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  1. #1976
    Quote Originally Posted by Al. View Post
    You said jetty was geographical previously, you aren't changing it are you?
    He's not changing anything as I see it:
    Quote Originally Posted by Duathrandir View Post
    Aideani and Al, negative on both. Al, geographically (were I going for that) jetty wouldn't equate to island, but rather to cape or peninsula.
    Note the were I going for that in his reply, indicating that he is NOT going for geographically.

    As for answering the riddle, I will admit to being stumped on this one. Jetty had me thinking of a port city such as Umbar, Pelargir, or Lond Daer that might have a large pier or whaft, but my limited research thus far hasn't turned up anything...

  2. #1977
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duathrandir View Post
    It is not indeed correct. In fact, one might say it is incorrect indeed. In the case of my riddle rake is a noun not a verb. Jetty is also a noun though not geological nor geographical. The answer is but a single word.
    Wilros, he changed it maybe unconcsiously. Now the riddle is Jetty noun (peninsulaor cape) and Rake noun.
    Last edited by Al.; Oct 02 2013 at 05:46 PM.

  3. #1978
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    Ill go for cape of forochel or short forochel

  4. #1979
    Peer?

    Moor werds

  5. #1980
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duathrandir View Post
    Aideani and Al, negative on both. Al, geographically (were I going for that) jetty wouldn't equate to island, but rather to cape or peninsula.
    As Wil' said, I did not change. I was never thinking geographical or geological. Think of non-geographical/non-geological prominence/jetty/cape/peninsula/protuberance that sticks out. Think unconventionally

  6. #1981
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfhelm View Post
    Peer?

    Moor werds
    A jetty might be a pier (though not in this case) but never a peer (which is a person of equal, legal status, ability, or social standing, or a Duke, Marquis, Earl, Viscount, or Baron).

  7. #1982
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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by Al. View Post
    A hint?
    A hint? he says. I have already provided three hints. I told you it was NOT geographical and re-iterated that. I told you it was two nouns, no verbs. I told you the answer was a single word. I will take pity upon you and make it too easy. the single word is the moniker of a character in LotR. There's your fourth hint, now solve it!

  8. #1983
    Quote Originally Posted by Duathrandir View Post
    A jetty might be a pier (though not in this case) but never a peer (which is a person of equal, legal status, ability, or social standing, or a Duke, Marquis, Earl, Viscount, or Baron).
    Obviously a pier is a jetty, I know how to spell
    The reason for the spelling was that a rake can also mean a fashionable or wealthy man, in other words a peer in society.

    Anyway I'm going to guess Meriadoc.

  9. #1984
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    I thought Baggins

    But Ill go for peregrin "pippin"

  10. #1985
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfhelm View Post
    Obviously a pier is a jetty, I know how to spell
    The reason for the spelling was that a rake can also mean a fashionable or wealthy man, in other words a peer in society.

    Anyway I'm going to guess Meriadoc.
    I see. A little touchy eh? A rake can also be many things but I had not heard the fashionable or wealthy man angle before.

  11. #1986
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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by Al. View Post
    I thought Baggins

    But Ill go for peregrin "pippin"
    Based upon what? No, that is not correct. Wolfhelm the touchy is kind of on the right track as he is thinking of synonyms.
    You do realize I'm just having fun, right, Wolfy?

  12. #1987
    Quote Originally Posted by Duathrandir View Post
    I see. A little touchy eh? A rake can also be many things but I had not heard the fashionable or wealthy man angle before.
    Nothing touchy in my reply, not intentionally so anyway. At the risk of sounding condescending, you see that little winky symbol in my post?, that is intended to imply that there was no offence intended, at least most people take it to mean that

  13. #1988
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfhelm View Post
    Nothing touchy in my reply, not intentionally so anyway. At the risk of sounding condescending, you see that little winky symbol in my post?, that is intended to imply that there was no offence intended, at least most people take it to mean that
    Ah very good. I must confess I had not noticed the winky smiley thing. I use the mr.cool smiley w/ the shades to the same end. We're cool bro' just yankin' yer chain.
    I pro'ly shouldn't offer another hint so soon, but it is no hobbit.

