We have detected that cookies are not enabled on your browser. Please enable cookies to ensure the proper experience.
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 30 of 30
  1. #26

    Re: Role Playing an Elf

    Lots of great advice posted here! For my part, I do think elves are the hardest of our races to RP really well, but also some of the most rewarding. There's something about their nobility, their near-eternality, and their undercurrent of tragedy that attracts many of us on a deep level. When done sloppily, elves are the most likely to be boring, silly, or flat-out ridiculous. When written with love and care, they can be fantastic. You get what you give to them.

    For a first elf, I would very much advise picking a youngster, one who hasn't seen everything and been everywhere already. There are two reasons for this - the first is strictly practical. As an older elf, your character will be expected to KNOW all the history and the battles and the names of all those pesky kings and queens and their nephews and their second cousins. If your character knows a lot more than you, you may run into trouble pretty quick if the conversation turns historical!

    The second reason is a bit more artsy-fartsy character-oriented. Realistic flaws must be a part of every 3D character and it's hard to develop a realistically flawed elf. So to summarize what I just posted in another topic, by playing an elf, you are already eliminating all of the obvious possibilities for weaknesses that you might have as a mortal. That'll force you to go deeper into mental or spiritual weaknesses. But the older the elf, the more time they have had to 'figure out' the world and their place in it, so many many more possible flaws go out the window. For that reason alone, young elves are far less susceptible to Perfect Character Syndrome. Perfect characters are never good ones.

    As others have pointed out, the road to originality lies in the mundane! We've seen way too many half-elves, elves in love with men, elves related to famous elves, and elves whose father was Elrond's long-lost third twin. That kind of stuff seems at first the most obvious way to spice up an uninteresting character, but don't be tempted! Besides the lore issues, off-the-wall backgrounds are often newer writers' ways to attempt to make their character more interesting. I know from experience that you are much better off starting with a very ordinary background and building a really three-dimensional character to live in it.

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    154

    Re: Role Playing an Elf

    I posted this on Tolkien forum originally, but I'll post it here as well.

    - Growth: In about 1 year they learn to walk, talk and dance, because their wills come soon to the mastery of their bodies. They reach full adult stature in 50 years, which means that they stay as children for much longer time than Men.

    - Pregnancy: About 1 year long.

    - Marriage: Elves have one spouse and their bond is for life. Marriage is not only an union of the two spouses only, it's an union of their houses as well, and the betrothal or wedding ceremony reflects it. The spouses may not live together at all times, but it doesn't mean that they still don't feel a lot of affection towards each other.

    - Betrothal: Elves choose their spouses quite early in their life, especially in the time of peace. Their parents would have to approve the marriage. The wedding can be called off, but it's quite rare, because they seldom mistake of their choice of spouses (though under Shadow this can change). Houses are being invited together, and the future spouses would give each other silver rings.

    - Wedding: Happens at least one year later. The houses are called together once again, and the Elves would then have a great feast. After the feast the bride and groom stand up, and mother of the bride and father of the groom join the hands of the pair, and bless them. Varda is named as the witness by the mother and Manwë by the father. The name of Eru is also spoken, though it's seldom done in another time.

    The couple then receives back the silver rings from each other and treasure them, and they're being replaced by slender golden rings, worn on right index finger. In troubled times, they can also marry each other without ceremony or witness.

    - Divorce (better known as "disunion"): Only possible if the other Elf spouse dies. The spouse that lives can take a new husband or wife, but only in the condition that the spouse in the Halls of Mandos agrees to it, and the fact that he or she can never leave the Halls and have a new body.

    - Male roles are usually: Warrior, smith, woodworker, tinker

    - Female roles are usually: Healer, musician, tailor, gardener

    - Both genders are equal, and they can turn tables if needed: For example, females can make valiant warriors, and males can make effective healers. Though dealings with death can weaken their ability to heal (which makes the minstrel class actually quite accurate with the War Speech, and also the rune-keeper).

