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  1. #1
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    Oct 2012
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    What does The Lord of The Rings mean to you?

    I just ordered The Hobbit and The Lord of The Rings box set, I plan on reading all of the books. I don't usually read but The Lord of The Rings saga is something special to me, I have literally grown up with it. My earliest game experience was playing The Lord of The rings, I remember playing The Return of The King and never getting passed killing the witch king even though there was the two of us. So, what does The Lord of The Rings mean to you?.

  2. #2
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    To me, it is the foundation of fantasy writing.

    I have loved fantasy for as long as I can remember and it was these books that got me started in that amazing and exciting world.

    These books show me what a man can create with only his mind. Also time....lots of time.

    So to me it means, the sky is the limit, if you can only use your imagination.

  3. #3
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    Well, to me it was at first a glimpse at how one can transfer one's imagination into words on paper. I've tried to do this, but I'm nowhere close to where Tolkien got with The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings Trilogy. Then, later on, the books opened the desire to play the game.

  4. #4
    It is my inspiration and my favorite of all stories. Tolkien was a true genius. His work taught me that there are SO many different kinds of love. His Silmarillion tells the story of how Sauron came into being, and in that way it told me that all evil comes from good. Tolkien's works are the reason I love to write so much.

  5. #5
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    Lord of the Rings is one of my longest lasting loves.

    Ever since I watched the films when I was very young, I was hooked. I am late in reading the books though because I grew up with the films already out and was watching them before I even knew there were books! I've read the Hobbit twice and I'm reading the first book of LOTR now. I also own 'Tales of a Perilous Realm' (If I remember that right), 'The Silmarillion' and 'Children of Hurin', and Plan to read them after the LOTR.

    Middle Earth takes me away to a better world when I need it. I love the honour and courage of men that doesn't seem to exist in the real world, and the king being the one to rule the country (As it should be, forget the government!) and lead his people. I also love the way people come together in the battles and the way a 'city' can be seen from afar as one building made of many structures. No urban landscape stretching for miles and miles and miles!
    I also love the different races and the fact they all have certain traits that make them the race they are - for example, hobbits love food and comfort and merrymaking, elves are elegant and love nature, dwarves love their mines and are very stubborn etc etc..

    Its so set apart from this world that it is a haven to escape to when the real world gets me down. The game has been my biggest hobby since I was about 15 (Though I had a different account back then hence why my characters now arent at level cap)

    Big inspiration and best escape from life about sums it up.

  6. #6
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    I read the LotR and the Hobbit for the first time in the winter of 2000/2001 when I was a teenager (25 now)... a relatively rough time for me on several levels. And Tolkien really taught me what words can do to you. Therefore alone, it will always be my No 1 book. Gladly, I was able to look at the movies - which had their releases soon after I read through the books for the first time - as what they are, interpretations of the book. So despite the changes, Middle-earth just got wider for me through them and over the years that followed I soaked everything up like a sponge that was connected to Tolkien and his writings.


    Interestingly enough, I did not get into fantasy after that - in fact, I came to dislike low-fantasy and even some high-fantasy books even more because nothing gave me the feeling of Middle-earth. The biggest disapointment in that regard was Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire", which annoyed me after a good start. I rather moved into the classics direction... Shakespeare, a lot of German writers... but I guess, there are similarities to Tolkien as well.

    So Tolkien's writings really opened my eyes on a lot of levels... it motivated my love for both books and movies and it touched me on a deep personal level, as "romantic" as this sounds.

  7. #7
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    Lord of the Rings = Awesomeness

  8. #8
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    I grew up in the UK in the 1980's to a working class family which was 'doing well' in commercial terms. When I was 11 years old I changed school through passing an 11+ to a grammar school, to which I duly attended.

    In this school I encountered a culture which was almost entirely foreign to me and I found myself quite isolated much of the first (and subsequent years, except my (few) close friends).

    In my 2nd year at this school (when I was 12) the tweed jacket wearing, baldy, bearded blatant ex-hippie english teacher brought in 'The Hobbit' for the class to read out in our English Language classes in 5 minute turns, and we began to read it.

