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  1. #1
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    Question Hobbit Movie: Why Was The Book Changed?

    Why do you think they changed the book to make the movie? Use specific examples of when the added or took away parts that were included in the book. For example:

    The Hobbit Movie added the Pale Orc to the storyline. This wasn't in the section of the book that they covered in the movie.
    I believe they did this to add inner conflict and motivation to Thorin to help give him character and a background of why he is more serious and strict than the other dwarves. This also adds a good and interesting subplot to the film and you wonder throughout the movie, what will go down between Thorin and the Pale Orc.

  2. #2
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    Yes, Azog was most likely resurrected and implemented as an antagonist in order to make Thorin a deeper and likable character. In the book, he's mostly after the gold, but in the movie, he wants revenge on Azog for the lives of the dwarves killed at Azanulbizar, including his grandfather.

    I'm currently attempting to accept this change, and I'm actually quite happy they've made something "more" out of Thorin's character as compared to the book. He's definitely more complex and darker in the movie version.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by SilverWolf93 View Post
    Yes, Azog was most likely resurrected and implemented as an antagonist in order to make Thorin a deeper and likable character. In the book, he's mostly after the gold, but in the movie, he wants revenge on Azog for the lives of the dwarves killed at Azanulbizar, including his grandfather.

    I'm currently attempting to accept this change, and I'm actually quite happy they've made something "more" out of Thorin's character as compared to the book. He's definitely more complex and darker in the movie version.
    I agree they are making him more likable. Quite honestly I didn't like Thorin in the book that much. Seemed greedy and a bit of a jerk. Then around the point I start to like him Bilbo "betrays" him and I don't like him again. I never had any pity for the dwarves in the book and it did seem like they were after the gold.

    It seems as if Thorin's roots go much deeper in the movie. I'm not 100% sure but wasn't Thorin just supposed to be a very young dwarf when Smaug attacked them under the mountain? I had thought he was young to the extent he wouldn't be fighting or be a leader like he was in the movie.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slin6 View Post
    I'm not 100% sure but wasn't Thorin just supposed to be a very young dwarf when Smaug attacked them under the mountain? I had thought he was young to the extent he wouldn't be fighting or be a leader like he was in the movie.
    Well I think that the ruler of the lonely mountain was Thrain at the time rather than Thror, because then Thorin would be older. But he may be younger than we think, he is a dwarf and their beards make it hard to tell their age.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slin6 View Post
    I agree they are making him more likable. Quite honestly I didn't like Thorin in the book that much. Seemed greedy and a bit of a jerk. Then around the point I start to like him Bilbo "betrays" him and I don't like him again. I never had any pity for the dwarves in the book and it did seem like they were after the gold.

    It seems as if Thorin's roots go much deeper in the movie. I'm not 100% sure but wasn't Thorin just supposed to be a very young dwarf when Smaug attacked them under the mountain? I had thought he was young to the extent he wouldn't be fighting or be a leader like he was in the movie.
    Yes--if you look at the timeline in the appendices of ROTK, and add it up, you see that Thorin was only 24 when Smaug attacked. That was still a child in the eyes of the dwarves. And the war with the orcs begins some 23 years after the dragon and is begun because Azgog beheaded Thror and desecrated the body. Thorin was still less than 60 years old when the war with the orcs ended in 2799 of the Third Age, which makes him younger than Kili is in the Hobbit movie. However, even being that young doesn't automatically make him unable to be the fighter or the leader he was in the movie. In the book, Dain, Thorin's distant cousin, is the one who actually kills Azgog, and he was younger than Thorin by about 20 years--it says in the appendices that it was an amazing thing that Dain was able to kill the orc as he was a stripling youth to his people. Despite being that young, though, he takes up the lead of his people after his own father Nain is killed, and they willingly follow him despite his youth, and he stands up to his elder Thrain, Thorin's father, quite well in the appendices. However, the movie doesn't really try to give Thorin an age, and even so, it's hard or next to impossible to take an older person and make them appear much younger, so I'll just stretch it a bit and pretend

