The lightning and fire and what-not that coincide with their abilities to channel the “Powers of Creation” could be understood as being in-game visual elements and cues meant for the player, not unlike other classes’ skills. That being said, perhaps what really makes the Rune-Keeper unique is a deep and disciplined belief structure that stands apart from any of the other classes, except save maybe the Minstrel who uses music. Unlike any of the other classes, the Rune-Keeper uses no weapons.
    Last edited by Breeon; Feb 10 2014 at 06:26 PM. Reason: further thoughts/emphasis

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    6,357
    Quote Originally Posted by Breeon View Post
    There sometimes exists hesitation in accepting the Rune-Keeper as a lore-abiding class
    Only sometimes? It was entirely fabricated for the game because of the perceived need for a 'real' mage class to meet user expectations; it's all about tropes from other fantasy - runes having inherent power and being tied to elemental magic, that 'true names' thing and so on. Fake as hell as far as lore goes.

    Perhaps Rune-Keepers’ skills are taken too literally though.
    Not if you look at the skill descriptions.

    That being said, perhaps what really makes the Rune-Keeper unique is a deep and disciplined belief structure that stands apart from any of the other classes, except save maybe the Minstrel who uses music. Unlike any of the other classes, the Rune-Keeper uses no weapons.
    In a setting where even Morgoth himself had need of a melee weapon (the original Grond, the Hammer of the Underworld) that alone is enough to mark the RK out as an intrusion of 'typical' gaming fantasy. The idea of a mage who needs no weapon other than magic is badly out of place here.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Barad-dûr
    Posts
    560
    Quote Originally Posted by Radhruin_EU View Post
    Only sometimes? It was entirely fabricated for the game because of the perceived need for a 'real' mage class to meet user expectations; it's all about tropes from other fantasy - runes having inherent power and being tied to elemental magic, that 'true names' thing and so on. Fake as hell as far as lore goes. Not if you look at the skill descriptions. In a setting where even Morgoth himself had need of a melee weapon (the original Grond, the Hammer of the Underworld) that alone is enough to mark the RK out as an intrusion of 'typical' gaming fantasy. The idea of a mage who needs no weapon other than magic is badly out of place here.
    You've made your opinion known but offer no suggestions or anything constructive. As a result, your opinion comes across as being completely dismissive. Sadly, I am forced to dismiss your opinion. Thanks but no thanks.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    6,357
    Quote Originally Posted by Breeon View Post
    You've made your opinion known but offer no suggestions or anything constructive. As a result, your opinion comes across as being completely dismissive. Sadly, I am forced to dismiss your opinion. Thanks but no thanks.
    Oh, I see... only interested in "testing the 'boundaries' of the lore" provided you get an answer you like. Well, tough - Turbine made up the RK to get people to play the game by giving them the 'powerful' mage they wanted, not because it's anything that really fits in with Middle-earth. Everywhere you look, there's something about it that's lore-breaking, be it the idea of runes being inherently magical (they weren't, an Elf invented them as a means of writing) or related to the elements somehow (again, no) or this supposed necessity to carve them into stones rather than something more practical like a staff (a rune-carved staff or wand being traditional for runic magicians). Or this business of not using weapons, when even someone like Gandalf needed to keep a sword handy. Then there's all that hurling lightning about (the skill descriptions make it plain it's 'real' lightning, not metaphorical). Stuff that lore-unfriendly can't be rehabilitated, only set aside.

    That's not to say you can't RP an RK, just that you can't make it lore-friendly at all readily because as-is it's anything but. In particular, the concept of a mage who needs no weapon other than destructive magic is entirely foreign to Middle-earth as a setting. It's certainly not the sort of RP 'plus' you were trying to sell it as.

    (And by the way, calling on Elbereth was like prayer, a plea for intercession or intervention by a higher power - that really has nothing to do with personal power and 'magic').

