We have detected that cookies are not enabled on your browser. Please enable cookies to ensure the proper experience.
Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1

    A question for the beer experts

    ok, in the books, both beer/ale drinking and smoking pipeweed are a large part of life in Middle Earth.
    Just as in the Middle Ages, and if you read the book on the languages of Middle Earth, Middle Earth was a term used to refer to the area around England including parts of Europe.
    Based on that, what type of beer/ale/lager/pilsner would be the closest to what they would have drank in Middle Earth and/or the Middle Ages England?
    The reason I ask is that I really really like to drink a few "unique" beers/Ales/etc while playing as it kind of lends to the atmospshere.
    Also, in the movie and I think the books, Gimli made a comment about visting the dwarves and drinking "MALT BEER". What was he referring to?
    I dont think they had "malt liquor" back then.

    I did find a great link on how to make what would be an accurate representation of the Beer served in the Prancing Poney in Bree:

    http://www.maxbeer.org/eng/lord-rings-beer.htm

    Since I am not a home brewer, my search for a bottled brand may be fruitless...
    Last edited by Chipset; May 06 2009 at 05:13 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    The Green Dragon
    Posts
    209

    Re: A question for the beer experts

    Great post!

    To answer your questions (as simply as possible):

    1-The common brew of mediaeval England would have been ale: barley, water and yeast-no hops. Hops is an herb that makes the flavor bitter and acts as a preservative that came to be used in the renaissance and slowly gained in popularity. As far as pilsner/lager/etc. partially this is from the fermenting process, also the specific type of local gain that is used to brew ie: pilsner is/was first brewed from a grain local to Pilsen in the Czeck Republic, now it is a term to describe a style of beer.
    Although most brews today have some amount of hops in them, close ones to a more "traditional" brew would be Newcastle (in the ballpark) or Hen's Tooth and Old Speckled Hen (closer). And these ales usually tend to have a lower alcohol content due to the fermentation process. Sometimes they are referred to (esp in Shakespeare plays) as "small beer" which leads to question 2...

    2-Malting is simply part of the brewing process that you can do that ensures there is a higher sugar content remaining in your grain, which leads to more sugar your yeast can convert into alcohol, which leads to more nights you may end up on your knees bowing before the porcelain god. Gimli is letting us know that we are about to get hammered!

    Yes I am a homebrewer and i do imbibe from my own brews while playing sometimes. I would have gotten that Undying title if I wasn't a few pints into the adventure (true story).
    [CENTER][charsig=http://lotrosigs.level3.turbine.com/0620500000011bde3/01008/signature.png]Valenso[/charsig][/center]

  3. #3

    Re: A question for the beer experts

    Wow, great reply thanks!
    I actually bought the new castle u mentioned!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    1,373

    Re: A question for the beer experts

    Interesting posts. Never wondered much about it, but now that I think about it, I am a bit curious.
    Quote Originally Posted by Amra_the_Lion View Post
    I would have gotten that Undying title if I wasn't a few pints into the adventure (true story).
    LOL! I wonder if maybe a drink or two might've helped me gain that Undying title...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,637

    Re: A question for the beer experts

    Quote Originally Posted by Amra_the_Lion View Post
    2-Malting is simply part of the brewing process that you can do that ensures there is a higher sugar content remaining in your grain, which leads to more sugar your yeast can convert into alcohol, which leads to more nights you may end up on your knees bowing before the porcelain god. Gimli is letting us know that we are about to get hammered!
    Is malting usually associated with barley? (For the sugar, like you said) As in, could "malt beer" be similar to a barley beer ( Old Guardian by the Stone brewery, for example) or a barley wine?
    Last edited by Raath; May 10 2009 at 10:50 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    The Green Dragon
    Posts
    209

    Re: A question for the beer experts

    Quote Originally Posted by Raath View Post
    Is malting usually associated with barley? (For the sugar, like you said) As in, could "malt beer" be similar to a barley beer ( Old Guardian by the Stone brewery, for example) or a barley wine?

    All hail wiki!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beer

    This is a pretty good summary.
    [CENTER][charsig=http://lotrosigs.level3.turbine.com/0620500000011bde3/01008/signature.png]Valenso[/charsig][/center]

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    3 Garden St, Dunberth, Bree
    Posts
    1,006

    Re: A question for the beer experts

    I think Amra hit the nail on the head; glad to know we have an experienced brewer around!

    If you'd like a good read on the history of beer and its many styles have a gander at this one:The Good Beer Book, Timothy Harper.

    There is a great scene in The Shadow Lands where C.S. Lewis (Anthony Hopkins) is in a pub with a group of fellows -- I like to think they're the Inklings though there's no evidence -- and one of them comes back to the table with a few pints and says "Yuck, cold beer".

