We have detected that cookies are not enabled on your browser. Please enable cookies to ensure the proper experience.
Results 1 to 25 of 53

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,174

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,174

    Before you begin

    The tools you will need are fairly simple. First, you will need a language reference. I personally use http://www.lua.org/manual/5.1/ which is fairly easy to understand and navigate.

    Second, you will want the Turbine API documentation. As of the time this guide was written, the lastest API docs were published on the LoTROInterface.com website at http://www.lotrointerface.com/downlo...mentation.html

    You will need an editor, a simple text editor like Notepad will suffice but some users prefer syntax highlighting editors or project managers to organize their files (I generally just use Notepad).

    If you plan on using any custom graphics, you will want an image editor that can generate .jpg and/or .tga files as these are the only file formats that LoTRO Lua will display.

    The last thing you might want are some sample plugins to dissect and play around with. Turbine published a package of sample files which can be downloaded in a 7zip archive from http://content.turbine.com/sites/lot..._LuaPlugins.7z You may also want to check out LoTROInterface.com or other plugin sources. One of the best ways to learn is to dig in, twist, pull, yank and turn and see what happens

    One rule to bear in mind, most things dealing with Lua are case sensitive so if you keep getting a nil value or an error that a function doesn't exist or any other mysterious error, always double check that you have the correct case.
    Last edited by Garan; Oct 29 2011 at 09:55 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,174

    Getting Started

    Every plugin has at least two elements, a .plugin definition file and one or more .lua code files. The .plugin file must be in a subfolder of the "My Documents\The Lord of the Rings\Plugins" folder (there are slight variations on the path to My Documents based on operating system versions). The most common accepted standard for folder structure is:
    Plugins\
    AuthorName\
    PluginName\
    Resources

    "AuthorName" is a distinct folder used to group all plugins written by an author. The "AuthorName" folder usually contains only .plugin definition files. Each plugin then generally has a subfolder with a name based on the plugin. The "PluginName" folder generally contains all of the .lua code files for a plugin unless the plugin uses files from a shared library. The major benefit of using a shared library for common classes is that code can be maintained in one location. The major drawback of using a shared library is that any changes to the shared code can potentially cause undesirable effects in plugins. I generally prefer to keep a separate copy of all .lua files in each plugin folder so that I will not run into compatability issues (a distant cousin of that old plague called "DLL Hell") if someone wants to only update one of several plugins that might use a common class file.

    The .plugin file is an xml file with the structure:
    Code:
    <?xml version="1.0"?>
    <Plugin>
        <Information>
            <Name>PluginName</Name>
            <Author>AuthorName</Author>
            <Version>VersionNumber</Version>
            <Description>YourPluginDescription</Description>
            <Image>ImagePath</Image>
        </Information>
        <Package>pathToMainLuaFile</Package>
        <Configuration Apartment="ApartmentName" />
    </Plugin>
    "PluginName" is the name used to load the plugin with the "/plugins load PluginName" as well as how it will appear in game in the "/plugins list" and "/plugins refresh" commands. If you use a plugin manager (a plugin that controls loading other plugins) this is also the name that will be listed in the manager.

    "AuthorName" is the name of the plugin author and is only included for documentary/organizational purposes. This has no actual impact on the functioning of the plugin but can be accessed programatially using the Plugins table.

    "VersionNumber" is the version that will be displayed in the "/plugins list", "/plugins refresh" and plugin manager lists. This value can also be used programatically for tagging saved data and automatically processing data updates.

    "YourPluginDescription" is the text that will display in the Turbine Plugin Manager

    "ImagePath" is the path to a .JPG or .TGA file. Note, if the file is greater than 32x32 it will be cropped to 32x32. If the image is less than 32x32 it will be tiled. This image will be displayed in the Turbine Plugin Manager

    The "pathToMainLuaFile" value is the path relative to the Plugins folder to the main Lua code file. Note that the path uses "." as a folder separator instead of "\" or "/". This is the first file that will be loaded, parsed and processed.

    The Configuration setting is optional and will allow a plugin to run in its own Apartment or address space, meaning that it will get its own copy of all Turbine objects and global environment. The most common reasons for including a Configuration setting are to allow a plugin to be unloaded without affecting other plugins or to prevent other plugins from interfering with global values and event handlers. If your plugin does not need to be unloaded and if it uses safe event handlers (discussed later) then you probably do not need a separate apartment. Note that using a separate apartment will significantly increase the amount of memory used by the Lua system since multiple copies of the environment and global object must be created for each apartment.