  5. #5
    If we look at Lord of the Rings as a historical account as Tolkien envisioned it, the record is the recorded events that the “historians” (Bilbo and Frodo) saw important to their story. Therefore entering into the world of Bilbo and Frodo and not seeing Rune Keepers (or powerful minstrels) just means they did not play an important role in the direct events told in the Lord of the Rings. (As well as the other stories told by Tolkien)
    The exploration of how Rune-Keepers (and Minstrels) can exist in Middle Earth I believe is a worthwhile task! And I believe Tolkien would have agreed:

    “Although now long estranged,
    Man is not wholly lost nor wholly changed.
    Dis-graced he may be, yet is not de-throned,
    and keeps the rags of lordship once he owned:
    Man, Sub-creator, the refracted Light
    through whom is splintered from a single White
    to many hues, and endlessly combined
    in living shapes that move from mind to mind.
    Though all the crannies of the world we filled
    with Elves and Goblins, though we dared to build
    Gods and their houses out of dark and light,
    and sowed the seed of dragons- 'twas our right
    (used or misused). That right has not decayed:
    we make still by the law in which we're made.

    Fantasy remains a human right: we make in our measure and in our derivative mode, because we are made: and not only made, but made in the image and likeness of a Maker.”
    ? J.R.R. Tolkien, On Fairy-Stories

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    6,357
    Quote Originally Posted by Louie View Post
    If we look at Lord of the Rings as a historical account as Tolkien envisioned it, the record is the recorded events that the “historians” (Bilbo and Frodo) saw important to their story. Therefore entering into the world of Bilbo and Frodo and not seeing Rune Keepers (or powerful minstrels) just means they did not play an important role in the direct events told in the Lord of the Rings. (As well as the other stories told by Tolkien)
    You could use that line to try to argue for almost anything, no matter how mad. No amount of that sort of pretence will turn LOTR into the sort of fantasy that features FRPG-style bards or mages.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Barad-dûr
    Posts
    560
    Quote Originally Posted by Louie View Post
    If we look at Lord of the Rings as a historical account as Tolkien envisioned it, the record is the recorded events that the “historians” (Bilbo and Frodo) saw important to their story. Therefore entering into the world of Bilbo and Frodo and not seeing Rune Keepers (or powerful minstrels) just means they did not play an important role in the direct events told in the Lord of the Rings. (As well as the other stories told by Tolkien)
    The exploration of how Rune-Keepers (and Minstrels) can exist in Middle Earth I believe is a worthwhile task! And I believe Tolkien would have agreed:

    “Although now long estranged,
    Man is not wholly lost nor wholly changed.
    Dis-graced he may be, yet is not de-throned,
    and keeps the rags of lordship once he owned:
    Man, Sub-creator, the refracted Light
    through whom is splintered from a single White
    to many hues, and endlessly combined
    in living shapes that move from mind to mind.
    Though all the crannies of the world we filled
    with Elves and Goblins, though we dared to build
    Gods and their houses out of dark and light,
    and sowed the seed of dragons- 'twas our right
    (used or misused). That right has not decayed:
    we make still by the law in which we're made.

    Fantasy remains a human right: we make in our measure and in our derivative mode, because we are made: and not only made, but made in the image and likeness of a Maker.”
    ~ J.R.R. Tolkien, On Fairy-Stories
    You bringing this to mind reaffirms the creative process. As for myself, in role-playing a Rune-Keeper (or a Lore-Master or Minstrel for that matter) I don't intend to rp that my character has the ability to shoot lightning from his fingertips. Its a little too much like the Star Wars Emperor for my taste. Fun to play, but something more strenuous to rp as a common or ordinary occurrence. Calling lightning from the sky in rare instances might be viable, but I wouldn't want to impose on other role-players standards or self-imposed limitations. As for the power of words and any act regarding creation, I'm playing my character as something of a religious figure.. though not dogmatically or in any zealous sense lest I become ensnared in the same spirit of unyielding vehemence as noted in earlier posts. Additionally taking from the RK class description, I've chosen to rp that my character uses no weapons. This works well with the ascetic style of my character, though it does make it a bit challenging at times when much of the dialogue taking place around him is related to war.
    Last edited by Breeon; Feb 10 2014 at 04:59 PM. Reason: ---