    I was absolutely hooked - I read the rest of it at home and pretended I didn't at school (children eh?). Retrospectively I might imagine there was some relation between Bilbo being taken off into this strange land with no control.. but in truth suspect I just loved the adventure, warmth and humour in the whole tone of the book. That set me off into a love of fantasy writing, and when I read Lord of the Rings, the first time, I was equally hooked. (Although I did skip most of the descriptive prose then and jump between the 'action' scenes).

    So LotR, to me, is something that has been a part of my life/me since I was an emergent adult and (I hope) has given me an ability to look outside the mainstream and appreciate the the things that I might not have otherwise done had I not had that what I had at an early age.

    I don't know what LotR and Tolkien means exactly to me, but I do know that i'm glad I experienced it, and that I wouldn't be sure how different I would be had I not.
    Last edited by Dane77; Oct 26 2012 at 06:03 PM.

  9. #9
    I've been A LOTR/Hobbit/Tolkien fan since about 1977 (anybody here remember the Rankin/Bass Hobbit? ). I saw the the Ralph Bakshi LOTR at a Drive in theater when I was 9. I have read all the books, read the Sillmarillion 7 times (once you get through he first 3-4 chapters it's Epic!).
    "Never laugh at live Dragons...."

    ~Bilbo Baggins

  10. #10
    For me, it's the single greatest piece of literature ever written. (Yes, I know that's a hyperbolic title to give, but this genuinely is my opinion)

    I'm not ashamed to say I got into LotR thanks to the films. I was aware of LotR and Tolkien before that point (And I think I had already read The Hobbit, I'm not sure), but the films pushed me to actively take an interest in it. Now that collection has expanded to include The Sil, Unfinished Tales, Children of Hurin, and HoMe, along with two copies each of LotR and The Hobbit. (Small compared to some of your collections, I'm sure, but still)

    On a more personal note, these books allow me to escape the real world and to get away from the depressing reality. Middle-earth to me is much more appealing than the real world most of the time (with the exception of my family, of course).

  11. #11
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    Post LOTR

    I am lucky enough to live in NZ and have travelled to the movie sets and famous locations from the film. Truly an amazing experience for any lotr fan

  12. #12
    It seems almost religious, with the creation of the universe, that one guy's (I haven't read the silmarillian aside from the first chapter, man it read like molasses, but I've heard about most of it from other people, what's that guys name?) rebellion, the big war between him and the elves, elves even being twisted into goblins (fallen angels?), and other things like that. Bearing in mind that Tolkien was a devout catholic.
    Last edited by wannabe_falconer; Nov 11 2012 at 11:50 PM.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by wannabe_falconer View Post
    It seems almost religious, with the creation of the universe, that one guy's (I haven't read the silmarillian aside from the first chapter, man it read like molasses, but I've heard about most of it from other people, what's that guys name?) rebellion, the big war between him and the elves, elves even being twisted into goblins (fallen angels?), and other things like that. Bearing in mind that Tolkien was a devout catholic.
    Who Melkor? He made Sauron his servant and taken the Silmaril's to rule Middle Earth with them. Yea and i think he twisted them into Orcs too.

  14. #14
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    It is my eternal, immortal beloved and my inspiration for all that is fair and just. I saw the films when I was around 9 (which is 7-8 years ago) and after that, I read The Hobbit in Dutch (I am Dutch). In the last two years, I have read The Hobbit twice, The Fellowship of the Rings once and I am currently reading The Two Towers and I'll read The Return of the King after that.

    I have been bulking up on Tolkien books already, though, and I currently own the LotR-trilogy, The Hobbit, The Silmarillion, The Children of Hurin, Tales from the Perilous Realm, Roverandom and Unfinished Tales. Besides those, I own David Day's "A Guide to Tolkien" and the 'visual companion' books to the films Fellowship of the Rings, Two Towers, Return of the King(I have this one in English and Dutch) and The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (all by Jude Fisher). I also own the "Official Movie Guide" to the The Hobbit film (a book by Brian Sibley) and I have just ordered a book about Tolkien, the man and his works (in Dutch) by a Dutch-Belgian writer who is a professor in English and a Tolkien expert. I hope I'll have finished reading all of those by summer 2014... Oh, and I plan on reading the LotR trilogy every year from now on :P
    The Road goes ever on and on, down from the door where it began.
    Now far ahead the Road has gone, and I must follow, if I can.
    ~Bilbo Baggins~

  15. #15
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    For me, it is many things.

