We have detected that cookies are not enabled on your browser. Please enable cookies to ensure the proper experience.
Page 14 of 14 FirstFirst ... 4 10 11 12 13 14
Results 326 to 346 of 346

Thread: Naming Your Elf

  1. #326
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Sunny SoCal, USA
    Posts
    6,459
    I put my name answers in your quote boxes in italics. Something you need to keep in mind is that in place names that were two Sindarin words, the adjective came after the noun, not before like in most of your names. For Elvish names, it seems they'd go more on what it sounded better as rather that word order. That is why I showed alternatives to the words you picked when I thought the noun sounded as good or better in the front of the name.

    Quote Originally Posted by JFDCamara View Post

    Celegmyl (Celeg + m?l -> agile gull) Celegvyl, I think. Could be Celegmyl due to something like 'Imloth Melui', which 'resisted mutation to avoid confusion'. Celegvyl's safer.
    Mylthir (M?l + thir -> gull look/expression) Correct, or Thirvyl
    Luinmyl (Luin + M?l -> blue gull) Luimmyl or Luimyl
    Berenmyl (Beren + M?l -> bold gull) Beremmyl or Beremyl
    Mylhwá (M?l + hwá -> gull breeze) Correct, since the 'c' doesn't seem to appear in triple consonant mutations. Hwavyl alternative.
    Glanmyl (Glân + m?l -> bright gull) Glammyl or Glamyl
    Fanuimyl (Fanui + m?l -> cloudy gull) If it follows the same Sindarin rules as the Arnorian kings, Fanuivyl.
    Haemyl (Hae + m?l -> distant gull) If it follows the same Sindarin rules as the Arnorian kings, Haevyl.
    Glamrenmyl (Glamren + m?l -> echoing gull) Glamremmyl or Glamremyl
    Braigmyl (Braig + m?l -> fierce gull) Braigvyl, I think.
    Mylhith (M?l + hîth -> gull mist) Correct, since the 'c' doesn't seem to appear in triple consonant mutations.
    Hithuimyl (Hithui + m?l -> misty gull) If it follows the same Sindarin rules as the Arnorian kings, Hithuivyl.
    Faenmyl (Faen + m?l -> radiant gull) Faemmyl or Faemyl
    Cirionmyl (Cirion + m?l -> sailor gull) Ciriommyl or Ciriomyl
    Tinnumyl (Tinnu + m?l -> twilight gull) If it follows the same Sindarin rules as the Arnorian kings, Tinnuvyl
    Annuimyl (Annui + m?l -> western gull) If it follows the same Sindarin rules as the Arnorian kings, Annuivyl.
    Favorites: Mylthir, Glammyl. Mylthir sounds less feminine to me. Mylhir could also work, if you don't want 'thir' and want 'lord' instead.

    A boring hunter from Mirkwood like hundreds of others in the game (I blame Legolas). Initially I liked the name but with time I started to not like it. Apparently -anor is a female ending so it doesn't suit him anyway.
    You were told incorrectly. 'anor' means 'sun' and -or is rather masculine sounding, not feminine.

    Arrow is pilin which I don't like. I would like names related to forests and/or plants, or to hunter-like things.

    Maedeg (Maed + êg -> piercing thorn) Correct
    Braigpeng (Braig + peng -> wild bow) Braigbeng
    Calenpeng (Calen + peng -> green bow) Calenbeng or Pengalen
    Caleneg (Calen + êg -> green thorn) Correct or Egalen
    Laegeg (Laeg + êg -> sharp thorn) Correct or Eglaeg
    Calentauron (calen + tauron -> green forester) Calendauron or Taurgalenon
    Alwedtaur (alwed + taur -> fortunate forest) Alwedaur or Tauralwed
    Laindae (lain + dae -> free shadow) Tolkien resisted using the 'd' mutation in a lot of his own words, so it would probably be fine. Daelain sounds nicer though.
    Favorites: Pengalen or Daelain.

    3) Fathomir of Gondor (male captain)

    I don't like the name and will change it. I would like something related to hope or captain things (shield/sword/war stuff). If something ends in estel is it considered feminine?
    Aragorn's name as a child was Estel, but it depends more on what word it goes with more than anything.

