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Thread: The Inklings

  1. #1
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    The Inklings

    The Inklings was an informal literary discussion group associated with the University of Oxford. Its members included J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Owen Barfield, and Charles Williams. A number of books have been written about this group and its members, including one by Tolkien’s biographer, Humphrey Carpenter. There is even an organization in the United States, The Mythopoeic Society, dedicated to studying their works. The Inklings met at several different locations over the years, but the best known spot was an Oxford pub called The Eagle and Child, known colloquially as ‘The Bird and Baby’.

    Did you know that prominent members of the Inklings, as well as the landmark pub they dined, are featured in LOTRO? They are found, appropriately enough, in The Shire. So where are they? In area known as the Bullroarer’s Sword in the North Farthing one may find a grey-haired pipe-smoking hobbit named Ronald Dwale. This is John Ronald Reuel Tolkien himself! (Tolkien was known by the first of this two middle names.)



    Ronald offers quest entitled Lost Dog. For those acquainted with the children’s story Roverandum, the storyline of this quest will be very familiar. Tolkien wrote this story in the mid-1920s for his son Michael, the same son who owned a Dutch doll that inspired the stories about an enigmatic character named Tom Bombadil.

    After completing 'Lost Dog' and the follow-up quest, Recovering the Lost Leaf, Ronald will offer you a quest, Missing the Meeting, that requires you to travel to a pub in Michel Delving known as 'The Bird and Baby'. (Sound familiar?)




    There you will find other members of The Inklings: Owen Farfield (Owen Barfield), Carlo Williams (Charles Williams), and Jack Lewisdown (C.S. Lewis, whose nickname was ‘Jack’).


  2. #2
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    Re: The Inklings

    Where does the Dwale name from from, if you know?
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  3. #3

    Re: The Inklings

    1. (adj) dwale
    the deadly nightshade (Atropa Belladonna), having stupefying qualities

    2. (adj) dwale
    the tincture sable or black when blazoned according to the fantastic system
    in which plants are substituted for the tinctures

    3. (adj) dwale
    a sleeping potion; an opiate

    Don't think there's a match there. Maybe it's just because it sounds similar to Reuel.
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  4. #4
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    Re: The Inklings

    these were added with the Evendim free content update...
    and i DO believe is mentioned in the stickied thread about hidden nuggets we see all the time.

    http://forums.lotro.com/showthread.php?t=80048


  5. #5
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    Re: The Inklings

    Quote Originally Posted by tuor66 View Post
    1. (adj) dwale
    the deadly nightshade (Atropa Belladonna), having stupefying qualities
    It is interesting to note that Belladonna Took was the name of Bilbo's mother.

  6. #6
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    Re: The Inklings

    Ronald Dwale's second quest is in Dwaling - a destroyed hobbit town he says has been "sold off" - now occupied by brigands. I suspect he's a refugee from Dwaling... the Dwales of Dwaling.

    There may be more to it, however. The second quest, entitled "Recovering the Lost Leaf", refers to a lost page of a story Ronald Dwale is writing for his children. Now that story may be Roverandum, as the OP noted. But here's something else - In a short novel called The Dwale Bluff written by Oliver Madox Brown in the 1870s, a lost dog leads a party of children into the forest, where one of them deliberately ingests "dwale" and dies. Oliver Madox Brown's father, Ford Madox Brown - a well-known Victorian painter, had business arrangements with Tolkien's maternal grandfather, who owned a book shop in Birmingham.

    And here's another item - "dwaling" is a Dutch Afrikaans word, from the root "dwalen". It means "to commit an error or a heresy" or "to have unusual or unorthodox opinions." It also can mean "wanderer" or "wandering". There is also a town in South Africa named "Dwaling", within a hundred miles of where Tolkien was born.

    Have no idea whether all of this means anything, or is simply a string of coincidences.

  7. #7
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    Re: The Inklings

    I remember the first time I saw the Inklings in game - I was really pleased that Turbine tipped their virtual hat this way to Tolkien & his group of friends. More hidden nuggets Turbine - add more!
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  8. #8
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    Re: The Inklings

    Thanks to this thread, my partner and I are now the proud owner of http://lorebook.lotro.com/wiki/Item:Ronald_Dwale's_Pipe

    I had done the quests in this area way back when and completely missed Ronald.

