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  1. #26
    1. i agree the sleigh was ridiculous, but i didnt think radagast was portrayed unfairly. we know that he has an excessive love of nature, that saruman holds him in contempt and that tolkien deems him a failure in his mission, so i dont think the eccentricity was off base.

    3. im baffled by azog. if they wanted an orc villian, which makes sense, why not bolg? you can incorporate him without needlessly mucking up the dwarvish backstory, like they had to do with azog.

    5. elrond fought sauron at dagorlad, i think he could handle a few orcs. i did think they went a little out of their way to emphasize the animosity between elves and dwarves. i mean, what was the deal with thranduil refusing to help at erebor? that seemed unnecessary.

    6. saruman is the head of the council, and he is more powerful than gandalf. as for galadriel, she dislikes saruman and always wanted gandalf to head the council, but he didnt have that amibition. so it makes sense that she would conspire with gandalf, and that he would be somewhat passive.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by RocketBoy View Post
    So....
    Who can argue with me?
    Movie critics, and anyone else with half an ounce of sense? That movie's a bloated cash-cow that is simply not as good as the LOTR movies. Nothing to rave about unless you're like, twelve years old or something.

  3. #28
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    I enjoyed the movie but is it just me... thinking the fight scenes were way overdone? Aside from all the other things mentioned the luck of the dwarves in the fight scenes was not only unbelieveable but just darn laughable. Why do movies have to one-up each other with more and more scenes of fires and destruction rather than common sense and believable drama? I hate to think we humans have decided we like the short scenes of action with all the sound bites because we truly do have a short attention span.

    Wouldn't Radagast have been crazier if he had resembled a more common wizard while acting crazy? Elrond is a healer not an orc fighter, why was he first presented in the orc fighter role? Also... our new mount after the goat may just be an Elk...

    No matter, I enjoyed the movie for what it is - a look at another person's mental image of The Hobbit. It did not match my own but it was still entertainment.
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  4. #29
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    If you'd seen Jackson's adaptation of Tolkien's other work I think you'd come to the theater expecting some deviations from the original--and be right. If for some reason you had not seen Peter Jackson's version of The Lord of the Rings you had to know that you were in for some changes when he could not even leave Tolkien's famous "In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit..." quote unchanged.

    The events in The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, therefore, were not entirely unexpected. However, they were a bit disorienting. The landscape changed so frequently that it was difficult to know where Thorin and Company was at any given time. Are we in Rohan? This sure looks like it. Wait, I don't recall the dwarves going there. A ruined farmhouse? Oh, for a moment I thought that was going to be the Forsaken Inn. I did recognize The Carrock, however, so I anticipate that we shall be meeting Beorn early in the next film. I hope that scene will not disappoint.

  5. #30
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    #1 Thranduil didn't have enough screen time, that Elk was fabulous!

    seriously though...
    - Kili, Bofur, Fili--somewhat in that order--has the most lines/screen time (among the dwarves except for Thorin) because they have bigger names apparently. I don't think the script followed the book closely on who said this and that
    - the prettier dwarves have less beards and don't look like dwarves at all. they're hot and sexy said fangirls/boys :P
    - I like Radagast's look from the game more. why the need for bird poop on half of his face?
    - that part in...LL? melodramatic much? Thorin on male model stance while Balin tells his sob story
    - the stone giants' thunder battle whatever--waste of time
    - Azog. make it all orcs they're too CG. I like the game's defiler look more. crookedly nasty and not weightlifter on steroids

    I still prefer the LOTR films. The Hobbit has that Hollywood blockbuster formula that I dislike. I can't help but agree with critics who said it was unnecessary to make 3 films out of this one book. but I still have high hopes for the next 2 films, maybe Smaug can bring something new to the table