    Amathestel (Amath + estel -> shield + hope, shield of hope? or is that Estelamath?) Either, though sound a little clunky.
    Idhrenhest (Idhren + hest -> thoughtful captain) 'c' not appearing in mutations was very prevalent in Gondor names, so correct. Or Hestidhren.
    Esteltull / Tullestel (estel + tull -> banner of hope?) If the word ended with a double consonant, the second letter fell always fell off. Often happened just in compounds in general, I cannot remember a double 'l' in a compound Sindarin name off the top of my head. Esteldul or Tulestel.
    Angrenhest (angren + hest -> iron captain) Correct, or Hestangren
    Annuihest (annui + hest -> western captain) Correct, or Hestannun (annun also meaning west)
    Faenhest (Faen + hest -> radiant captain) Correct
    Gaithrenhest (Gaithren + hest -> steel captain) Correct, or Hestaithren
    Tinnumegil (tinnu + crist -> twilight sword) Tinnugrist or Tinnuvegil
    Tinnuhest (tinnu + hest -> twilight captain) Correct

    I'm also open to suggestions
    Of those... I'm not sure if I am really fond of any of them. Hestannun if I had to choose. Consider maybe the word for warrior, magor. Or more words that are only one syllable long so the name is no longer than three syllables.

    If I'm wrong in any of these, those who know the more obscure exceptions and rules of Sindarin compounds, please chime in.

    RIP ELENDILMIR • Jingle Jangle
    Landroval
    : LAERLIN (Bio + Drawings) • LAERWEN • OLORIEL • AETHELIND (Bio + Drawing) • NETHAEL

  2. #327
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    172
    Thanks a lot for all your replies and insight!

    I agree with you both, Mylthir and Tinnuvyl are my favourites for the warden.
    For the captain my favourite is Tinnuvegil and to prevent characters with names too similar I may go for Mylthir in the warden.
    For the hunter my favourite is Daelain, I don't like the peng word.

    Fortunately Mylthir, Tinnuvegil and Daelain are available in the server I'm going to (Laurelin), so I'm lucky no one had the same ideas I had (with your help and suggestions too)

    Thanks!

  3. #328
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    318
    okay, so I'm thinking of creating a new toon (as if I really need another alt to add to my collection, but the idea hit and the toon is taking personality in my mind, so why fight the inevitable? )

    Anywho, he's going to be a Gondorian, but I want his name to be either the Sindarin equivalent of Henry or possibly John.

    I went to Council of Elrond, and they gave this as the equivalents:

    Henry: means "home ruler"; council of elrond gives Bargon

    John: means "God is gracious"; council of elrond gives Eruviluion meaning God is merciful, kind.


    For Henry, I'm a little confused how they come to Bargon. I was trying to follow the rules at Weebly's sindarin lessons page and using the words Bar (home) and Caun (ruler) from JM Carpenter's Sindarin to English dictionary (the latest dictionary I could find and which was based upon Hisweloke's dictionary), I would have thought it would be Canbar or Canbaron.



    For John, I see that viluion is the mutated form of milui, meaning kind. I could not find a word in Hisweloke's dictionary for "god". Eru is apparently actually Quenya, but I suppose it will work, or would I be better off using something like Taradar (lofty father) or perhaps Adar min menel (father in heaven) - or whatever would be Sindarin for "heavenly father"?

    I had always felt that there was a difference between the words "mercy" and "grace", with mercy basically meaning you don't get what was coming to you, sort of like leniency, while grace was more like getting what you don't deserve, or something along the line of benevolence or charity. So, I was wondering if there might be a better word to use for grace, rather than kind.

    Neither Gracious nor Grace appear Carpenter's dictionary or David Salo's A Gateway to Sindarin; however, I have a Quenya word list from the Ardalambion website which lists the Quenya translation for gracious to be "raina". Apparently, according to this list, gracious is defined as "smiling, sweetfaced". So with that in mind, I found in Carpenter's dictionary, that the word for smile is raida-; using Weebly's lessons on verbs, I see that the present participle of smile (smiling as an adjective) would then be raidol - right?

    Since Sindarin is descended from Quenya and many of its words are derived from Quenya, would it be possible to also make the claim that since the Quenya word for gracious also means smiling, that I could then use the Sindarin word for smiling to mean gracious as well? So, would Eruraidol (or Eruraidolion for the masculine version) work in that case, or should I stick with Eruvilui?