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    USA west coast
    Posts
    200
    I just see RK and LM as two sub-species of what Tolkien described as 'wizards'. For all the anti-RK people, think about it this way: There was a 'Necromancer'. Think for a moment on the classic definition of necromancer: someone who performs divination by speaking to the spirits of the dead. I'm not sure Tolkien meant that Sauron was posing as a diviner, exactly. He was a master philologist, so he surely knew the exact meaning of the word...right? Or was he just employing it off-handedly for atmosphere. I am guessing that the moniker was applied to Sauron early on. Before he became the Sauron we all know and loathe (or love depending on which side of the Ettenmoors we work) So 'lore' is pretty malleable from the point of view of JRRT and all the fans that come later. Maybe the Creepside should have a Necromancer class- a human who channels the powers of Morgoth from beyond the Doors of Night.

    So Tolkien's world was a work in progress and was, let's recall, envisioned as a series of literary works. Not the cornerstone for a FRPG MMO game. If the LOTRO designers take a similar stance, I can only support the approach. I love my RK and I do lots of roleplay with her, treating her as a sort of wizard. I'm glad they only allowed elves and dwarves to use the class, as they are the more magical ethnicities.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    6,357
    Quote Originally Posted by Breeon View Post
    I'm playing my character as something of a religious figure.. though not dogmatically or in any zealous sense lest I become ensnared in the same spirit of unyielding vehemence as noted in earlier posts. Additionally taking from the RK class description, I've chosen to rp that my character uses no weapons. This works well with the ascetic style of my character, though it does make it a bit challenging at times when much of the dialogue taking place around him is related to war.
    So you're doing the 'monk with mystic powers' thing in a setting which deliberately lacks such religious figures (nor, indeed, has any specifically religious figures at all) as well as being notably lacking in the trappings and ceremonial of organised religion. And where even the game avoids the usual 'religious' class stereotypes like clerics, druids and paladins, in consequence. And then you wonder why you attract 'unyielding vehemence'.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    6,357
    Quote Originally Posted by Aamu View Post
    I just see RK and LM as two sub-species of what Tolkien described as 'wizards'.
    What Tolkien described as 'wizards' were immortal 'angelic' beings who'd assumed the guise of wise old Men, and so what you're on about can hardly have anything to do with that. As for the 'Necromancer', not only could that term have been chosen merely for its sinister connotations but Tolkien picked it long before he'd had the idea that the guy wasn't just your typical fairy-tale evil sorcerer but Sauron, an altogether more significant and terrible figure and that in consequence, the tale was to be an epic firmly tied in with the world of the Silmarillion. When he wrote The Hobbit all that 'Lord of the Rings' business was years away, with a false start in between.

    And yes, of course there could be characters who'd learned sorcery from Sauron himself, because they're there to be seen in LOTR itself (the Mouth of Sauron, for example, and we know from passing mentions elsewhere that he wasn't the only one). But there's no making a player-character class out of that because they'd be on the wrong side, and this game is all about the player-characters being the good guys.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    USA west coast
    Posts
    200
    You're undermining your own broad argument by mentioning the Mouth of Sauron. We do have a "Creep" side where the player characters are the bad guys. Beyond this, however, Tolkien doesn't delineate how 'magic' or 'power' works exactly. How Melian weaves her shield is left vague. He was writing literature, not game design. So how magick works in Middle Earth is very much open to interpretation by the fans. One can choose to participate or not. I'd agree ultimately that the RK class seems a little cartoonish. (Just how am I not being mauled by those bears while I'm drawing mystical formulae in the air?, wearing nothing but a spiffy greatcoat?)

    A purist could easily construct a cogent argument that the whole game is anti-'lore' and offensive to true JRRT fans, to say nothing of The Man's great vision. But like Blind Lemon Jefferson, he can't be held responsible for what Jim Morrison does to his lyrics, for good or ill.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    6,357
    Quote Originally Posted by Aamu View Post
    You're undermining your own broad argument by mentioning the Mouth of Sauron. We do have a "Creep" side where the player characters are the bad guys.
    That's only in something that's a sideshow to the real game, and they're not fully-realized player-characters or even anywhere close to that.