  6. #31
    The introductory scene changed a key element of the book needlessly: the escape of Thror and family through the secret door.
    The party scene, while not completely true to the book, was very well done.
    Ian McKellan looked and acted like he was entering the end stages of Alzheimer's. It was sad seeing him in this film compared to previous work he'd done, especially LOTR.
    The Troll scene starts out well enough, although again the plot is needlessly changed, but after the first fight with Kili and Fili, it is unwatchable for its stupidity ( give up to save Bilbo?)
    Radagast is NOT portrayed as he was in any writings of Tolkien. The passages he appears in are very light on detail, and everything that Jackson put in the movie was fabricated. I greatly disliked the bird droppings, the persona, and I thought the rabbit sled, while maybe nice in another work of fantasy, was completely out of place for a Tolkien story.
    The Mountain Giants are utterly ridiculous.
    The Great Goblin makes no sense based on what's in the book or what all other orcs in the movies look like.
    Almost all of the changes, additions, and anachronisms are quite obviously the result of trying to stretch what should have been a 90 minute film into a 9 hour slog. I found it horrendously boring with the exception of the unexpected party, gollum, and a few pieces here and there ( although it was out of place, the Radagast scene was entertaining if taken by itself).
    The childish burp humor and "shove it up the Dragon's Jackson" type comments were seriously out of place.

    I have yet to see a Jackson film that I like. The Fellowship was his best, and still was at best, a 7 out of 10. I'd give this a 2. I won't be seeing the next two.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldbadgerbrock View Post
    The events in The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, therefore, were not entirely unexpected.
    Some, not all. I can't help but think of it as The Hobbit: Some Unexpected Bollocks.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Radhruin_EU View Post
    Some, not all. I can't help but think of it as The Hobbit: Some Unexpected Bollocks.
    LOL! A very appropriate title indeed!

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magdon1 View Post
    The introductory scene changed a key element of the book needlessly: the escape of Thror and family through the secret door.
    The party scene, while not completely true to the book, was very well done.
    Ian McKellan looked and acted like he was entering the end stages of Alzheimer's. It was sad seeing him in this film compared to previous work he'd done, especially LOTR.
    The Troll scene starts out well enough, although again the plot is needlessly changed, but after the first fight with Kili and Fili, it is unwatchable for its stupidity ( give up to save Bilbo?)
    Radagast is NOT portrayed as he was in any writings of Tolkien. The passages he appears in are very light on detail, and everything that Jackson put in the movie was fabricated. I greatly disliked the bird droppings, the persona, and I thought the rabbit sled, while maybe nice in another work of fantasy, was completely out of place for a Tolkien story.
    The Mountain Giants are utterly ridiculous.
    The Great Goblin makes no sense based on what's in the book or what all other orcs in the movies look like.
    Almost all of the changes, additions, and anachronisms are quite obviously the result of trying to stretch what should have been a 90 minute film into a 9 hour slog. I found it horrendously boring with the exception of the unexpected party, gollum, and a few pieces here and there ( although it was out of place, the Radagast scene was entertaining if taken by itself).
    The childish burp humor and "shove it up the Dragon's Jackson" type comments were seriously out of place.

    I have yet to see a Jackson film that I like. The Fellowship was his best, and still was at best, a 7 out of 10. I'd give this a 2. I won't be seeing the next two.
    I agree wholeheartedly.

    Though I'll still see the next two movies eventually. I just won't waste money on them by seeing them in the cinemas.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldbadgerbrock View Post
    If you'd seen Jackson's adaptation of Tolkien's other work I think you'd come to the theater expecting some deviations from the original--and be right. If for some reason you had not seen Peter Jackson's version of The Lord of the Rings you had to know that you were in for some changes when he could not even leave Tolkien's famous "In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit..." quote unchanged.

    The events in The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, therefore, were not entirely unexpected. However, they were a bit disorienting. The landscape changed so frequently that it was difficult to know where Thorin and Company was at any given time. Are we in Rohan? This sure looks like it. Wait, I don't recall the dwarves going there. A ruined farmhouse? Oh, for a moment I thought that was going to be the Forsaken Inn. I did recognize The Carrock, however, so I anticipate that we shall be meeting Beorn early in the next film. I hope that scene will not disappoint.
    One of the first things I thought after seeing the trailer...Are they in Rohan?