  4. #329
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Ohio River valley
    Posts
    268
    Well, if you will go with lowercase-g god, the Sindarin is balan, pl. belain, Vala or Valar.

    Oddly, Sindarin lacks a word for grace in the sense of gratitude, as well. There is no direct way to convey thanks in Elvish languages - make of that what you will!

    So a direct translation is pretty much not possible. You can however play with the thematic meaning of the name and construct something parallel.

    One such construct might be Belainvaer, "the gods are good".

    I may have more to suggest when I have time to really dig around and poke at it a bit.

  5. #330
    Quote Originally Posted by AllySanders View Post

    For Henry, I'm a little confused how they come to Bargon. I was trying to follow the rules at Weebly's sindarin lessons page and using the words Bar (home) and Caun (ruler) from JM Carpenter's Sindarin to English dictionary (the latest dictionary I could find and which was based upon Hisweloke's dictionary), I would have thought it would be Canbar or Canbaron.

    For John, I see that viluion is the mutated form of milui, meaning kind. I could not find a word in Hisweloke's dictionary for "god". Eru is apparently actually Quenya, but I suppose it will work, or would I be better off using something like Taradar (lofty father) or perhaps Adar min menel (father in heaven) - or whatever would be Sindarin for "heavenly father"?

    Neither Gracious nor Grace appear Carpenter's dictionary or David Salo's A Gateway to Sindarin; however, I have a Quenya word list from the Ardalambion website which lists the Quenya translation for gracious to be "raina". Apparently, according to this list, gracious is defined as "smiling, sweetfaced". So with that in mind, I found in Carpenter's dictionary, that the word for smile is raida-; using Weebly's lessons on verbs, I see that the present participle of smile (smiling as an adjective) would then be raidol - right?

    Since Sindarin is descended from Quenya and many of its words are derived from Quenya, would it be possible to also make the claim that since the Quenya word for gracious also means smiling, that I could then use the Sindarin word for smiling to mean gracious as well? So, would Eruraidol (or Eruraidolion for the masculine version) work in that case, or should I stick with Eruvilui?
    Looks strange seeing myself referred to as 'Carpenter' . Originally based on Hisweloke's yes, it's moved on a lot since then. Anyway!

    Bargon -> it's Bar = home, house + Caun = Prince. The 'au' diphthong becomes an 'o' when it's in a compound (if it's the second word of the two being put together). The 'c' of 'caun' then becomes a 'g' due to mutation.

    God -> you can either use Balan as the person above has suggested, or you can use Rodon = Ainu, or Iladar (the Sindarin form of Ilúvatar). Or, if you want the loan word, simply Eru though this does run the risk of being a homonym with a word for 'desert, waste'.

    Sindarin is not descended from Quenya, it actually took an entirely different linguistic evolutionary path (Common Eldarin -> Telerin instead of Common Eldarin -> Noldorin/Valarin Quenya).

    I think you must have an older version of my dictionary, as I do now have a reconstruction for 'grace', which is Bless. If you want the 2.5 edition, this is the link: Click to download
    Xandarien Elanessa, Híril of Pupils of the Istari on Evernight

    Sindarin Lessons

  6. #331
    Quick note on these names:

    Alwedtaur (alwed + taur -> fortunate forest) Alwedaur or Tauralwed. The 'au' collapses to an 'a' if it takes the first place and 'o' if it takes the second place word in a compound, making it Taralwed or Alwedor.
    Tinnuhest and Annuihest. Ordinarily, an 'h' does not mutate to 'ch' in names, Laire is quite correct, but the exception is if the 'h' follows a vowel making these Tinnuchest and Annuichest
    Xandarien Elanessa, Híril of Pupils of the Istari on Evernight

    Sindarin Lessons

  7. #332
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    318
    Quote Originally Posted by Xandarien_PoTI View Post
    Looks strange seeing myself referred to as 'Carpenter' . Originally based on Hisweloke's yes, it's moved on a lot since then. Anyway!

    Bargon -> it's Bar = home, house + Caun = Prince. The 'au' diphthong becomes an 'o' when it's in a compound (if it's the second word of the two being put together). The 'c' of 'caun' then becomes a 'g' due to mutation.

    God -> you can either use Balan as the person above has suggested, or you can use Rodon = Ainu, or Iladar (the Sindarin form of Ilúvatar). Or, if you want the loan word, simply Eru though this does run the risk of being a homonym with a word for 'desert, waste'.