    Beyond this, however, Tolkien doesn't delineate how 'magic' or 'power' works exactly. How Melian weaves her shield is left vague. He was writing literature, not game design. So how magick works in Middle Earth is very much open to interpretation by the fans. One can choose to participate or not. I'd agree ultimately that the RK class seems a little cartoonish. (Just how am I not being mauled by those bears while I'm drawing mystical formulae in the air?, wearing nothing but a spiffy greatcoat?)
    Where it's legitimate interpretation, yes. But not when it involves contradicting Tolkien and ignoring the style in which his tales are told in order to shoehorn in a 'mage' class that makes a habit of flinging destructive magic about with wild abandon. (Whilst being miraculously able to parry with those dinky little rocks).

  13. #13
    Without some creative interpretation the only way to "role play" inside middle earth would be to word for word "act" out the stories that tolkien himself wrote. So the discussion has to be on where is the line between stretching the lore (which every character created does by entering into middle earth that was not directly created by Tolkien) and actually breaking Tolkiens world. One area that is very important to Tolkien's world and sets it apart from other fantasy is that the Five wizards were in fact angelic beings whose opposites were creatures like the balrog.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    6,357
    Quote Originally Posted by Louie View Post
    Without some creative interpretation the only way to "role play" inside middle earth would be to word for word "act" out the stories that tolkien himself wrote. So the discussion has to be on where is the line between stretching the lore (which every character created does by entering into middle earth that was not directly created by Tolkien) and actually breaking Tolkiens world.
    Not really, if something blends right in then it doesn't have to stretch any lore at all. Lore's more 'things we know about Middle-earth' than that, it's not that proscriptive. (It's just not colourful enough for some!)

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    620
    One thing I would say after reading this thread and that is that we are not playing in Tokiens Middle Earth, we are playing in Turbines version of it. So as roleplayers we must adapt to what our characters see and experience. Then perhaps try to react how they would to such sights that Turbine have created.
    Khalis - A Captain of Imladris and Maethor of House Vanimar


  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Barad-dûr
    Posts
    560
    Quote Originally Posted by Khalis_Laurelin View Post
    One thing I would say after reading this thread and that is that we are not playing in Tokiens Middle Earth, we are playing in Turbines version of it. So as roleplayers we must adapt to what our characters see and experience. Then perhaps try to react how they would to such sights that Turbine have created.
    1. This is a game based on The Lord of the Rings/Tolkien's vision. It is something that stands apart from it. 2. This is a game. 3. Regardless of how some may feel about it, the Rune-Keeper IS a part of that game. Even for those who are only participating in this game because it is based on The Lord of the Ring's/Tolkien's vision, or were initially drawn to it for that reason, I would like to believe there are salvageable role-playing qualities about the Rune-Keeper class that point back to the written inspirational source.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    6,357
    Quote Originally Posted by Breeon View Post
    1. This is a game based on The Lord of the Rings/Tolkien's vision. It is something that stands apart from it. 2. This is a game. 3. Regardless of how some may feel about it, the Rune-Keeper IS a part of that game. Even for those who are only participating in this game because it is based on The Lord of the Ring's/Tolkien's vision, or were initially drawn to it for that reason, I would like to believe there are salvageable role-playing qualities about the Rune-Keeper class that point back to the written inspirational source.
    None of which does that 'monk' idea of yours much good, as that doesn't point back to either the 'written inspirational source' or the game.

    It's also no good going on about how it's a game when you insisted earlier on trying to bring lore into it, like the two are compatible when they are most certainly not when it comes to the RK. There's really nothing about it that's from the books.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Barad-dûr
    Posts
    560
    Quote Originally Posted by Radhruin_EU View Post
    None of which does that 'monk' idea of yours much good, as that doesn't point back to either the 'written inspirational source' or the game.