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by newwwwb View Post
    i did think they went a little out of their way to emphasize the animosity between elves and dwarves. i mean, what was the deal with thranduil refusing to help at erebor? that seemed unnecessary..
    If the dragon wipes out the dwarves and leaves then the elves could go in and clean out the vaults and become filthy rich. Mirkwood elves are kinda jerks.

  12. #37
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    I actually really liked it. I've seen it three times now. That being said, I do manage a movie theater so I haven't paid a single dime to see it. I might go see it again just for that reason.

    The one thing that bothers me the more I think about it, is a scene at the end of the movie. When all of the dwarves are on the tree and everything's looking all hopeless, Thorin decides to try to be a hero. He stands up on the tree, eyes down his opponent. A very epic music starts playing....and BAM one hit and he's down. It's about as anti-climactic as possible. The first time I saw that I found myself thinking, Seriously? Thorin's clearly just not a very good fighter. He might as well have just jumped off the cliff with how well he can hold his own in a fight with Azog.

    I can't wait to see the next film. Now that all of the back story and introductions are done, I have a feeling the next film is going to be much faster paced. (Of course, it will be so only so long as the Kili/Tauriel romance doesn't bog things down too much...Stockholm Syndrome, anyone?)

  13. #38
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    I surprised myself by enjoying the film and after nearly 3 hours in the cinema I was wanting more, maybe because I need a new prescription for my specs some of the actions sequences blurred or maybe I need to see it at a cinema with the high frame rate. (has anyone seen it twice yet in the 2 formats?)

    Some minor points of bother:

    They seem to belabour the antipathy between the elves and dwarves, clearly when Fili and Kili fall in love with an elf maiden in a later film we are supposed to find this unlikely untill we learn the the elf maiden was a dude, but thats OK because generally dwarves have trouble telling the difference between the genders of dwarves, (although I saw some lady dwarves in Dale, but I wont let it upset me).

    Arent Elves fond of diadems!, I shall have to visist my lotro barber to get one.

    Some garbled stuff about the witch king being interred with his Morgul knife in Rhudaur?, (for a time Warner Production surely its not too hard to drop a line to someone with a passing knowlege of the lore at LOTRO to avoid this junk?), do Morgul knives only appear after the fall of Minas Ithil?, or does Morgul knife just mean black sorcery?.

    Orcrist and Glamdring dont seem to glow like Sting, Orcrist seems to look like a Falchion rather than your typical elvish longsword I wish I could have a curved single edged sword in LOTRO but Turbine holds to the lore that two edges "good", single edged "bad" and from the "east, clearly PJ doesnt share those restraints.

    They waver on the pronunciation of Gloin throughout the film.

    Oh but I enjoyed the Great Goblin, although he was not as "Les Paterson" as I was lead to belive he should have been.

    I thought Bilbos fight with the goblin imp which leads to Gollum loosing thr ring was cleverly done, (once one accepts the suspension of disbelief about falling damage that applies throughout this film, (if one carries this forward then surely Denethor will survive his leap in RotK?).

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Procrastinator View Post
    The beginning of the movie makes dwarves look like cowards and elves look like &&&&&&&s. Why were the dwarves backing up when the dragon hadn't even gotten through the door? THey were wearing full face masks, those are supposed to be able to resist dragon fire, it says many times in tolkien lore! Also, dwarves are freaking steadfast and stubborn and defiant, they wouldn't back away even in the face of death.

    The elves just watched it? Why would they add this, it just makes everyone hate the elves without a hope to get revenge. Nothing will happen, there will be this smoldering resentment towards the elves of Mirkwood forever, how will Thorin get revenge? Will he just say "nah it's okay brah for letting us lose Erebor we needed that"?!?
    I guess it could be inferred from the silmarilion that the full faced dwarf helms were only worn by the dwarves of Nogrod and Belgost and that this technological advantage wouldnt have spread to Durins house, but only a very miserable pedant would think this way.

  15. #40
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    Very disappointed, and very frustrated with the movie- especially after reading all the good reviews. This was NOT Tolkien's the Hobbit. This was Peter Jackson's "Unexpected" fantasy movie inspired by the Hobbit.

