We have detected that cookies are not enabled on your browser. Please enable cookies to ensure the proper experience.
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 32
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Florida, United States
    Posts
    170

    Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Does anyone know why you are invisible when you put on the One Ring?

    .

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    21

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Wraiths are invisible to the living, the living are invisible to wraiths. When you put on the one ring you step into the world of the wraiths. Wraiths become visible in their true form and continued wearing of the ring will eventually turn you into a wraith and unable to return to the world of the living. How long it takes to become a wraith depends on how resistant you are to magic. Hobbits being down to earth people of the soil with an inherent disbelief in anything magical are the most resistant to the effects of the ring which is why Gollum/Smeagol was able to possess the ring for 500 years and still walk among the living and why hobbits in general were the best keepers of the ring and uniquely qualified to be sent to destroy it. Any other race would have succumbed to the draw of the ring and would have been unable to destroy it. In the end even Frodo couldn't destroy it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Hello,

    the one ring let you change your body in the shadow dimenson from dark lord. This is
    the reason, why it makes you invisible in the real world and makes you visible in the
    shadow dimenson.

    Greetings

  4. #4

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Quote Originally Posted by Al-Kamen View Post
    Wraiths are invisible to the living, the living are invisible to wraiths. When you put on the one ring you step into the world of the wraiths. Wraiths become visible in their true form and continued wearing of the ring will eventually turn you into a wraith and unable to return to the world of the living. How long it takes to become a wraith depends on how resistant you are to magic. Hobbits being down to earth people of the soil with an inherent disbelief in anything magical are the most resistant to the effects of the ring which is why Gollum/Smeagol was able to possess the ring for 500 years and still walk among the living and why hobbits in general were the best keepers of the ring and uniquely qualified to be sent to destroy it. Any other race would have succumbed to the draw of the ring and would have been unable to destroy it. In the end even Frodo couldn't destroy it.
    Well I know now that someone has been paying attention to what all this means, and how it came about

  5. #5

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Quote Originally Posted by Luthbalan View Post
    Hello,

    the one ring let you change your body in the shadow dimenson from dark lord. This is
    the reason, why it makes you invisible in the real world and makes you visible in the
    shadow dimenson.

    Greetings
    Then how is it that the shadow kings are visible, or Ring Wraiths are visable in this world.

  6. #6

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Well without wearing the ring, the Ring Wraiths were already a terrible presence, but due to their cloaks they appear to be human. With the ring on, you would see them fully and it was not a pretty sight

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    1,269

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Another interesting question is what exactly is this "shadow realm"? This other dimension so to speak. how does it fit into the Tolkien cosmology?
    Tin foil hats will be big this season - Coco Chanel

  8. #8

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    I think the first answer to this post is a little misleading--it's not that hobbits disbelieve in magic, it's more that they have little use for it, other than as an entertainment at a party (cf. Gandalf.)

    The chief corrupting influence of the ring is POWER. The ability to remake the world in your image--the idea that if something strikes you as wrong, or unjust, or simply just not preferable, you could change it. It represents blasphemy, since God (Eru Iluvatar) created the world and everything within it, and to change it is the height of presumption and arrogance.

    The hobbits have no real lust for power, nor any real capacity to exercise power--even more so when the hobbit is Frodo, who is essentially one of the most virtuous hobbits out there. Hobbits really only care about eating, gardening, singing, smoking, drinking, and having wholesome, innocent parties. They are Elven in a very real sense; but they lack the majesty of the Elves, which would be the Elf's downfall if an Elf got hold of the Ring.

    Elves, even though they are more noble and pure than hobbits, are nevertheless more *potent* beings, and they exercise agency over their world frequently. And so, if for example, the Ring went to Galadriel, who cultivated the beautiful golden wood of Lothlorien, her actions would be to END Sauron--and so all her actions would be great, and just, until eventually they would start to turn. To quote the most epic speech in the history of writing, whose memory alone is enough to give me shivers as I type it:

    "In the place of a Dark Lord you would have a Queen! Not dark; but beautiful and terrible as the Dawn! Treacherous as the Seas! Stronger than the foundations of the Earth! All shall love me and despair!"