    I like to think cold beer and the importation of lager's and other foreign brews to be another tick on the long list of things that annoyed Tolkien in the 'de-anglization' of England category.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    The Jersey Shore
    Posts
    41

    Re: A question for the beer experts

    As earlier stated by Amra, Ale would have been the drink of choice. it is by far just plain easy to make. The yeast performs better in a warmer temperature generally 65-72 degrees. That temperature would have been easy to attain in an average "root cellar". On top of that, Ales can be flavored more easily and are way more forgiving to novice brewers. Lagers need a lower temp 50-55 degrees or little colder. it's all in the yeast. I think that the devs need to give ales a buff on fear for ales. take away some agility, but add some might (beer muscles) and add a little radiance.......I know there many....errr a few time in my life where that were the case.....

  9. #9

    Talking Re: A question for the beer experts

    Great initial post by Valenso, and a great discussion topic to the OP!

    To build on it, once you reach the areas to the northern latitudes nearing Forochel for example, a Honey Mead would be appropriate.
    [B]Magnarr [/B] - Lvl 85 Champion
    Leader, United Races (Vilya server)
    Cofounder and Leader, Vilya Alliance coalition of kinships
    [url]www.UnitedRaces.net[/url] [url]www.VilyaAlliance.com[/url]

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    The Green Dragon
    Posts
    209

    Re: A question for the beer experts

    Quote Originally Posted by Magnarr View Post
    To build on it, once you reach the areas to the northern latitudes nearing Forochel for example, a Honey Mead would be appropriate.
    Yeah that would have been better than ice wine. Maybe they'll serve it in the king's hall in Rohan.
    [CENTER][charsig=http://lotrosigs.level3.turbine.com/0620500000011bde3/01008/signature.png]Valenso[/charsig][/center]

  11. #11

    Re: A question for the beer experts

    So! What did you all end up buying/drinking?
    I tried Newcastle Brown Ale and Old Speckled Hen Ale based on my research that those two would be very close to what they drank in Middle Earth and/or The Shire.
    Personally, i still prefer Guiness Stout for cold winter night gaming....but, I do want to be accurate!
    So tell me...what did you get for your "Middle Earth Beer"?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    918

    Re: A question for the beer experts

    Quote Originally Posted by Raath View Post
    Is malting usually associated with barley? (For the sugar, like you said) As in, could "malt beer" be similar to a barley beer ( Old Guardian by the Stone brewery, for example) or a barley wine?
    Other grains can be malted. I've made wheat malt before, for example. Malt is made by soaking the grain and allowing it to germinate and begin sprouting. Then it is roasted at low temperature. The malted grain is then ground or cracked for the mash.

    Unless a beer is specified as a wheat beer (or Weizen in German), it is almost certainly made from barley. (Unless it's a ****** American beer like budweiser or coors light, and then it also has rice, high fructose corn syrup, and who knows what else that doesn't belong in beer.)

  13. #13

    Re: A question for the beer experts

    I just saw "Newcastle" and it was like a moth to a light...
    I love that stuff.

  14. #14

    Re: A question for the beer experts

    Hi Gil,
    Yes, I had New Castle Ale for the first time a few weeks back.
    Since, the song from the books the hobbits sing in the Prancing Pony mentions "a beer so brown, the man in the moon himself came down"...
    I would think that and the fact most beer experts I have talked to seem to think New Castle and Old Speckled Hen are the closest to what was served in The Prancing Pony and Green Dragon.
    It is amazing how you have to keep reminding yourself Middle Earth is a fictional world, and not actual earth history...per the way I just realized I stated my response above.
    LOL!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    1,372

    Re: A question for the beer experts

    http://www.jackrussellbrewery.com/beers.html

    if you can find it locally. He does bottle it.

    Olde Ale, Brown and Farmhouse are the most accurate of his brews, although I have yet to have a bad beer from him. The Porter is very, very good too.

    If you are in driving distance of Camino, CA, it is worth a drive. (It looks like the Lone Lands btw!)

    If you are lucky, he has an ale or two "on cask" meaning it is strictly natural CO2 and no Nitrogen boosting. Has to be hand pumped in. Olde Ale on cask is not to be missed!

    Growlers can be had, which is 1/2 gallon in a glass jar... I have two. That allows me to drink one, age the other in the back of the fridge for a couple of weeks.

    Oh, as for Nukey Brown... I suspect they serve that at the Forsaken Inn.

    Strangely, I love beer, but I am allergic to hops. So I seek out low hop beer, which is more accurate for LOTRO as hops was not introduced to England until the 15th Century.
    Last edited by Snow_blind; Jun 08 2009 at 11:51 AM.

  16. #16

    Re: A question for the beer experts

    I think I found a winner:

    "Dominion Oak Barrel Stout", fermented with vanilla beans.

    This covers the argument that fermenting with hops is too modern.
    Now I need to solve the mystery of the above statement existing in combination of the use fo the word "barley" and "Stout" in LOTR and the Hobbit.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    1,372

    Re: A question for the beer experts

    Quote Originally Posted by Chipset View Post
    Hi Gil,

    It is amazing how you have to keep reminding yourself Middle Earth is a fictional world, and not actual earth history...per the way I just realized I stated my response above.
    LOL!
    Not exactly. =)

    Nothing is ever so simple with Tolkien. The story is meant to be a mythical history of western Europe, England in particular.

    So middle earth is earth, in the distant past.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

This form's session has expired. You need to reload the page.

Reload