  14. #1989
    Quote Originally Posted by Duathrandir View Post
    As Wil' said, I did not change. I was never thinking geographical or geological. Think of non-geographical/non-geological prominence/jetty/cape/peninsula/protuberance that sticks out. Think unconventionally
    Wormtongue?
    Worm as an epithet for a contemptible person similar to rake.
    Tongue in the sense of a tongue of land, i.e. a thin projecting peninsula

  15. #1990
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ceredig View Post
    Wormtongue?
    Worm as an epithet for a contemptible person similar to rake.
    Tongue in the sense of a tongue of land, i.e. a thin projecting peninsula
    Ding ding ding ding! You are correct. Worm (rake; a contemptible person) tongue (jetty; a protuberance) Wormtongue.

  16. #1991
    Whew, was starting to think really weird relations like rakes and worms both aerate soil.

    Ok, the thread is Two Word Trivia but it does not say two word ENGLISH trivia. For the second word, google is your friend.


    Edwardian anhaga

  17. #1992
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ceredig View Post
    Whew, was starting to think really weird relations like rakes and worms both aerate soil.

    Ok, the thread is Two Word Trivia but it does not say two word ENGLISH trivia. For the second word, google is your friend.


    Edwardian anhaga
    Anhaga is Olde English and as near as I can tell it means solitary, recluse, loner. The Edwardian period of the U.K. was a period of high society and fashion. Ranking gentlemen engaged in sports by way of recreation and fashionable outfits were a mark of social standing, blabbedy blah blah blah independently wealthy blah blah. An independently wealthy, fashionable recluse; I guess Bilbo Baggins. Stab in the dark. Probably wrong.

  18. #1993
    You are half-way there with mentioning anhaga as Old English.
    Edwardian is a historical reference but not to that period of English history.

  19. #1994
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    Hmmm, how about Aragorn?
    "Just like Mary Shelly, Just like Frankenstein, Break your chains, And count your change, And try to walk the line"

  20. #1995
    Quote Originally Posted by Boraxxe View Post
    Hmmm, how about Aragorn?
    Your rationale?

  21. #1996
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ceredig View Post
    Your rationale?
    Aha!
    I knew you would expect an explanation...

    Anhaga; a wanderer, lone explorer...certainly describes Aragorn in his earlier years.

    Edwardian? A period of change. One ruling class gives way to a new one. A new era is unfolding.
    This describes what happened in middle-earth at the end of the Third Age.
    "Just like Mary Shelly, Just like Frankenstein, Break your chains, And count your change, And try to walk the line"

  22. #1997
    Quote Originally Posted by Boraxxe View Post
    Aha!
    I knew you would expect an explanation...

    Anhaga; a wanderer, lone explorer...certainly describes Aragorn in his earlier years.

    Edwardian? A period of change. One ruling class gives way to a new one. A new era is unfolding.
    This describes what happened in middle-earth at the end of the Third Age.
    Your answer is correct though I was looking for Edwardian in the sense of an Edwardian epithet: namely Edward I's well known epithet of Longshanks which Aragorn also possessed.

  23. #1998
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ceredig View Post
    Your answer is correct though I was looking for Edwardian in the sense of an Edwardian epithet: namely Edward I's well known epithet of Longshanks which Aragorn also possessed.
    Well, I was half-right anyway.
    I appreciate the concession. Thanks.
    Or maybe not...now I hafta think up a new one!

    Well, here's an easy one to keep things moving...

    skeletal burglary
    Last edited by Boraxxe; Oct 10 2013 at 01:12 AM. Reason: Changed a word
    "Just like Mary Shelly, Just like Frankenstein, Break your chains, And count your change, And try to walk the line"

  24. #1999
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ceredig View Post
    Your answer is correct though I was looking for Edwardian in the sense of an Edwardian epithet: namely Edward I's well known epithet of Longshanks which Aragorn also possessed.
    Ha, I actually thought of Edward the Longshanks and eventually would have remembered Bill Ferny calling Strider Longshanks. Good job Boraxxe. Good riddle too.

  25. #2000
    Quote Originally Posted by Boraxxe View Post
    Well, here's an easy one to keep things moving...

    skeletal burglary
    I reckon this is from Sam's Troll Song that he makes up when Strider and the hobbits find Bilbo's trolls.

    In the song the troll has nicked a bone from Tom Bombadil's uncle.

 

 
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