    /shiver shiver shiver

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ohio, where we never have any adventures or do anything unexpected
    Posts
    4,646

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Quote Originally Posted by Elangr View Post
    Does anyone know why you are invisible when you put on the One Ring?
    First, allow me to direct you to this site, which offers a particularly nice answer to this question and many others.

    Now, let us explore this issue by examining the words of Tolkien himself, both through the lore and his discussions of it. First and foremost, his most direct answer to this question is to be found in what is perhaps his most famous letter, Letter 131, which now comprises much of the preface to the second edition of The Silmarillion.
    The chief power (of all the rings alike) was the prevention or slowing of decay (i.e. 'change' viewed as a regrettable thing), the preservation of what is desired or loved, or its semblance – this is more or less an Elvish motive. But also they enhanced the natural powers of a possessor – thus approaching 'magic', a motive easily corruptible into evil, a lust for domination. And finally they had other powers, more directly derived from Sauron ('the Necromancer': so he is called as he casts a fleeting shadow and presage on the pages of The Hobbit): such as rendering invisible the material body, and making things of the invisible world visible.
    The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien, Letter 131 - To Milton Waldman
    Simply put, the Ring acts as a transition between the ordinary, physical world and the unseen world of spirits. When the Ring is worn, the Ring-bearer is pulled out of their material existence and into this otherwise unseen realm. Gandalf provides further detail on this when he describes the nature of the Ring to Frodo.
    'A mortal, Frodo, who keeps one of the Great Rings, does not die, but he does not grow or obtain more life, he merely continues, until at last every minute is a weariness. And if he often uses the Ring to make himself invisible, he fades: he becomes in the end invisible permanently, and walks in the twilight under the eye of the dark power that rules the Rings. Yes, sooner or later - later, if he is strong or well-meaning to begin with, but neither strength nor good purpose will last - sooner or later the dark power will devour him.'
    The Fellowship of the Ring, Book I, Ch. 2: The Shadow of the Past
    Here it is first made clear that the effects of the Ring can be made permanent through its repeated use. While the bearer may seem to be rendered permanently invisible, in truth, he would be forever trapped in the spirit realm and left completely exposed and powerless to the will of Sauron.
    'I am old, Gandalf. I don't look it, but I am beginning to feel it in my heart of hearts. Well-preserved indeed!' he snorted. 'Why, I feel all thin, sort of stretched, if you know what I mean: like butter that has been scraped over too much bread. That can't be right. I need a change, or something.'
    The Fellowship of the Ring, Book I, Ch. 1: A Long-expected Party
    When Bilbo describes feeling "thin" and "stretched", it is easy to imagine that this is not only a consquence of his old age, but rather a literal description of the Ring's lasting effect upon him. In this regard, he feels 'stretched' because he has already been partially 'pulled' into the spirit world. We see something very similar occur with Frodo as he nears the end of his journey.
    'Do you remember that bit of rabbit, Mr. Frodo?' he said. 'And our place under the warm bank in Captain Faramir's country, the day I saw an oliphaunt?'

    'No, I am afraid not, Sam,' said Frodo. 'At least, I know that such things happened, but I cannot see them. No taste of food, no feel of water, no sound of wind, no memory of tree or grass or flower, no image of moon or star are left to me. I am naked in the dark. Sam, and there is no veil between me and the wheel of fire. I begin to see it even with my waking eyes, and all else fades.'

    [. . .]

    Then suddenly, as before under the eaves of the Emyn Muil, Sam saw these two rivals with other vision. A crouching shape, scarcely more than the shadow of a living thing, a creature now wholly ruined and defeated, yet filled with a hideous lust and rage; and before it stood stern, untouchable now by pity, a figure robed in white, but at its breast it held a wheel of fire. Out of the fire there spoke a commanding voice.