    1) The foundation of modern fantasy as it is known (even many authors who swear they hate Tolkien's works have drawn their inspiration to a view of creatures such as Elves and dwarves from a view that he essentially created -- no, he did not create Elves and dwarves and was inspired by Norse myth, but his presentation was unique and radically different from the Norse presentation.)
    2) Simply the greatest work of fiction of any genre of all time.
    3) The clear inspiration for my own endeavors as an author. I had determined at the age of 8, after reading LotR, that I would become an author myself one day...it took over 20 years, but I made it.

  16. #16
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    Smile


    At the least, and I mean the least, it (along with The Hobbit, The Silmarillion et al) has been something I could keep reading during a period while -for some reason- I couldn't read anything at all. Then, it (the whole legendarium) became something I would re-read almost ritually at least once a year, in parts or as a whole.

    Overall, it's much more than mere fantasy for me. (Admittedly I refuse to define it as fantasy at all, maybe even in spite of its author, but prefer mythology). It's been a window opening into a common human consciousness with very ancient and widespread roots in many dimensions (cross-cultural, cross-religious, diachronic...) leading to gain a better or deeper understanding of seemingly distinct or unrelated texts, textual/oral traditions, literatures, institutions; from religious canons to folk lore to cinema and music.

    Both aside from and interrelated with the above, it's been a major source of fuel feeding the steam of my love of and interest in languages...

    And finally, on a very personal and discreet note... as fate likes playing the prank at times... it happened to be a bitter present (given not received by me) :-\
    Last edited by Urwendil; Feb 01 2013 at 08:10 PM. Reason: typo

  17. #17
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    Everything the previous posters have stated and more.
    I first read the Hobbit 36yrs ago and the LOTR Trilogy shortly after (only managed to get through Sil about 4 times cover to cover though; it's a bit heavy going in paces). I don't read them so often now, but still listen to them on audio book a couple of times a year, along with the various BBC audio plays of both.
    I was so impressed that I made a point of reading them once a year, every year until i was well into my 20's. As a teenager I used to collect as much memorabilia as possible, my bedroom was plastered with Alan Lee posters and artwork, and I got the official calendar every year for many years.
    I seem to remember going through at least 2 copies of the Rankin/Bass movies on VHS as they slowly degraded through continual playing.
    I've spent a small fortune on the movies going through the various Theatrical/Extended/BluRay/Box-Sets, and seen the Hobbit at the cinema 3 times (IMAX, HFR, and 2D - HFR was the best).
    Since discovering this game last year it's also become a big part of my life, and seeing as I'm semi-retired (I gave up work a couple of years ago to care for my disabled missus), I probably spend about 60hrs a week in game.

    So yes, Middle Earth has been for a long time, and will continue to be a huge part of my life.
    You could say that I'm obsessed!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by K0H-SpYrO View Post
    I just ordered The Hobbit and The Lord of The Rings box set, I plan on reading all of the books. I don't usually read but The Lord of The Rings saga is something special to me, I have literally grown up with it. My earliest game experience was playing The Lord of The rings, I remember playing The Return of The King and never getting passed killing the witch king even though there was the two of us. So, what does The Lord of The Rings mean to you?.
    Yeah, I hated Witch King too. I took me like a month to find the trick to killing him . Back to main idea now, Tolkien 'saved me' I think thats the best description I can come up with.

  19. #19
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    In my humble opinion, and it's just that, The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings are the greatest pieces of literature that anyone has ever written. The way he writes is just ingenious.

    I mean, he has Galadrial and Celeborn talking in very correct English and on the other hand you have Sam muttering about being hung on the end of a rope as a warning to numbskulls.