    Let's just take Rivendell to Goblin Town as an example. Instead of leaving with Elrond's blessings and their ponies laden with supplies, the dwarves have to sneak out of Rivendell and from those evil elves with no ponies and no Gandalf. Their entry into Goblin Town is all wrong. Bilbo doesn't get dropped, he mysteriously escapes. The dwarves escape is all wrong- and utterly unrealistic the way they survive some of those falls. (after the screwed up mountain giants knocking large pieces of themselves off while fighting and the dwarves somehow don't get crushed on their legs getting smashed into cliffs, I wasn't surprised at that point)

    The way Bilbo gets to Gollum is a bit silly. The riddles are alright, but then his escape is wrong again. He goes through the crack at the wrong time (that was supposed to be when he went through the door getting out before it closed), he sees the dwarves leaving and follows them? That didn't happen in the book. Of course neither did Gandalf just showing up in the middle of Goblin Town without starting a war on the way in. And the Great Goblin being so much bigger (and fatter) than any Uruk ever was? I don't think so. Just so much in this whole sequence wrong.

    So then Bilbo finds the dwarves in the woods (without walking past their gaurds since they don't have any. Strangely the goblins don't pursue them. They just let them go. But then here comes Azog and his warg riders (what the **** is Azog doing in the movie??? He's got no part in the book and doesn't belong, let alone as a major story element "hunting" Thorin.) and they pursue the dwarves- who incredibly seem to be able to outrun wargs right on their heels- not to a grove of trees, but to a cliff with a few trees. Trees that can play dominos very well apparently.

    This is just one sequence. There are so many more. Including, and said so well:

    Quote Originally Posted by Magdon1 View Post
    The introductory scene changed a key element of the book needlessly: the escape of Thror and family through the secret door...
    Ian McKellan looked and acted like he was entering the end stages of Alzheimer's. It was sad seeing him in this film compared to previous work he'd done, especially LOTR.
    The Troll scene starts out well enough, although again the plot is needlessly changed, but after the first fight with Kili and Fili, it is unwatchable for its stupidity ( give up to save Bilbo?)
    Radagast is NOT portrayed as he was in any writings of Tolkien. The passages he appears in are very light on detail, and everything that Jackson put in the movie was fabricated. I greatly disliked the bird droppings, the persona, and I thought the rabbit sled, while maybe nice in another work of fantasy, was completely out of place for a Tolkien story.
    The Mountain Giants are utterly ridiculous.
    The Great Goblin makes no sense based on what's in the book or what all other orcs in the movies look like.
    Almost all of the changes, additions, and anachronisms are quite obviously the result of trying to stretch what should have been a 90 minute film into a 9 hour slog. I found it horrendously boring with the exception of the unexpected party, gollum, and a few pieces here and there ( although it was out of place, the Radagast scene was entertaining if taken by itself).
    The childish burp humor and "shove it up the Dragon's Jackson" type comments were seriously out of place.

    I have yet to see a Jackson film that I like. The Fellowship was his best, and still was at best, a 7 out of 10. I'd give this a 2. I won't be seeing the next two.
    We all left thoroughly disappointed and in many ways disgusted. We have no desire to see the next two. What should have been one, maybe two at most, is obviously being stretched through a bunch of junk that PJ is adding in that has no actual basis on Tolkien's writings, but rather PJ's own imagination. I enjoyed the LotR movies, even with the changes, but this has major and minor all through it. To much for us.
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  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by sirwillow View Post
    Very disappointed, and very frustrated with the movie- especially after reading all the good reviews. This was NOT Tolkien's the Hobbit. This was Peter Jackson's "Unexpected" fantasy movie inspired by the Hobbit.

    <...>

    We all left thoroughly disappointed and in many ways disgusted. We have no desire to see the next two. What should have been one, maybe two at most, is obviously being stretched through a bunch of junk that PJ is adding in that has no actual basis on Tolkien's writings, but rather PJ's own imagination. I enjoyed the LotR movies, even with the changes, but this has major and minor all through it. To much for us.
    This.