    'Begone, and trouble me no more! If you touch me ever again, you shall be cast yourself into the Fire of Doom.'
    The Return of the King, Book VI, Ch. 3: Mount Doom
    As the hobbits near Mount Doom, it becomes quite apparent that Frodo is suffering from his long exposure to the Ring. In his answer to Sam, we see that he has become so overburdened by its effects that he can no longer remember any experience of the physical world—neither the "taste of food", the "feel of water", nor the "sound of wind". He says also that he is "naked in the dark", that there is no longer a "veil between [him] and the wheel of fire", and that he can see it with his "waking eyes, and all else fades". For Frodo, there is no longer a separation of the realms. The barrier between the physical and spiritual has been all but pulled away leaving him completely and utterly exposed to the temptation and torment of the Ring. From his perspective, the rest of the world is fading because he is being drawn out of it and it is no longer a defining part of his existence. It is now only him and the Ring—two forces that end up, quite literally, standing on the precipice of doom!




    Quote Originally Posted by Al-Kamen View Post
    Hobbits being down to earth people of the soil with an inherent disbelief in anything magical are the most resistant to the effects of the ring
    For the most part, you are correct, though I think you have confused the attitude hobbits hold towards 'magic'. Much of the magic that is seen in the tale is seen from a hobbit perspective. Indeed, as Galadriel demonstrates, even the word itself is almost solely used by the Hobbits to describe the greater powers of the Elves and the Enemy.
    'And you? ' she said, turning to Sam. 'For this is what your folk would call magic. I believe; though I do not understand clearly what they mean; and they seem also to use the same word of the deceits of the Enemy. But this, if you will, is the magic of Galadriel. Did you not say that you wished to see Elf-magic?'
    The Fellowship of the Ring, Book II, Ch. 7: The Mirror of Galadriel
    Perhaps what you meant to suggest was that while Hobbits certainly believed in 'magic', they themselves possessed no natural aptitude for it. Tolkien tells us this quite plainly in his novel's prologue, Concerning Hobbits.
    They possessed from the first the art of disappearing swiftly and silently, when large folk whom they do not wish to meet come blundering by; and this an they have developed until to Men it may seem magical. But Hobbits have never, in fact, studied magic of any kind, and their elusiveness is due solely to a professional skill that heredity and practice, and a close friendship with the earth, have rendered inimitable by bigger and clumsier races.
    The Fellowship of the Ring, Prologue: Concerning Hobbits
    Finally, as I have already said, in one of Tolkien's letters he himself suggests that much of the magic in The Lord of the Rings can be interpreted as the uneducated report of Hobbits who fail to fully understand the forces at work around them.
    Anyway, a difference in the use of 'magic' in this story is that it is not to be come by by 'lore' or spells; but is in an inherent power not possessed or attainable by Men as such. Aragorn's 'healing' might be regarded as 'magical', or at least a blend of magic with pharmacy and 'hypnotic' processes. But it is (in theory) reported by hobbits who have very little notions of philosophy and science; while A. is not a pure 'Man', but at long remove one of the 'children of Luthien'.
    The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien, Letter 155 - To Naomi Mitchison (draft)




    Quote Originally Posted by Olaura View Post
    Then how is it that the shadow kings are visible, or Ring Wraiths are visable in this world.
    The Nazgûl, or Ring-wraiths, are not visible. In fact, Gandalf tells Frodo that they wear black robes "to give shape to their nothingness".
    'Yes, fortune or fate have helped you,' said Gandalf, 'not to mention courage. For your heart was not touched, and only your shoulder was pierced; and that was because you resisted to the last. But it was a terribly narrow shave, so to speak. You were in gravest peril while you wore the Ring, for then you were half in the wraith-world yourself, and they might have seized you. You could see them, and they could see you.'

    'I know,' said Frodo. 'They were terrible to behold! But why could we all see their horses?'
    'Because they are real horses; just as the black robes are real robes that they wear to give shape to their nothingness when they have dealings with the living.'
    The Fellowship of the Ring, Book II, Ch. 1: Many Meetings
    Later, when Gandalf confronts the Witch-king at the gates of Minas Tirith, the wraith removes his hood, leaving only a crown floating upon his invisible head.
    The Black Rider flung back his hood, and behold! he had a kingly crown; and yet upon no head visible was it set. The red fires shone between it and the mantled shoulders vast and dark. From a mouth unseen there came a deadly laughter.