    I am going from memory as I write this because I am at work, but one phrase I loved from Tolkien's writings was how he described how angry Smaug was when he discovered(What the Hell did Bilbo take, I'm drawing a blank) something was missing from his horde. Tolkien described it as “His rage passes description - the sort of rage that is only seen when rich folk that have more than they can enjoy suddenly lose something that they have long had but have never before used or wanted.”

    I love that phrase.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, totally worn out & proclaiming "WOW, what a ride!"
    [I][FONT=comic sans ms][COLOR=#ffff00]Continuing the never ending battle to keep Lobelia Sackville-Baggins in check[/COLOR][/FONT][/I]

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by EGONIL View Post
    I've been A LOTR/Hobbit/Tolkien fan since about 1977 (anybody here remember the Rankin/Bass Hobbit? ). I saw the the Ralph Bakshi LOTR at a Drive in theater when I was 9. I have read all the books, read the Sillmarillion 7 times (once you get through he first 3-4 chapters it's Epic!).
    Batter, jabber, whip and hammer, hoooo! You go, my lad!! (Ho ho, my lad! )

    Almost forty years later and I can still hear those songs in my head. I still love Glenn Yarbrough, and I'm really upset with Peter Jackson for cutting the dwarves' song (which was really quite good) so short in a three-film adaptation... BOOO!!

    ((Oh wow, and I just found that old soundtrack on YT here... man, I love this newfangled internet thing!))

    "Less can be more and small can be beautiful;
    For life isn't all just big and wonderful.
    What do I need when you get right down to it?
    All my cares come from greed, and it's time that I knew it.
    Things I can't do without are the small things that life is all about.

    Less can be more and small can be beautiful;
    I don't want it all, just part of wonderful.
    For what do I need when you get right down to it?
    Just a garden and seed, and the love to pursue it.
    Things I can't do without are the small things that life is all about."


    This song (Less Can Be More, from the 1980 Rankin/Bass Return of the King) pretty much sums up what LOTR means to me. A message that also, in my opinion, flew completely over Jackson's head... watching the new Hobbit it was as if every single scene had to be the most absurdly dramatic (and expensive production) moment in Middle-Earth history. Instead of enhancing the atmosphere it completely drowned out the simple themes of humble folk that Tolkien used so well as a foil for the great saga. It was an impressive display of eye candy, but there's still nothing like curling up by a nice fire and reading the work of a true master storyteller. For the hundredth time. Although I suppose if you don't have the patience to sit through more than a minute of dwarf song you might disagree.
    Last edited by Oraekja; Feb 02 2013 at 03:22 AM.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oraekja View Post
    Batter, jabber, whip and hammer, hoooo! You go, my lad!! (Ho ho, my lad! )

    Almost forty years later and I can still hear those songs in my head. I still love Glenn Yarbrough, and I'm really upset with Peter Jackson for cutting the dwarves' song (which was really quite good) so short in a three-film adaptation... BOOO!!

    ((Oh wow, and I just found that old soundtrack on YT here... man, I love this newfangled internet thing!))
    By all that is divine, fair and just... Thank you SO very much for this link. This music kindles a hearth in my heart that will never entirely stop burning. I am trying to learn some of these songs on guitar, but I could never find a good playlist with all of the songs. Thank you, thank you, thank you!
    The Road goes ever on and on, down from the door where it began.
    Now far ahead the Road has gone, and I must follow, if I can.
    ~Bilbo Baggins~

  22. #22
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    Ah, I do adore this question but as a person who often needs time to think before they say something it's hard for me to answer it verbally. But what does LOTR mean to me..? It means.... home.

    I remember once being asked on tumblr who I related to most and why and I honestly drew conclusions of equal intensity from more than one character and that just makes me feel like I've found home because I'm not the only one who felt or is feeling a certain way or going through a certain thing (even if we're going through it for different reasons and in different ways). It gives me someone to vent to, in a way, or someone to pretend I am when I read and when their problems are resolved, I feel a little better as well.