    Sindarin is not descended from Quenya, it actually took an entirely different linguistic evolutionary path (Common Eldarin -> Telerin instead of Common Eldarin -> Noldorin/Valarin Quenya).

    I think you must have an older version of my dictionary, as I do now have a reconstruction for 'grace', which is Bless. If you want the 2.5 edition, this is the link: Click to download

    Thank you very much for the response!



    *grins* well, I was just going by the name on the Sindarin Dictionary that I got off Amazon and downloaded to my Kindle and what it said in the preface It's date is 2013, so yeah, it does appear that it's out of date since the one in the link is marked 2014 and 2nd edition.

    Thank you very, very much for that link! I had copied Hisweloke's dictionary to my hard drive as a word doc so I could search it, but it is getting dated. I found your dictionary on Amazon and downloaded it to my kindle, but I find it very difficult to search for a term in it; I don't care for how the kindle handles searches. I much, much prefer being able to search for a term in Word! I'm going to copy the Word doc to my kindle now! *does a little happy dance*


    Did Sindarin and Quenya descended from the original elven tongue, sort of like siblings of a common parent language? My knowledge of the internal and external lore of Middle Earth is patchy. I've read the Silmarillion a couple of times and have the information found therein pretty well memorized, but haven't read the Histories and get my information from them from Tolkien Gateway lol Dates and facts stick with me better than grammar rules and such, and I think a lot of what I had learned about Middle Earth is now quite dated.



    Back to my question:



    Iladar is Sindarin for Eru Iluvatar? That's good to know--I didn't know what the Sindarin name would be.



    looking at the link you provided, the Sindarin word for grace is bless? (Now that's confusing - and looking at my kindle version, its there, but I think the resemblance to English is what threw me off and I didn't catch it)


    The Council of Elrond's Sindarin workbook says that the suffix -eb added to a noun stem is equivalent to the English endings -al, -ious, -ing, -ed, and -ly as adjectival endings. the example they give that might apply is glory = aglar; glorious - aglareb. http://www.councilofelrond.com/reading/09-adjectives/

    The date for that workbook, however, is 2005. Is this still accurate information? And if so, would that mean that if grace = bless, the gracious = blesseb? And would that mean that to say gracious God, the construct would be Iladarvlesseb? or Perhaps stick with Erublesseb?




    I see also that the verb bless is aina- in Sindarin. If I wanted to say "God blesses" would it then be Iladaraina? Can you have a male name ending in a?




    For Henry: if Bargon = home + ruler, would it also be possible to use home as an adjective that follows the noun? So would Canbar also work and mean the same thing?




    Sorry for all the hassle! I'm trying to learn a bit about Sindarin grammar at the same time and understand the "why" something is the way it is!

  8. #333
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Sunny SoCal, USA
    Posts
    6,459
    Quote Originally Posted by AllySanders View Post
    Thank you very much for the response!


    The Council of Elrond's Sindarin workbook says that the suffix -eb added to a noun stem is equivalent to the English endings -al, -ious, -ing, -ed, and -ly as adjectival endings. the example they give that might apply is glory = aglar; glorious - aglareb. http://www.councilofelrond.com/reading/09-adjectives/
    When it comes to all nouns being turned into adjectives, I know that this is not completely correct. -ui is common for words like hithui (misty, foggy, with hith being fog/mist).



    For Henry: if Bargon = home + ruler, would it also be possible to use home as an adjective that follows the noun? So would Canbar also work and mean the same thing?
    If I recall correctly, the word home comes from the old stem MBAR, so if my cheat sheet's right, it'd be Caunmar --> Caummar, I believe. Possibly Caumar. I do know that n + m = at least one m, but I am uncertain from there xD Edit: Ah, Cammar/Camar, following the corrections in an earlier posts about 'au' I just read above!
    Last edited by Laire; Oct 09 2015 at 12:33 AM.

    RIP ELENDILMIR • Jingle Jangle
    Landroval
    : LAERLIN (Bio + Drawings) • LAERWEN • OLORIEL • AETHELIND (Bio + Drawing) • NETHAEL

  9. #334
    Quote Originally Posted by AllySanders View Post
    Thank you very much for the response!