    'Old fool!' he said. 'Old fool! This is my hour. Do you not know Death when you see it? Die now and curse in vain!' And with that he lifted high his sword and flames ran down the blade.
    The Return of the King, Book V, Ch. 4: The Siege of Gondor
    This image of the Witch-king stands in stark contrast to the one that is portrayed in Peter Jackson's adaptation. I find these conflicting concepts of the Witch-king rather fascinating. I enjoy them so much, in fact, that I even pieced together my own desktop image to exemplify the differences between the book and film.






    Quote Originally Posted by Silchas View Post
    Another interesting question is what exactly is this "shadow realm"? This other dimension so to speak. how does it fit into the Tolkien cosmology?
    This shadow realm is more properly referred to as the Wraith-world. In fact, Gandalf refers to it as such when he tells Frodo that while wearing the Ring "you were half in the wraith-world yourself". Tolkien says very little about this Wraith-world, but it appears to be a sort of supernatural, spirit realm that lies parallel to the natural world. There also appears to be a very strong connection between this spirit world and Sauron's Ring. What we do know is that this realm was inhabited by the forces of good and evil alike. We get our first hint of this when Frodo first sees Glorfindel.
    The rider's cloak streamed behind him, and his hood was thrown back; his golden hair flowed shimmering in the wind of his speed. To Frodo it appeared that a white light was shining through the form and raiment of the rider, as if through a thin veil.

    [. . .]

    With his last failing senses Frodo heard cries, and it seemed to him that he saw, beyond the Riders that hesitated on the shore, a shining figure of white light; and behind it ran small shadowy forms waving flames, that flared red in the grey mist that was falling over the world.
    The Fellowship of the Ring, Book I, Ch. 12: Flight to the Ford
    Here, Glorfindel is repeatedly described as a figure of white light. Frodo even perceives a light shining through him "as if through a thin veil". Take special note of the word 'veil', as it often appears in combination with descriptions of the Wraith-world. As quoted above, Frodo later uses it to describe his mental and spiritual proximity to the Ring as he approaches Mount Doom.
    'Yes, at present, until all else is conquered. The Elves may fear the Dark Lord, and they may fly before him, but never again will they listen to him or serve him. And here in Rivendell there live still some of his chief foes: the Elven-wise, lords of the Eldar from beyond the furthest seas. They do not fear the Ringwraiths, for those who have dwelt in the Blessed Realm live at once in both worlds, and against both the Seen and the Unseen they have great power.'

    'I thought that I saw a white figure that shone and did not grow dim like the others. Was that Glorfindel then?'

    'Yes, you saw him for a moment as he is upon the other side: one of the mighty of the Firstborn. He is an Elf-lord of a house of princes. Indeed there is a power in Rivendell to withstand the might of Mordor, for a while: and elsewhere other powers still dwell.

    [. . .]

    Gandalf moved his chair to the bedside, and took a good look at Frodo. The colour had come back to his face, and his eyes were clear, and fully awake and aware. He was smiling, and there seemed to be little wrong with him. But to the wizard's eye there was a faint change just a hint as it were of transparency, about him, and especially about the left hand that lay outside upon the coverlet.
    The Fellowship of the Ring, Book II, Ch. 1: Many Meetings
    When Frodo awakes in the House of Elrond, Gandalf acknowledges his visions and informs him that Glorfindel does indeed inhabit a dual nature. He further explains that this is true of all elves who have ever lived in Valinor, "for those who have dwelt in the Blessed Realm live at once in both worlds".