    It's also no good going on about how it's a game when you insisted earlier on trying to bring lore into it, like the two are compatible when they are most certainly not when it comes to the RK. There's really nothing about it that's from the books.
    I understand what you are saying.. "You can't have your cake and eat it too." You don't like the Rune-Keeper. You don't think there is a place for it. I understand and can appreciate that. I like the RK class. I like playing the RK class. If for rp-ing purposes I have to pretend he doesn't cause his opponents to combust into an unrecognizable mess, I am willing to do that out of respect for Tolkien and out of respect for other role-players. How I choose to envision my character though is of no concern to anyone else so long as I don't go around attempting to recruit other role-players into some sort of cultist secret order. I realize that organized religion is a subject that was not fleshed out by the books. It doesn't matter. In saying 'monk-like' I do not mean having anything to do with religion per se (which we are discouraged from discussing here anyhow), but am approaching it in a rather animistic sense. In any event, monasticism needn't denote religion. By implying a contemplative life, for one thing I mean sensitive to the environment even more so than the degree to which elves already are. I would think even you would agree that the lore is much fuller than to be limited to the trappings of role-playing about war. Nor is it so dull as to be confined to role-playing that your character sweeps a broom inside the Prancing Pony. I am not asking you to agree with me. But I certainly am not looking for a debate either. I just don't see it as a black and white situation.

    A portion of my character's bio:

    "... was born at Eregion during the Stirring season (S. Echuir; Q. Coirë), just between Winter and Spring in the year 755 SA. Naturally, he is a smithcraft though concerning the implements of war and bloodshed he became mostly removed since the time of The War of the Elves and Sauron, when his home, the capital of Ost-in-Edhil, was besieged and laid waste, and Lord Celebrimbor was also taken.

    In SA 1697, he was among those who reunited with Lord Celeborn and Lady Galadriel in what had become their new kingdom, Lórien of the Blossom. Diorn devoted himself fully to prayer and reflection over the next 1,000 years and much of that time he lived under a self-imposed silence. His academic studies excelled, but by SA 3430, ...at last broke his silence to take part in the War of the Last Alliance. Instead of returning to Lothlorien, however, he accepted an invitation to take up residence in Imladris and continues there to this day.

    Age: 2704 years (755SA to 3441SA = 2686 years + 18 years; TA3018 when the Fellowship sets off from Imladris)"
    Last edited by Breeon; Feb 11 2014 at 05:36 PM.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    6,357
    Quote Originally Posted by Breeon View Post
    How I choose to envision my character is of no concern to anyone else so long as I don't go around attempting to recruit other role-players into some sort of cultist secret order.
    You're the one who brought up the subject in the first place, and since RPing an RK is the topic of the thread, if I see something dubious about something someone's suggested then that's germane.

    I realize that organized religion is a subject that was not fleshed out by the books.
    'Not fleshed out'? That's pretty disingenuous... try deliberately omitted.

    It doesn't matter. In saying 'monk-like' I do not mean having anything to do with religion per se (which we are discouraged from discussing here anyhow), but am approaching it in a rather animistic sense. In any event, monasticism needn't denote religion. By implying a contemplative life, for one thing I mean sensitive to the environment even more so than the degree to which elves already are. I would think even you would agree that the lore is much fuller than to be limited to the trappings of role-playing about war. Nor is it so dull as to be confined to role-playing that your character sweeps a broom inside the Prancing Pony. I am not asking you to agree with me. But I certainly am not looking for a debate either. I just don't see it as a black and white situation.
    Monasticism is very much tied to religious observance; a monk is a religious ascetic. And when you first brought this up on another thread someone pointed out the contradictions inherent in the idea of that behaviour among Elves in particular, given the specifics of their nature, and that would still apply even if Tolkien hadn't deliberately chosen to severely limit the role religion plays in Middle-earth. They're supposed to be near-immortal, their relationship between body and spirit was different from that of Men, and they also knew exactly what awaited them if they died - that there'd be no spiritual transformation in the afterlife, they'd remain unchanged forever. Denying the world would be pointless for them as they were going to be part of it forever no matter what they did.