    LOTR offers role models and lessons for me. For example, and I blush to admit I try my best every day to be as loyal as Sam. I remember doubting myself and my position in life and I could honestly never thank Tolkien (or Peter Jackson as I haven't read this far into the books yet) enough for that speech he gave at the end of The Two Towers. It really made me try hard to look for that good and when I can't find it, to make it myself so that others may find it.

    Not to mention it's just a great escape from reality when I need it. And when I turn off the TV or put down my book, I don't actually leave Middle Earth. Not because I can log onto LOTRO but because those lessons and characters stick with me and even if I'm not consciously thinking about them, there's that part inside of me where my knowledge of the great deeds and victories of Middle Earth reside, ready to push it's way to the front of my mind and cheer me up when needed. So LOTR really is a home for me. A home, a form of self-therapy, and an inspiration.

  23. #23
    A game i log into from time to time untill its shuts down, when i wanna be alone,dark and cold and craft.I find peace in the landscape and not a soul in sight.And the chat from npc's is just a wonderful sight.

    It gives me that alone time i crave when am on the internet playing mmos and don't wanna be around other players or people.

    It means i can enjoy my need to chain kill 300 mobs sometimes more for some what better and non useful skills alike,then 300 more for a few hides, and TP.

    It means a empty house somewhere near bree with stuff in it i only seen once.

    It means i will be sad when it shuts down,and money i wasted while playing.

    It means i hope when i go into bree their is rain,and more rain for an hour or two...

    It means i really know what it is too grind.

    It means,i can't understand why i waste so much time.

    It means a vendor to sell all my crafts too as no one will ever buy.

    It means to always try games that went free to play,or free 2 try..to see if they are as boring as this or are better then this.

    It means to keep tabs on game reviews and release dates of other online mmo's.and be in a wreck that this one may close.

    It means alts i'll never play,or even try or get to lv cap,or ever do deeds for their skills or buy.

    It means to never wanna play another class.

    It means to have gagged/yelled at my PC NO!!!!!!i cant ,i cant go on anymore.....But pulled threw to make it a bit past lv 40

    It means when i want to pvp i have to go play another game.

    It means when i want to lv a "bad guy" i have to go play another game.

    It means i can't wait to see whats on sale in the shop,and hope i can use it,or need it.

    It means to play a lute.

    It means,i can't wait to get home and call around to beg RL peeps to play LOTRO with me.

    It means i cant wait to log in and get my craft/chain killing on for the weekend and ignore anything in RL.

    It means to talk to the kin i am in, and to the 5 members that have not quit to go play other online games.
    Makes me happy we have only lost 98%of are server pop some say and not all,and all of the pages after the 1st in the kin are 200+ to 555 days inactive.

    It means books i hear of but never will read

    It means 4 movies and one cartoon i once had seen.

    It means alot to tell you what LOTR's means to me.

    It means alot to me and so much more... i love this game so its hard to say.

    It means am addicted somewhat to empty online games with never updated tech.

    And it means am going to become a VIP.
    Last edited by Capocurtis; Mar 29 2013 at 04:59 PM.

  24. #24
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    Alongside with The Chronicles of Narnia, Tolkien's works helped my happyness in my teenage years as the two favourite fantasy works.

  25. #25
    For me, Tolkien's legendarium is one of the many great works of literature. It's a supremely well written mythological story, but it also feels like real ancient history in my hands. It's a reflection of his Catholic faith, which I love. Middle-earth laid the foundation for my love of fantasy, and frankly nothing quite matches Tolkien's work. A poster above wrote about being disappointed with the Game of Thrones series, and I feel the same way.

    The characters and the themes of the story are inspiring beyond a doubt. How Sam perseveres with his friend Frodo on a practical suicide mission and sticks with him through thick and thin. How Aragorn rises from obscurity to become the great king of the men of Middle-earth and rule them with justice. Gandalf does not overthrow Sauron with hatred and power but guides the free people of Middle-earth with love to victory. The valor in the face of overwhelming odds and hopelessness, honor despite cruelty, friendship despite racial estrangement. I could go on and on about the insightful themes, symbols, motifs, and memorable characters that populate his work. I'll continue to enjoy the Lord of the Rings for a very long time.

 

 
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