    As their discussion concludes, we are told that "to the wizard's eye" Frodo appeared to exhibit "a hint ... of transparency". This was almost certainly the result of his encounter with the Nazgûl and the Morgul-wound that he carried henceforth. Indeed, we know that, like the Ring, the Ring-wraiths also harbored the power to pull the living into the Wraith-world. Sam learns as much when he overhears the orc Gorbag near the Tower of Cirith Ungol.
    'No, I don't know,' said Gorbag's voice. 'The messages go through quicker than anything could fly, as a rule. But I don't enquire how it's done. Safest not to. Grr! Those Nazgûl give me the creeps. And they skin the body off you as soon as look at you, and leave you all cold in the dark on the other side.
    The Two Towers, Book IV, Ch. 10: The Choices of Master Samwise
    [COLOR=yellowgreen][B]"Pure creation is like a vacation."[/B][/COLOR]
    [INDENT]- Welby of Landroval[/INDENT]

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Florida, United States
    Posts
    170

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Thank you so much guys. this is all very interesting to read! I've just started the silmarillion and was particularly fascinated by Ainulindale at the beginning... I have the same question... where does tolkein describe (or would describe somewhere esle) this "shadow realm" that the ring wraiths are in?


    .

  11. #11

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    great post Reddhawk!

  12. #12

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    I don't think it was explained why that is one of the powers only that it is. Even the whole shadow realm isn't much explained only that the wraiths are stuck somewhere between living and dead. I think the part that makes you invisible is really the power of the ring to dominate others will. So putting it on makes you make others not see you. If that makes sense. In the books Tom Bombadil can still see Frodo while others can't because he can't be dominated. Similarly Samwise can't see Galadriel's ring but Frodo can. The effects of the ring seem to have given Frodo the ability to block Galadriel's ring's power over him.

    The shadow realm stuff, I image it's just Sauron's power getting stronger so he can sense you more. Bilbo didn't have this problem in the Hobbit.

    What is interesting is that in the books Glorfindel appears as a shining white figure while Frodo is wearing the ring (in the movies it's Arwen). It's been discussed on some other forums that this is probably because Glorfindel has seen the light of the trees in Valinor (not to mention he died fighting a Balrog and came back too, like Gandalf) and can walk in both worlds at once.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    Posts
    7,563

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Quote Originally Posted by BigLotroFan View Post
    In the books Tom Bombadil can still see Frodo while others can't because he can't be dominated.
    I won't bother re-explaining everything Reddhawk just posted, but this is partly incorrect. You're right about Tom - Tom possesses a power unique to Middle-earth in that no outside power has any effect on him. But the Ring's power to dominate wasn't what caused the invisibility.

    I think Tom may have existed in both the physical and spiritual realm at the same time, the way an Elf Lord like Glorfindal did. That would explain to some extent why he was so powerful, and why he could see Frodo when Frodo was pulled into the spirit realm by the Ring. To someone who exists in both places, there wouldn't be a noticeable change in someone when they went from one place to the other.

    Quote Originally Posted by BigLotroFan View Post
    Similarly Samwise can't see Galadriel's ring but Frodo can. The effects of the ring seem to have given Frodo the ability to block Galadriel's ring's power over him.
    Galadriels ring had no power over either of them. That wasn't the nature of the Elven rings. They were designed to preserve, not to dominate.

    Frodo noticed the ring because;
    1. He had very nearly been turned into a wraith, so his perception of that sort of thing was greatly enhanced.
    2. bearing the One Ring gave a similar enhancement to his senses.
    3. He was a ring bearer - most of his existence at the time was concerned with worrying about rings. When your main concern is a ring, you'll notice a ring far more easily than most other people will.

    Also, it was never stated that Sam couldn't see her ring; he just didn't notice it.
    [center]"The rejection of grammatical correction is proof of the level of intelligence hinted at by your writing."

    [color=orange]Now please keep this discussion on topic or you may be reported for causing time mismanagement[/color]

    [color=gray]Llydia[color=blue] - 65 Rune-keeper |[/color]Dawnn [color=blue] - 65 Champion |[/color] Anthari[color=blue] - 65 Lore-master |[/color] Thisnameisavailable Ornot[color=blue] - 65 Guardian
    [/color] Firstaidkit[color=blue] - 65 Minstrel |[/color] Malaysia [color=blue] - 65 Waden |[/color] Kornur[color=blue] - 52 Hunter |[/color] Caly[color=blue] - 40 Burglar |[/color] Dharkan Rahl[color=blue] - 40 Captain[/color][/color][/center]

  14. #14

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    It wasn't that he just didn't notice it, he couldn't see it and actively tried looking for it when Frodo and Galadriel were having their conversation about right in front of him.