    *grins* well, I was just going by the name on the Sindarin Dictionary that I got off Amazon and downloaded to my Kindle and what it said in the preface It's date is 2013, so yeah, it does appear that it's out of date since the one in the link is marked 2014 and 2nd edition.

    Thank you very, very much for that link! I had copied Hisweloke's dictionary to my hard drive as a word doc so I could search it, but it is getting dated. I found your dictionary on Amazon and downloaded it to my kindle, but I find it very difficult to search for a term in it; I don't care for how the kindle handles searches. I much, much prefer being able to search for a term in Word! I'm going to copy the Word doc to my kindle now! *does a little happy dance*


    Did Sindarin and Quenya descended from the original elven tongue, sort of like siblings of a common parent language? My knowledge of the internal and external lore of Middle Earth is patchy. I've read the Silmarillion a couple of times and have the information found therein pretty well memorized, but haven't read the Histories and get my information from them from Tolkien Gateway lol Dates and facts stick with me better than grammar rules and such, and I think a lot of what I had learned about Middle Earth is now quite dated.

    Back to my question:

    Iladar is Sindarin for Eru Iluvatar? That's good to know--I didn't know what the Sindarin name would be.

    looking at the link you provided, the Sindarin word for grace is bless? (Now that's confusing - and looking at my kindle version, its there, but I think the resemblance to English is what threw me off and I didn't catch it)


    The Council of Elrond's Sindarin workbook says that the suffix -eb added to a noun stem is equivalent to the English endings -al, -ious, -ing, -ed, and -ly as adjectival endings. the example they give that might apply is glory = aglar; glorious - aglareb. http://www.councilofelrond.com/reading/09-adjectives/

    The date for that workbook, however, is 2005. Is this still accurate information? And if so, would that mean that if grace = bless, the gracious = blesseb? And would that mean that to say gracious God, the construct would be Iladarvlesseb? or Perhaps stick with Erublesseb?

    I see also that the verb bless is aina- in Sindarin. If I wanted to say "God blesses" would it then be Iladaraina? Can you have a male name ending in a?

    For Henry: if Bargon = home + ruler, would it also be possible to use home as an adjective that follows the noun? So would Canbar also work and mean the same thing?

    Sorry for all the hassle! I'm trying to learn a bit about Sindarin grammar at the same time and understand the "why" something is the way it is!
    No hassle, I enjoy answering questions, now one at at time...

    Kindle - yeah, it's still on Edition 1.5, my aim is to push the update to Kindle by the end of the year (it's mostly done).

    Yes, both Quenya and Sindarin descend from a common ancestor. Back in the mists of time, the development went something (this is the linguistic development in Middle Earth not the outside real world development, which differs a bit) like this...
    Primitive Quendian -> Common Eldarin which then split into Prehistoric Quenya (which then further split into Vanyarin Quenya and Noldorin Quenya) and Telerin (which split into the various forms of Sindarin and Nandorin). So some vocabulary will always look as if it is related because it is, just sometimes quite a long way back.

    -eb is one of the older adjectival endings, and it's only attested in 5 places (only one of which, Aglareb, is the -ious ending in English). -ui is the more common later ending, and I would use this to give Blessui.

    If you wanted to say 'God blesses' as a sentence, then yes Iladar aina would be correct, but I wouldn't put a verb in a name. The ending does indeed look odd. (Male suffixes are -on, -ron, -ion, -hawn, -dir).

    Bargon the other way round - yip as Laire suspects it would be Canmar as Bar has what's called an MB root.
    Xandarien Elanessa, Híril of Pupils of the Istari on Evernight

    Sindarin Lessons

  10. #335
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    318
    Quote Originally Posted by Xandarien_PoTI View Post
    No hassle, I enjoy answering questions, now one at at time...

    Kindle - yeah, it's still on Edition 1.5, my aim is to push the update to Kindle by the end of the year (it's mostly done).

    Yes, both Quenya and Sindarin descend from a common ancestor. Back in the mists of time, the development went something (this is the linguistic development in Middle Earth not the outside real world development, which differs a bit) like this...
    Primitive Quendian -> Common Eldarin which then split into Prehistoric Quenya (which then further split into Vanyarin Quenya and Noldorin Quenya) and Telerin (which split into the various forms of Sindarin and Nandorin). So some vocabulary will always look as if it is related because it is, just sometimes quite a long way back.