    I hope this helps.
    'There now the numbers of Eldar increase,' Voronwë said, 'for ever more flee thither of either kin from the fear of Morgoth, weary of war.'

    In Laurelin - Lover of Tolkien's lore

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    6,188

    Re: Role Playing an Elf

    Quote Originally Posted by Lindaelle
    - Divorce (better known as "disunion"): Only possible if the other Elf spouse dies. The spouse that lives can take a new husband or wife, but only in the condition that the spouse in the Halls of Mandos agrees to it, and the fact that he or she can never leave the Halls and have a new body.
    You might want to add that in practice that was almost unheard of.

    - Both genders are equal, and they can turn tables if needed: For example, females can make valiant warriors, and males can make effective healers. Though dealings with death can weaken their ability to heal (which makes the minstrel class actually quite accurate with the War Speech, and also the rune-keeper).
    Not quite: Elf-women weren't quite as strong, but the difference between male and female there was said to be smaller than among Men. It also only applied to Elf-women who'd not borne a child.

    I don't think you can say 'accurate' there, either. It's implied that Elvish healers had to refrain from dealing death if they were not to weaken their abilities, meaning that they couldn't even go hunting. RK-style swapping between healing and harming is not the same thing at all.

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    The Perilous Realm
    Posts
    2,488

    Re: Role Playing an Elf

    Quote Originally Posted by Lindaelle View Post

    - Divorce (better known as "disunion"): Only possible if the other Elf spouse dies. The spouse that lives can take a new husband or wife, but only in the condition that the spouse in the Halls of Mandos agrees to it, and the fact that he or she can never leave the Halls and have a new body.
    This is not really correct. It happened as you describe it ONCE. But in that case first the husband appealed to the Valar for permission and Manwe in turn appealed to Eru for permission. The Valar decided to allow it in that case because the wife agreed to never return to a corporeal state. But considering all the horrible things that demonstrably stemmed from that remarriage (the entire history of the Noldor in Middle-earth) I highly doubt that the Valar would ever give such permission again.

    This was a VERY special circumstance unlikely to ever happen again. Miriel's desire to never return to corporeal life again was unnatural and Tolkien hints that there may have been some kind of taint in her soul. Furthermore, even she ended up going back on that promise to remain in the Halls of Mandos. For every other Elf, "death" is only temporary since after a time in the Halls of Mandos Elves are able to reincarnate. It is highly unnatural for any Elf to not desire to return to life. And for any Elf in Middle-earth whose spouse dies, remarriage really isn't an option as in time their spouse will return to life in Aman and will be waiting for them there.

    Thus, while it did happen once under extremely rare circumstance and only with the permission of Eru and the Valar, divorce and remarriage isn't really a thing among Elves.
    Last edited by Fionnuala; Jun 07 2012 at 10:10 AM.
    [URL="https://sarahmccabemythopoet.wordpress.com/"][COLOR=#b22222]Falling Toward Mythopoesis[/COLOR][/URL][COLOR=#ffd700]~[/COLOR] My personal blog.

    [URL="https://lotromusic.wordpress.com/"][COLOR=#008080]LOTRO Music[/COLOR][/URL][COLOR=#ffd700]~[/COLOR] ABCs, guides and resources for the compleat LOTRO musician.

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    154

    Re: Role Playing an Elf

    Yeah, those are exceptions, really, and I haven't finished reading Morgoth's Ring yet. But I just decided to write those up as I just passed the chapter by.

    Oh, and one more thing. Elves don't really get drunk from common drinks. They have high alcohol tolerance, so it has to be Dorwinion.
    'There now the numbers of Eldar increase,' Voronwë said, 'for ever more flee thither of either kin from the fear of Morgoth, weary of war.'

    In Laurelin - Lover of Tolkien's lore

 

 
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

This form's session has expired. You need to reload the page.

Reload