    And did you not see and recognize the ring upon my finger? Did you see my ring?” she asked turning again to Sam.
    “No, Lady,” he answered, “To tell you the truth, I wondered what you were talking about. I saw a star through your finger. But if you’ll pardon my speaking out, I think my master was right. I wish you’d take his Ring.
    I never said it was Galadriel's ring that was dominating Sam but she was obviously using a power to conceal it, a power that could not overcome the added perception Frodo gained from having the ring.

  15. #15

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Quote Originally Posted by Andjay View Post
    great post Reddhawk!
    agreed, I'd hand out rep but I need to spread some around first.
    "You can't fight the Enemy with his own Ring without turning into an Enemy" - J.R.R. Tolkien, Letter # 81



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    Posts
    7,563

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Quote Originally Posted by Reddhawk View Post
    This image of the Witch-king stands in stark contrast to the one that is portrayed in Peter Jackson's adaptation. I find these conflicting concepts of the Witch-king rather fascinating. I enjoy them so much, in fact, that I even pieced together my own desktop image to exemplify the differences between the book and film.

    I'm confused... How do the two images differ (the two meaning the one from the book, an PJ's - yours obviously differ )?

    The Witch King's crown in the movie might be a lot more war-like than you imagined, but it's still very much a crown, and he definitely had no visible head underneath it.
    [center]"The rejection of grammatical correction is proof of the level of intelligence hinted at by your writing."

    [color=orange]Now please keep this discussion on topic or you may be reported for causing time mismanagement[/color]

    [color=gray]Llydia[color=blue] - 65 Rune-keeper |[/color]Dawnn [color=blue] - 65 Champion |[/color] Anthari[color=blue] - 65 Lore-master |[/color] Thisnameisavailable Ornot[color=blue] - 65 Guardian
    [/color] Firstaidkit[color=blue] - 65 Minstrel |[/color] Malaysia [color=blue] - 65 Waden |[/color] Kornur[color=blue] - 52 Hunter |[/color] Caly[color=blue] - 40 Burglar |[/color] Dharkan Rahl[color=blue] - 40 Captain[/color][/color][/center]

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ohio, where we never have any adventures or do anything unexpected
    Posts
    4,646

    Talking Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Quote Originally Posted by sir-rinthian View Post
    I'm confused... How do the two images differ (the two meaning the one from the book, an PJ's - yours obviously differ )?

    The Witch King's crown in the movie might be a lot more war-like than you imagined, but it's still very much a crown, and he definitely had no visible head underneath it.
    Personally, I'd call it more of a helm, though upon closer inspection it does seem to be a sort of stylized crown. At any rate, the face mask doesn't leave much of a void below the crown and certainly not the sort of space in which Tolkien says that "red fires shone between it and the mantled shoulders". I think the crown that the Witch-king is seen wearing during the attack on Weathertop would have been far more appropriate and far more consistent had it been worn throughout the remainder of the films.

    For reference on the other crown:



    My other issue was with the flaming sword. Having gone back and double checked however, it does seem to make an appearance during one of the extended edition scenes. Still, if memory serves, it is sorely lacking in the original theatrical release. Regardless, even in the enhanced scene, there is no flinging back of the Witch-king's hood. As he flies down to confront Gandalf, his "crown" is already prominently displayed.

    Overall, you are right: the differences aren't quite as striking as I had recalled. Even so, there is still more than enough room for detailed nitpicking.
    [COLOR=yellowgreen][B]"Pure creation is like a vacation."[/B][/COLOR]
    [INDENT]- Welby of Landroval[/INDENT]

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    Posts
    7,563

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Quote Originally Posted by Reddhawk View Post
    Personally, I'd call it more of a helm, though upon closer inspection it does seem to be a sort of stylized crown.
    It seems to be designed to serve both purposes. It sort of reminds me of the King's crown from the Russel Crowe Robin Hood film - a crown, but a very militarized crown.

    Looking closely at it, it seems to have no top portion like a real helmet would need. Almost like it's floating on top of his hood.