    Thanks old badgery one.
    "Just like Mary Shelly, Just like Frankenstein, Break your chains, And count your change, And try to walk the line"

  9. #9
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    Re: The Inklings

    Spent three years in Oxfrord in the seventies, and frequently sank a few in the Bird. Don't go back very often, but when I do I try to pop in and have a drink and a bite to eat. Nice old pub - was there last month, but sadly the kitchen wasn't open so had to lunch across the road in another typically old Oxford pub.

  10. #10

    Re: The Inklings

    Dwale comes from Dwalakoneis, the Gothic translation of Tolkien's own name.

  11. #11
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    Re: The Inklings

    Quote Originally Posted by Krondin View Post
    Spent three years in Oxfrord in the seventies, and frequently sank a few in the Bird. Don't go back very often, but when I do I try to pop in and have a drink and a bite to eat. Nice old pub - was there last month, but sadly the kitchen wasn't open so had to lunch across the road in another typically old Oxford pub.
    does the pub acknowledge Tolkien and his friends in any way?

  12. #12
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    Re: The Inklings

    O.O If I ever get a chance to go to UK, that pub is definitely going to be on my "must visit" -list.

    Quote Originally Posted by megaboy View Post
    does the pub acknowledge Tolkien and his friends in any way?
    Yes, it seems it does:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Eagle_and_Child

  13. #13
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    Re: The Inklings

    Quote Originally Posted by megaboy View Post
    does the pub acknowledge Tolkien and his friends in any way?
    I have a vague memory of a notice on the wall in one of the rooms mentioning Tolkien & Lewis, but I may be wrong. So, not entirely sure - sorry. Maybe someone on the forum who knows the place better....?

    If you ever get the chance, it's worth a visit as it is a nice old pub, with lots of small rooms ideal for small get-togethers. Just get there early to beat the (other) tourists.

    Edit:
    Ah - thanks Tharbad.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaimli View Post
    Dwale comes from Dwalakoneis, the Gothic translation of Tolkien's own name.
    The source for this comment, by the way, is a letter Tolkien wrote on 20 July 1965:

    I often put 'Gothic' inscriptions in books, sometimes Gothicizing my Norse name and German surname as Ruginwaldus Dwalakōneis.
    Source: '272 From a letter to Zillah Sherring', The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien

    I discovered this fact while reading a book my wife gave me for the holidays, Hobbit Place-names: A Linguistic Excursion through the Shire by Rainer Nagel. (These are the sorts of gifts one receives when one is a Tolkien nerd. )

    As for the etymology of Dwaling, Nagel states “the name has puzzled many a Tolkien scholar.” He continues, “One suggestion includes the word dwarf (or maybe even Dwalin) as a first element, combined with -ing to indicate ‘dwelling of.’” He also writes that it was “a simple variant of ‘dwelling’.” He further writes, “there is also the possibility that the name might be related to old-fashioned English dwale[…]referring to either a very intoxicating drink or, in most instances, to belladonna or nightshade.” ; tuor66 gave this definition in his post found above. Nagel states that the most likely solution is one given by Andreas Möhn,

    But maybe the answer is much more straightforward. In Dutch, a language that Tolkien had some familiarity with, dwaling means ‘error’.
    “This is not only the case in Dutch, but English (or rather, did) have a similar root as well: the Old English dwala ‘error,’”

    However, I’m not sure that I completely agree with Nagel’s assessment, for he later quotes Mark T. Hooker from A Tolkien Mathomium. A Collection of Articles about J.R.R. Tolkien and his Legendarium. Hooker believed that Tolkien tagged the common –ing suffix to the Gothicized translation of his surname as found in the letter quoted above. Nagel also quotes The Lord of the Rings: A Reader’s Companion by Hammond and Scull:

    Tolkien wrote that ‘according to English toponymy’ Dwaling ‘should be the settlement of (the descendents of) a person called Dwale, probably a nickname and therefore also uncomplimentary: older English dwale “dull”? The latter word is cognate with Gothic dwals ‘foolish’, which appears in Tolkien’s ‘Gothicization’ of his surname, Dwalakōneis
    For those not familiar with the translation of Tolkien, he provides it in a letter written in 1955:

    My name is TOLKIEN (not –kein). It is a German name (from Saxony), an anglicization of Tollkiehn, i.e., tollkühn. But, except as a guide to spelling, this fact is fallacious as all facts in the raw. For I am neither ‘foolhardy’ nor German, whatever some remote ancestors may have been.
    Source: '165 To the Houghton Mifflin Co.', The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien
    Last edited by oldbadgerbrock; Jan 12 2013 at 04:01 PM.

 

 

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