    *and note: Yes, I'm using the ROTK appendices as my reference; no, I do not have a thorough command of the Histories of Middle Earth 12 volumes as I will admit that I have not read them, only skimmed through them, so if I have something wrong, look at it this way: we're considering the movie, which is based upon the rights given to Tolkien Enterprises, which strictly limits said enterprise to the material found in the Hobbit, the LOTR trilogy, and the appendices found in those works, so technically, Jackson is limited to the appendices and can't incorporate anything from the histories anyway....


    I agree with you whole-heartedly on Thorin--I like what Jackson has done with the character. I like the reasons given to him for his desire to return to Eribor--not because he wanted the gold, like the book character--and I like how Jackson gave him a grudge against the elves, which will of course come into play with Thorin's showdown with Thranduil later. I loved Thorin in the movie--I agree with Balin when he says he saw on the battlefield that day a dwarf he could call king I also agree with you completely with your take on the dwarves in the book. I frankly just didn't like them-and especially Thorin--all that much in the book as they came across to me as foolish and greedy (and though I'm currently re-reading the book, I still haven't changed my mind on that). I think Jackson's take on the dwarves is much richer and interesting. I'm sympathetic to his dwarves and find them quite heroic--Jackson makes me wish I could be right beside them, marching to Eribor! The book doesn't do that for me.

    The book is a child's story, I get that, and I understand Tolkien was writing to entertain young children, and the book does that quite well, but I like that the movie has less of the childish aspects in it and is more in keeping with the trilogy--I am, after all, an adult, not a child. The dwarves in the book don't really capture my interest and they seem rather inept to me in the book, as Gandalf seems to be the one constantly saving them--it's almost like Gandalf is in charge of some kind of dwarvish day care I guess that makes Thorin the little toddler who bullies the other kids and declares that everything in sight is 'his'

    I know there those who agree with me and many more who don't, but I personally greatly enjoyed the movie version of the dwarves, and fell in love with Thorin--I am going to cry when he dies..... But hey, I liked movie Aragorn much better than book Aragorn, too, though I know a lot of people disagree there, too. I enjoy the movies, I enjoy the books, and as far as I'm concerned, they are two different storylines or universes (though I have to admit while I prefer book LOTR trilogy to movie, just using movie Aragorn instead of book Aragorn, I think I'm going to end up prefering the movie Hobbit to the book Hobbit--gasp! Valar forgive me! I've become a heretic! LOL)

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllySanders View Post
    The book is a child's story, I get that, and I understand Tolkien was writing to entertain young children, and the book does that quite well, but I like that the movie has less of the childish aspects in it
    Are you kidding? PJ's even invented some new ones, like Radagast being a loon.

  7. #7
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    My wife and I saw Peter Jackson's The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey at the movie theater yesterday morning. When we returned home in the early afternoon I removed (one copy of) The Hobbit from my bookshelf and found it completely unchanged from when I had bought it some twenty odd years ago. It was a very great relief.
    Faërie is a perilous land, and in it are pitfalls for the unwary and dungeons for the overbold. – J.R.R. Tolkien, ‘On Fairy-Stories’.

  8. #8
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    Dec 2008
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    I think its an exercise in futility to try and compare the Book to the Movie.

    You can talk about the movie for its virtues
    You can talk about the book for its virtues

    But when you try to compare the two its a lost cause.
    They are two very different stories, with only names and places in common.

    The LOTR movies and books are a more productive discussion.

    But I suggest if you want to enjoy either the Hobbit Book or the Hobbit Movie - you better keep them separate.
    Take Care,
    D.
    [URL="http://forums.lotro.com/showthread.php?496094-The-Brief-Mr.-Bako-Bongo-In-Soup-Du-Jour."]My LOTRO Comics and Fan-Fiction[/URL]

 

 

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