    Quote Originally Posted by Reddhawk View Post
    My other issue was with the flaming sword. Having gone back and double checked however, it does seem to make an appearance during one of the extended edition scenes. Still, if memory serves, it is sorely lacking in the original theatrical release. Regardless, even in the enhanced scene, there is no flinging back of the Witch-king's hood. As he flies down to confront Gandalf, his "crown" is already prominently displayed.
    Also, they are in the wrong spot... And they confront each other a bit more violently than they did in the books.

    I've never liked the idea of the Witch King being more powerful than Gandalf. No man, whether he be alive, dead, wraith, or sorcerer, should be more powerful than a Maia.
    Last edited by sir-rinthian; Sep 27 2011 at 11:45 PM.
    [center]"The rejection of grammatical correction is proof of the level of intelligence hinted at by your writing."

    [color=orange]Now please keep this discussion on topic or you may be reported for causing time mismanagement[/color]

    [color=gray]Llydia[color=blue] - 65 Rune-keeper |[/color]Dawnn [color=blue] - 65 Champion |[/color] Anthari[color=blue] - 65 Lore-master |[/color] Thisnameisavailable Ornot[color=blue] - 65 Guardian
    [/color] Firstaidkit[color=blue] - 65 Minstrel |[/color] Malaysia [color=blue] - 65 Waden |[/color] Kornur[color=blue] - 52 Hunter |[/color] Caly[color=blue] - 40 Burglar |[/color] Dharkan Rahl[color=blue] - 40 Captain[/color][/color][/center]

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    143

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Quote Originally Posted by Elangr View Post
    Does anyone know why you are invisible when you put on the One Ring?

    .
    because then you are married and covered by your big beautiful wife
    Gilrain Vet, loving the server and I am glad that some people left it.
    Konungald on freeps, Idieanyway on creeps

  20. #20

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Quote Originally Posted by sir-rinthian View Post
    Also, they are in the wrong spot... And they confront each other a bit more violently than they did in the books.

    I've never liked the idea of the Witch King being more powerful than Gandalf. No man, whether he be alive, dead, wraith, or sorcerer, should be more powerful than a Maia.
    I had the same problem at first seeing the extended scene. It just looks like the Witch-king is going to wipe the floor with Gandalf. But then again you may be mistaken and the scene could have been a bit like the extended scene if Tolkien would have let it develop further.

    Two reasons for this:

    1) (I'd go for this one.) This spot of Gandalf's confrontation with the Witch-king is the very spot on Middle-Earth that you'd expect Sauron's eye to be focused on. It's what could determine the outcome of the whole conflict, so Sauron's power is present and maybe it's that which Gandalf is facing here and not just the Witch-king.

    2) (Also highly likely.) The Witch-king is not just a man who goes on beyond life and death. His innate power as an ex-numenorian king or whatever might be interesting but not nearly interesting enough in this context. Rather the true power of the Witch-king, overall, comes from the Ring and/or Sauron, which makes him into a very powerful and formidable creature. Considering that the Witch-king repeatedly was the #1 instrument of Sauron's plans, it would be very probable that Sauron poured some of his personal power into this particular nazgul.
    Last edited by Celefinel; Oct 01 2011 at 07:26 PM.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Florida, United States
    Posts
    170

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Another question. Why didnt Bilbo notice anything different when he put the ring on? except that he was invisible. In The Hobbit he even forgets he has it on!
    [charsig=http://lotrosigs.level3.turbine.com/022040000001fb4ca/01007/signature.png]undefined[/charsig]
    If you like my post, please +1 reputation!

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    Posts
    7,563

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Quote Originally Posted by Elangr View Post
    Another question. Why didnt Bilbo notice anything different when he put the ring on? except that he was invisible. In The Hobbit he even forgets he has it on!
    The effect of being dragged into the spiritual realm was clearly not as scary or noticeable as Peter Jackson made it out to be.

    Still, you would think there would be some difference you could see or feel... Definitely an interesting question.
    [center]"The rejection of grammatical correction is proof of the level of intelligence hinted at by your writing."