    -eb is one of the older adjectival endings, and it's only attested in 5 places (only one of which, Aglareb, is the -ious ending in English). -ui is the more common later ending, and I would use this to give Blessui.

    If you wanted to say 'God blesses' as a sentence, then yes Iladar aina would be correct, but I wouldn't put a verb in a name. The ending does indeed look odd. (Male suffixes are -on, -ron, -ion, -hawn, -dir).

    Bargon the other way round - yip as Laire suspects it would be Canmar as Bar has what's called an MB root.

    Canmar I like way better than Bargon!

    I'd rather use blessui over blesseb anyway--the later doesn't flow very well. So using blessui, than can the final result be Iladarvlessuion? (assuming the b of blessui would lentiate to v following the r of Iladar?)


    Therefore, would my character than be Canmar of the house of Iladarvlessuion?

    (that will be my last question on the topic--I promise! )



    And duly noted on the incorrect information from the council's of Elrond's workbook! I'll avoid it, then, though I was hoping it was still good as it seemed more detailed than Weebly's workbooks, which I like but which confuse me greatly......

  11. #336
    Quote Originally Posted by AllySanders View Post
    Canmar I like way better than Bargon!

    I'd rather use blessui over blesseb anyway--the later doesn't flow very well. So using blessui, than can the final result be Iladarvlessuion? (assuming the b of blessui would lentiate to v following the r of Iladar?)


    Therefore, would my character than be Canmar of the house of Iladarvlessuion?

    (that will be my last question on the topic--I promise! )

    And duly noted on the incorrect information from the council's of Elrond's workbook! I'll avoid it, then, though I was hoping it was still good as it seemed more detailed than Weebly's workbooks, which I like but which confuse me greatly......
    If that's my website confusing you, please feel free to PM me with what confuses you and I'll have a look at what I can do to rewrite bits.

    Do you want the -on to indicate masculinity? In that case yip, that would be correct
    Xandarien Elanessa, Híril of Pupils of the Istari on Evernight

    Sindarin Lessons

  12. #337
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Still lost
    Posts
    475
    Here is a new player asking for naming help:

    Quote Originally Posted by ChickenLeg0 View Post
    Well I ended with choosing between Sindaris or Syndaris , for a female hunter elf of Mirkwood ...

    What do you think of these two ? Which one to choose ?
    Keep calm, and snuggle.

  13. #338
    Well unfortunately neither mean anything as such in Sindarin, though Sinda = Grey (or 'Grey Elf') in Quenya and Ris = ravine (or 'Queen' in Sindarin), so I would go for Sindaris over Syndaris.
    Xandarien Elanessa, Híril of Pupils of the Istari on Evernight

    Sindarin Lessons

  14. #339
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Sunny SoCal, USA
    Posts
    6,459
    I wonder if the Elvish experts here can help me with the name of my new blog. While I am fairly good at compounds, when it comes to what is plural and what is not, and more than one word, I start losing confidence... especially as the word I am looking for is not a simple word with a translation easily found.

    I am thinking of 'Untold Tales' or 'Book of Lost Tales' or simply 'Lost Tales'.

    What I do know, mostly from Hisweloke and the 'learning' sites:
    To tell: *nara- N. [n??r?] inf. naro N. [n??r?] pa. t. narante N. [n?r??nt?] v. Arch., Poet. to tell ? Ety/374, VT/45:36 ? *trenar- N. [tr??n?r] inf. treneri N. [tr??n?ri] pa. t. trenor N. [tr??n?r] (trener N.) v. to recount, to tell to end ? Ety/374
    not: al- N. [?l] pref. no, not ? Ety/367 ? ú S. [?u?] pref. no, not (negative prefix or particle) ? WJ/369, LotR/A(v)

    Tale is easy with narn, and tales with nern. Book is also easy with parf.

    Lost itself does not seem to exist, and I cannot find forgotten, missing, or similar synonyms. The only thing I could find was a Neo-Sindarin word for 'forget' at realelvish.net. 'Forget' was 'dadhren', but anyone have any idea for 'forgotten'? I also found 'lose' as danhir, another reconstructed word, but I do not know how much these are accepted in the community. Any advice?

    I think pa. t. above stands for past tense (but because it's so short, Google is not helping me there), so I think either 'narante' or 'trenor' is 'told'.