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Radhruin_EU View Post
    You're the one who brought up the subject in the first place, and since RPing an RK is the topic of the thread
    Great point. Since the OP was looking for ideas and help with RPing using an RK, why dont you offer some positive input on how that can be accomplished. You obviously don't like what has been mentioned so far and you are intent on replying so let us hear it. The RK is part of the game, like it or not, so I would like to know how you think one can be played in middle earth.
    Aut inveniam viam aut faciam

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    6,357
    Quote Originally Posted by DMagius View Post
    Great point. Since the OP was looking for ideas and help with RPing using an RK, why dont you offer some positive input on how that can be accomplished. You obviously don't like what has been mentioned so far and you are intent on replying so let us hear it. The RK is part of the game, like it or not, so I would like to know how you think one can be played in middle earth.
    It's been discussed before... the RK can be RPed well enough as a more traditional sort of runic magician, rather than with all the comic-book battle-magic stuff. Someone who can make use of runic spells (which were traditionally imagined as having to be painstakingly carved, engraved or incised into an item, like a wand or a staff* for example that the magician carried with him, and pronounced carefully to cast them) for less outrageous purposes such as divination, protection, concealment, misdirection and persuasion, and for making weapons more keen-edged or to be the bane of some foe. Have Elves have a bit more of a knack for it (because they're more 'magical') except where it's something Dwarves might be good at, given how they're generally portrayed.

    So there you go - not quite Tolkien but rather more in the spirit of things.


    *For portability. Stone was more for for permanence, when needed - going with traditional ideas, a Dwarf might carve a rune-spell onto a stone that he then placed with some treasure, so that there was a spell of concealment cast over it.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    USA west coast
    Posts
    200

    Red face

    Quote Originally Posted by Radhruin_EU View Post
    Not really, if something blends right in then it doesn't have to stretch any lore at all. Lore's more 'things we know about Middle-earth' than that, it's not that proscriptive. (It's just not colourful enough for some!)
    You know...there's a tremendous amount we *don't* know about Middle Earth. Which makes tendentious debates about whether something fits "lore" an exercise in subjectivity. It's interesting to banter about the RK class and how well it fits but there's no way to know what Tolkien would think about it. His son thinks any spin-off media based on any of the Professor's creations are abomination. He can join Alan Moore in his loathing of pop culture appropriation.

    Myself, I'll enjoy playing my RK! see ya!

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Radhruin_EU View Post
    It's been discussed before... the RK can be RPed well enough as a more traditional sort of runic magician, rather than with all the comic-book battle-magic stuff. Someone who can make use of runic spells (which were traditionally imagined as having to be painstakingly carved, engraved or incised into an item, like a wand or a staff* for example that the magician carried with him, and pronounced carefully to cast them) for less outrageous purposes such as divination, protection, concealment, misdirection and persuasion, and for making weapons more keen-edged or to be the bane of some foe. Have Elves have a bit more of a knack for it (because they're more 'magical') except where it's something Dwarves might be good at, given how they're generally portrayed.

    So there you go - not quite Tolkien but rather more in the spirit of things.


    *For portability. Stone was more for for permanence, when needed - going with traditional ideas, a Dwarf might carve a rune-spell onto a stone that he then placed with some treasure, so that there was a spell of concealment cast over it.
    Interesting...thanks for the reply.
    Aut inveniam viam aut faciam

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    6,357
    Quote Originally Posted by Aamu View Post
    You know...there's a tremendous amount we *don't* know about Middle Earth. Which makes tendentious debates about whether something fits "lore" an exercise in subjectivity. It's interesting to banter about the RK class and how well it fits but there's no way to know what Tolkien would think about it. His son thinks any spin-off media based on any of the Professor's creations are abomination. He can join Alan Moore in his loathing of pop culture appropriation.

    Myself, I'll enjoy playing my RK! see ya!
    'You know', given that the RK was purely made up for the game by Turbine to give it the crowd-pleasing, lightning-flinging pew-pew-pew it hadn't had before (and hadn't launched with, tellingly) that's an incredibly flimsy excuse. The LM was originally supposed to be all the mage we'd ever get.

  25. #25
    Oh yes, the old 'players trying to RP Tolkien's world in Turbine's LotRO', as opposed to 'players trying to RP within the lore of the game itself.'
    With the former invariably putting the latter down as some sort of inferior life-form.

    As long as the world keeps turning forever will there be confusion, with hardly anyone taking the time to try and understand the other's point of view.
    [center][I]"No, you are right. There is strength in these hobbits yet,
    and if they need to repel dangers from outside, they will do so."[/I]
    -Ranger Halros[/center]

 

 
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

This form's session has expired. You need to reload the page.

Reload