    [color=orange]Now please keep this discussion on topic or you may be reported for causing time mismanagement[/color]

    [color=gray]Llydia[color=blue] - 65 Rune-keeper |[/color]Dawnn [color=blue] - 65 Champion |[/color] Anthari[color=blue] - 65 Lore-master |[/color] Thisnameisavailable Ornot[color=blue] - 65 Guardian
    [/color] Firstaidkit[color=blue] - 65 Minstrel |[/color] Malaysia [color=blue] - 65 Waden |[/color] Kornur[color=blue] - 52 Hunter |[/color] Caly[color=blue] - 40 Burglar |[/color] Dharkan Rahl[color=blue] - 40 Captain[/color][/color][/center]

  23. #23

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Quote Originally Posted by sir-rinthian View Post
    The effect of being dragged into the spiritual realm was clearly not as scary or noticeable as Peter Jackson made it out to be.

    Still, you would think there would be some difference you could see or feel... Definitely an interesting question.
    Well we all know the real reason is because it wasn't conceived as the One Ring of Power at the time The Hobbit was written. It was a device to help Bilbo in his role as Burglar while his personal growth and confidence in his abilities developed.

    We can theorize that Sauron wasn't powerful enough yet for the Ring to be exerting it's power, it was only just beginning to stir - remember the White Council was about to drive him out of Dol Guldur. (Partially a tactical retreat but he still wasn't ready to challenge.) Also Bilbo received the Ring via accident, not murder (like Gollum) or claimed it because it was a token of power (Isildur). When he used it, it was usually not in malice. Protecting himself from harm without doing harm (except the Spiders) or to help others (the Dwarves). Bilbo's intentions kept him better grounded in the real world so it took much longer for the Ring to affect him.

    There's also a letter by Tolkien where he talks about how the Ring offers you what you want which becomes the slippery slope that traps you (Tolkien would NEVER use the word 'slippery slope' just my modern terminology). Bilbo only wanted to live a quiet life in the Shire. No adventures, just friends, food, a cup of tea, mug of ale and a good pipe.
    "You can't fight the Enemy with his own Ring without turning into an Enemy" - J.R.R. Tolkien, Letter # 81



  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Bucks County PA
    Posts
    1,818

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Tuor I agree with you that Sauron was weakened and that it contributed to why Bilbo used the ring without the more dire effects that Frodo experienced. Sauron was far removed from his full power, was busy with other things, and still thought the One Ring was lost somewhere. Accordingly when Bilbo used the the ring, his presence in the shadow world was diminished and his will was not focused on the ring.

    I am sure Bilbo noticed some definite changes when he put on the ring, but to Bilbo, these were just the side effects of going invisible. I'm sure material people and objects were less distinct, perhaps even fuzzy/blurry and things from the shadow world would be more distinct, but Bilbo would have just attributed it to an aspect of going invisible. He didn't know it was the master ring, or even a ring of power, so the idea of claiming it never occurred to him.

    The PJ effects, although a little over the top, are probably closer to what Frodo would have experienced after Sauron was in full power, has focused his will on the ring, and knew the ring had gone to the Shire and was carried by a hobbit that traveled to Rivendell with a few powerful friends.

  25. #25

    Re: Why does the One Ring make you invisible when you put it on?

    Quote Originally Posted by tuor66 View Post
    Well we all know the real reason is because it wasn't conceived as the One Ring of Power at the time The Hobbit was written. It was a device to help Bilbo in his role as Burglar while his personal growth and confidence in his abilities developed.
    Don't forget that when Tolkien rewrote the "Riddles in the dark" chapter he had the opportunity to address things like that as well. Personally I agree with the theory that Sauron had not yet reached the pinnacle of his powers, therefore the full effects of being dragged into the spirit world are not quite as noticable. Add to that the fact that it was totally dark in the tunnels the first time Bilbo wore the Ring, thus negating the effects on a person's visual perception of the "normal" world, as described when Frodo first wore the Ring on Weathertop.
    “If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went.”
    - Will Rogers

 

 
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

This form's session has expired. You need to reload the page.

Reload