    So would Untold Tales be Nern únarante or Nern útrenor? Would the word 'untold also be plural with the noun? That is one thing I am completely uncertain of. If that's the case, then it would be... nern únerente or Nern útrenyr I think?

    I would really love to figure out what book of lost tales, or just 'lost tales' would be as well. Parf-e (en?) -nern-_________ I guess.

    Any help would be appreciated!
    Last edited by Laire; Oct 20 2015 at 11:37 PM.

    RIP ELENDILMIR • Jingle Jangle
    Landroval
    : LAERLIN (Bio + Drawings) • LAERWEN • OLORIEL • AETHELIND (Bio + Drawing) • NETHAEL

  15. #340
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Ohio River valley
    Posts
    268
    Bannen would seem to be the Sindarin participle cognate to Quenya "vanwa", Lost, Gone.

    A tale or history is Narn.

    Pluralize the forms, with modifier following the noun and you get Nern Vennin

    Or if you want "Untold", with the sense of "hardly told to anyone", instead of Lost, U-Nernnin

    Parf Nern Vennin

    or

    Parf Nern U-Nernnin
    Last edited by Aestivan; Oct 21 2015 at 03:50 AM.

  16. #341
    The verb 'to lose' is reconstructed as Danhir-.

    Parf Nern Dhanhirnen = Book of lost tales or Parf e-nern dhanhirnen = Book of the lost tales
    Xandarien Elanessa, Híril of Pupils of the Istari on Evernight

    Sindarin Lessons

  17. #342
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Sunny SoCal, USA
    Posts
    6,459
    I do like both Nern Vennin and Nern Dhanhirnen (though perhaps, to keep with Tolkien's spirit of his dislike of 'dh' in so many lenitions, I shall make it 'danhirnen!)

    Untold Tales would be more of the meaning I am aiming for (as in 'hardly told to anyone'), but Nern u-Nernnin sounds rather repetitive. Is there another word I can use for 'not told' and keep 'nern' out of the word for 'untold'? And would the prefix remain a separate word as such or would it be combined with the word like we do with many words in English? Or is that up to the writer?

    Thanks for your assistance!

    RIP ELENDILMIR • Jingle Jangle
    Landroval
    : LAERLIN (Bio + Drawings) • LAERWEN • OLORIEL • AETHELIND (Bio + Drawing) • NETHAEL

  18. #343
    Yes, you could use Trenar- = to recount a tale to the end (údrenarnen = untold) , or Ped- = to say (úbennen = unsaid).

    If ú is negating a word like here 'found, unfound' then it needs to remain an attached prefix otherwise it says 'not found'.
    Xandarien Elanessa, Híril of Pupils of the Istari on Evernight

    Sindarin Lessons

  19. #344

    Fairly easy:

    Just look at the names of the elves in the LOTR books such as Fingolfin, Glorfindel, Earendil , Gil galad etc etc.....

  20. #345
    Hi there. Not sure this thread is still going but I need some Sindarin expert help. The name for my character is Tinnurion, which means 'he who is crowned in twilight', or for the sake of brevity 'twilight garland'. I made the name with the help of an expert, but have since then done research of my own and now I'm in doubt. I know that most compound names undergo some form of mutation and in this case it seemingly doesn't. Tinnurion is much similar in construction to Galadriel where also no mutation occurs, yet the double 'n' is where I'm in doubt. Tinnu- literally means twilight and as a word it is closely related to Tinu- which means spark. I'm concerned that the meaning might be interpreted differently if I use Tinurion instead of Tinnurion, but the only attested compound name that uses Tinnu- in lotr is Tinúviel. Here is said that it is NOT a literal name but a poetic one Beren gave to Luthien. Therefore I wondered whether it actually counts as an example of how my name should be written, but still it is written with one 'n' and a stress on the second vowel. My question: is it okay to use my current name from a linguistic perspective? Or should I alter it? Many thanks

  21. #346
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    USA west coast
    Posts
    275
    Double N would not make your name innacurate from a philological point of view. I have characters where people in the know told me there were other variations possible depending on dialect and period (Elf languages mutate over time, like anyone else's- in Middle Earth mostly because Tolkien occasionally changed his mind about some rule.)-this might help to look at: https://eldamo.org/index.html

 

 
Page 14 of 14 FirstFirst ... 4 10 11 12 13 14

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

This form's session has expired. You need to reload the page.

Reload