    There were some few good scenes, but too many were awkward, or unnecessary, or both (the framing-scene with Ian Holm and Elijah Wood, the White Council in Rivendell, Bilbo's near-defection in the goblin cave-- he's going to stroll back through the giants to Rivendell ALONE?!! Seriously??). For me, the most disappointing scene was the (PJ-added) climax of the movie, where Bilbo rescues the fallen Thorin from Azog. Ridiculous, and contrary to Tolkien's whole portrayal of Bilbo's strength lying more in his wits than in his melee skills. I suppose PJ and Co. wanted some kind of "resolution" to close out the first film, but this was just lame.

    I guess the writers want to include more character development than Tolkien did, or something.
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  17. #42
    When Gandalf appears in Goblin Town. He tells the dwarfs to get up and fight! Don't they know "Don't attack the mezzed NPC!"

    It also could have been explained a bit better that Thorin's grandfather was given one of the Dwarven Seven Rings of power. And it was the ring that made him greedy, thus attracting the attention of Smaug.
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  18. #43
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    THe Bloated Kiwi...

    I have a friend that takes great offense when I call Jackson the Bloated Kiwi. He thinks I'm talking about his weight which is admittedly much diminished. Unfortunately for him, the name still applies...TO HIS EGO. This many years later, my opinion of the LOTR movies is still the same...Unmitigated &&&&. Fortunately for me, I set my expectation meter to ZERO when comes to the Hobbit (three movies, REALLY?) Therefore, I'm not disappointed, much.
    Never Again!

  19. #44
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    I didn't like the way the goblins looked...i liked the 2002 versions better

  20. #45
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    -Radagast having bird poop on his face. Also his voice was a bit odd.

    -Saruman's beard was kind of odd looking. It looked too dark and too wide compared to the Lord of the Rings version.

    -After getting quite used to Tolkien's scrawny Orcs (Uruk-Hai aside), it was strange to see huge bulky Orcs all the time.

    -I would have enjoyed more actual fighting in Goblin Town, rather than the videogame-esque methods of rolling boulders and sweeping Goblins away with long piece of wood.

    -Certain battles that didn't canonically take place, such as when Thorin challenged Azog on the cliff when the trees are falling, struck me as irritating. Not that it wasn't cool to see, but the fact that it was clearly just shoehorned into the movie to make it more action-packed. Especially when Bilbo came to the rescue, something that, at least at this point in the story, seems rather out of character from the Bilbo I know from childhood.

    -Elrond, in the book, is said to wear a silver circlet on his head. Now, in the Lord of the Rings movies, he does wear a silver circlet, but for some reason, in The Hobbit, where it clearly says he wears a silver one, he was wearing a gold one. I do not understand why they made this change. It would have made more sense for him to be wearing the gold circlet in LOTRs rather than here.

    -Some of the Dwarves were strange and un-Dwarfy, rather more like gnomes than Dwarves to my mind. Ori and Bofur were particularly odd looking. It wouldn't have mattered, but those two got a lot of screen time, when Dwarves like Oin, Gloin, Dwalin, Bifur, Dori, or even Nori would have been better.

    That being said, there were some things I genuinely loved about this movie.

    Being a Dwarf fan above all other fantasy races, the Dwarves were pretty awesome. Thorin and company had their issues, but I mean the Dwarves in general. The way Erebor was portrayed was awesome. It was equally awesome when Smaug attacked, literally beating down the gates, and the Dwarven infantry defiantly formed ranks and stood fast awaiting an opponent they couldn't possibly hope to match, much less defeat. Another awesome Dwarf scene was the War of the Dwarves and Orcs at the gates of Moria. Seeing thousands of Dwarves battling thousands of Orcs in live action was a sight to behold. It was also epic to see the Oakenshield indecent in live action, I wasn't expecting that to be in the film. Certain of the Dwarves of Thorin's company were pretty awesome as well. My favorite was Dwalin, since he displayed the stoic badassery of the Dwarves and was just brutal and awesome all the way through. Balin's whole characterization was very good, with him being Thorin's adviser and all that. All of the Dwarves had their good points, but my favorites were most definitely Balin, Dwalin, Oin and Gloin.