    One important thing to remember, Plugins are not unloaded, Apartments are unloaded. That is, when you use the "/plugins unload ApartmentName" command you are unloading all of the plugins that share that apartment.
    Last edited by Garan; Jan 18 2015 at 12:46 PM. Reason: typo

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,174

    __init__.lua FILES

    Users can process a special file, __init__.lua by providing just the folder path in an import statement. That is, if there is a lua file with the path "\AuthorName\PluginName\__init __.lua", the file can be processed by using the import command, import "AuthorName.PluginName". Basically, if the parameter passed to the import command is a folder rather than a file, the client will try to load the file "__init__.lua" in the specified folder. Of course, the commands in the __init__.lua file could simply be included in the .lua file that has the import command and the __init__.lua file would no longer serve a purpose.
    Last edited by Garan; Jan 18 2015 at 12:51 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,174

    Loading a plugin

    When a user executes the "/plugins load PluginName" command, the .plugin file with a Name setting matching PluginName will be processed. If the .plugin file contains a Configuration setting with a distinct Apartment name a new global environment is created, otherwise the default global environment is used. The file in the Package setting is loaded, parsed and executed. Since Lua is a scripting language, each statement (which may span multiple lines) is processed in sequence. The parser will continue reading the file until it reaches the end of an executable statement at which point that statement is executed. A semi-colon can be used to terminate a statement but is not required. If the parser detects an error prior to completing processing the main file an error message will be generated and the plugin will not complete loading. Code within functions is compiled but variables and external references are not evaluated until the function is called so it is possible for an error to manifest well after the plugin is loaded and running.
    Last edited by Garan; Jan 18 2015 at 12:55 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,174

    Hello World

    At this point, you are probably ready for your first plugin. Tradition demands that we start with a simple Hello World plugin. The first thing to do is create a .plugin file. We shall call this one, HelloWorld.plugin and it should be saved in the MyDocuments\The Lord of the Rings\Plugins\YourName folder:
    Code:
    <?xml version="1.0"?>
    <Plugin>
     <Information>
      <Name>HelloWorld</Name>
      <Author>YourName</Author>
      <Version>1.00</Version>
     </Information>
     <Package>YourName.HelloWorld.Main</Package>
    </Plugin>
    Note that there is no Configuration tags as this example hardly requires the need to be unloaded separately nor does it need to load or save data in real time and has no event handlers for shared objects.

    The next step is to create the Main.lua file which should be saved in the MyDocuments\The Lord of the Rings\Plugins\YourName\HelloWo rld folder.
    Code:
    import "Turbine.UI"; -- this will expose the label control that we will implement
    import "Turbine.UI.Lotro"; -- this will expose the standard window that we will implement
    HelloWindow=Turbine.UI.Lotro.Window(); -- we call the constructor of the standard window object to create an instance
    HelloWindow:SetSize(200,200); -- sets the window size to 200 by 200 pixels
    HelloWindow:SetPosition(Turbine.UI.Display:GetWidth()/2-100,Turbine.UI.Display:GetHeight()/2-100); -- centers the window in the display
    HelloWindow:SetText("Hello World Window"); -- assigns the title bar text
    HelloWindow.Message=Turbine.UI.Label(); -- create a label control to display our message
    HelloWindow.Message:SetParent(HelloWindow); -- sets the label as a child of the main window
    HelloWindow.Message:SetSize(180,20); -- sets the message size
    HelloWindow.Message:SetPosition(10,90); -- places the message control in the vertical middle of the window with a 10 pixel left and right border
    HelloWindow.Message:SetTextAlignment(Turbine.UI.ContentAlignment.MiddleCenter); -- centers the text in the message control both horizontally and vertically
    HelloWindow.Message:SetText("Hello World"); -- sets the actual message text
    HelloWindow:SetVisible(true); -- display the window (windows are not visible by default)
    After creating the files, load the game and type "/plugins list". If you created the files in the correct location, you will see an entry for HelloWorld (1.00) in the list. This is a good first check to be sure that the files are in the correct location. If they are not, be sure to double check the path you are using is your documents folder, NOT the Program Files folder where the LoTRO programs are installed.

    Once you have verified that the plugin is in the list, enter "/plugins load HelloWorld". Note that while most things in Lua are case sensitive, the name of the plugin in the command is not. If you created the files correctly, you will be rewarded with a simple window displayed in the center of your display with the title, "Hello World", a border, a close button and most importantly the message "Hello World" in the middle of the window.
    Last edited by Garan; Nov 05 2011 at 05:34 PM.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

This form's session has expired. You need to reload the page.

Reload