    So there were things I hated, and things I loved. On the whole, this movie was very enjoyable to me though.
    Last edited by Elricgodslayer; Jan 17 2013 at 04:54 PM.

  21. #46
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    concerning your love of dwarves(I value elves highest aside from the topic) Fili and Kili were the coolest. And then theres good ole Bombur, my favorite part was when he was cleaning the plates with his mouth rather than his hands during the Blunt the Knives song

  22. #47
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    concerning your love of dwarves(I value elves highest aside from the topic) Fili and Kili were the coolest. And then theres good ole Bombur, my favorite part was when he was cleaning the plates with his mouth rather than his hands during the Blunt the Knives song, which btw suprised me alot considering PJ never put any songs into the trilogy

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mozzarellala View Post
    concerning your love of dwarves(I value elves highest aside from the topic) Fili and Kili were the coolest. And then theres good ole Bombur, my favorite part was when he was cleaning the plates with his mouth rather than his hands during the Blunt the Knives song, which btw suprised me alot considering PJ never put any songs into the trilogy
    But he did put songs in the Trilogy (though I must admit, some of them are only in the extended versions)!

    In the Fellowship:
    1. As Bilbo leaves, he is singing to himself "The Road Goes Ever On.
    2. At the Green Dragon, Merry and Pippin sing their little drinking song "Hey Ho To the Bottle I Go"
    3. In the Midgewater Marshes, Aragorn sings a portion of the Lay of Beren and Luthien

    In the Two Towers:
    1. Eowyn sings Bregalad's Song at the funeral of Theodred

    In Return of the King:
    1. Merry and Pippin sing the Green Dragon Song
    2. Pippin sings "Fade Away" to Denethor
    3. Aragorn sings a bit after he is crowned but I don't think it is more than a few lines.

    I think I may have missed a few. These are just the ones that come to mind. I really wish they would have kept Eowyn's song in the non-extended version. It gives me chills.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Procrastinator View Post
    The beginning of the movie makes dwarves look like cowards and elves look like &&&&&&&s. Why were the dwarves backing up when the dragon hadn't even gotten through the door? THey were wearing full face masks, those are supposed to be able to resist dragon fire, it says many times in tolkien lore! Also, dwarves are freaking steadfast and stubborn and defiant, they wouldn't back away even in the face of death.

    The elves just watched it? Why would they add this, it just makes everyone hate the elves without a hope to get revenge. Nothing will happen, there will be this smoldering resentment towards the elves of Mirkwood forever, how will Thorin get revenge? Will he just say "nah it's okay brah for letting us lose Erebor we needed that"?!?
    On the one hand I would have liked all of the dwarves to attack Smaug, but we all know that's impossible, so retreat would indeed be a better option. As for the elves, I hated them already anyway, especially Thranduil, king of the douches. The dwarves may not be immortal, may not be the first people to arrive (because they were ****ed by the gods and laid to rest) and may not be perfect in character, they are much better than the elves. The elves are and have always been, in my humble opinion, too selfish and 'perfect' (yes, those are sarcastic apostrophe's)...
    The Road goes ever on and on, down from the door where it began.
    Now far ahead the Road has gone, and I must follow, if I can.
    ~Bilbo Baggins~

  25. #50
    I actually loved the movie (and yes, I have read the book multiple times, along with LotR and many of Tolkien's other writings). Sure, some things were over the top and not as described in the book, but I went into the theater expecting Peter Jackson's Middle-Earth, not an exact version of the novel. Overall, I felt that it was a fun movie, and there just aren't enough purely fun and entertaining movies being released these days.
    I found the whole Witch-King story to be a pretty odd deviation from the writings, but I guess we'll see where that goes in the sequels. Also, even though Azog was supposed to be dead before the story, I still have a feeling that he won't survive until the end, since Bolg is in the sequels.

 

 
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