We have detected that cookies are not enabled on your browser. Please enable cookies to ensure the proper experience.
Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    It's obvious that we nerds love Tolkien, but hopefully none among us think he was perfect. What would you say is your least favorite aspect about his mythology? It can be perceived plot holes, bad dialog, poor character development, whatever.

    For me, it's probably how fathers give their sons similar names (Finrod, Finarfin, Fingolfin, etc). That gave me untold amount of headaches when I was first delving into The Silmarillion. I don't have much bad to say about anything else. Now, if Tolkien didn't also agree that the Valar were totally stupid* giving the race of Men the shaft, that would be my choice. It just pissed me off how the Valar coddeled the Elves and totally threw Men to the wolves, metaphorically and literally. It's like they didn't care.





    * - Specific quote:

    Everybody, including divine spirits under god, makes mistakes in this mythology, and of course the gods made a primary error. Instead of leaving elves and men to find out their way under the guidance of god, they invited the elves because the rebel amongst them, the wicked god Melkor, was alive and devastated a large part of the world.
    They took them back into their paradise in the west to protect them, and so the whole machinery starts from the rebellion of the elves, and therefore, in rebellion of the evil they did in their bursting out from paradise.
    Last edited by Arasilion; Apr 27 2009 at 01:39 AM.
    [charsig=http://lotrosigs.level3.turbine.com/0620500000009263b/01003/signature.png]Arasilion[/charsig]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    1,372

    Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    Actually, I built an Evil Kin character around that very subject about Men getting the shaft.
    Tinwe Morimaite - Elven Hunter - "And the Light of Aman shone in his face"
    Tarlach of Dale - Human Captain - "Now for wrath!"

    "We are the Content"

  3. #3

    Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    the valar didnt give men the shaft. first of all, men are mortal and are unable to set foot in valinor, so the valar had no choice but to let them remain in middle earth. second, they let the elves, both the dark elves and the exiles, as well as men toil in middle earth before intervening. theres no favoritism there.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Rohan
    Posts
    876

    Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    I actually do like the naming systems (and I love the languages, especially Quenya).

    It's a hard choice for me as to what I least like. (How about that there isn't more! heheh). If I had to pick one thing, I'd probably say that what bugs me the most are the gaps. There are many things where we're left wondering. The true origin of orcs is not set in stone. Where did hobbits come from? Who *really* is Tom Bombadil? (that's a fun debate, but I'm almost convinced he's a purposeful enigma).

    Oh, and how there are other lands on the "globe" of Arda that are baaaarely even mentioned.
    Aethelbehrt ~ Captain of Landroval
    Haradwen ~ Warden of Landroval
    Zôraphel ~ Burglar of Landroval

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Real Start Date: Mettarë, 2988 T.A.
    Posts
    1,426

    Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    That there isn't more of it. Or to be slightly less silly about it, that there are many patches that are a little bare and undeveloped. The Fall of Gondolin, the War of Wrath, the War of the Last Alliance, etcetera. The bare spots bug me more than the outright gaps.

    Now, if Tolkien didn't also agree that the Valar were totally stupid* giving the race of Men the shaft, that would be my choice.
    Speaking of Valinorian stupidity, it's always bugged me that the Gift of Death is supposed to be this positive thing in the mythos, and outside the power of the Valar, and yet the Numenorians were rewarded with far longer lifespans at the end of the First Age. I mean, talk about mixed messages--no wonder that little experiment didn't work out too well.
    [CENTER][I][FONT=Garamond]* * *
    [/FONT][/I][FONT=Palatino Linotype]"From without the World, though all things may be forethought in music or foreshown in vision from afar, to those who enter verily into Eä each in its time shall be met at unawares as something new and unforetold."[/FONT]
    [/CENTER]

  6. Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    Speaking of Valinorian stupidity, it's always bugged me that the Gift of Death is supposed to be this positive thing in the mythos, and outside the power of the Valar, and yet the Numenorians were rewarded with far longer lifespans at the end of the First Age. I mean, talk about mixed messages--no wonder that little experiment didn't work out too well.
    Heh, death is something that even the Valar will envy after awhile; but I can understand the confusion over the mixed messages :-) I suppose its something like, just because I'd like to go to Heaven, I'm not preparing to jump off a cliff anytime soon.
    [charsig=http://lotrosigs.level3.turbine.com/0620500000009263b/01003/signature.png]Arasilion[/charsig]

  7. Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    Quote Originally Posted by newwwwb View Post
    the valar didnt give men the shaft. first of all, men are mortal and are unable to set foot in valinor, so the valar had no choice but to let them remain in middle earth. second, they let the elves, both the dark elves and the exiles, as well as men toil in middle earth before intervening. theres no favoritism there.
    I don't mean bringing them to Valinor. Even bringing the Elves there was considered a mistake. I'm talking about there was virtually no guidance for them, no teaching, no protection. The best we got was five Wizards thousands of years after their awakening. One turn to evil, one became a hippy, one got addicted to pipe-weed, and the two others went spelunking in the West. I'm being tongue-in-cheek, of course, but the Valar could have done better.
    [charsig=http://lotrosigs.level3.turbine.com/0620500000009263b/01003/signature.png]Arasilion[/charsig]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Right behind you! Aaah!
    Posts
    2,129

    Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    I'll go along with the names thing -- Lamrod, son of Lamron, nephew of Lanron...

    That said, for the most part I'm fine with the mythology, it's just the good Professor's prose that sometimes gives me fits.

    -The Gneech
    [I]Premium content since 2010.[/I]
    [url=http://www.valarguild.org]Valar Guild: Lore Monkeys and Proud of It[/url]
    [url=http://my.lotro.com/thegneech/][charsig=http://lotrosigs.level3.turbine.com/0520a0000001149ed/01005/signature.png]Honorary Shirriff Maedhroc Thornhollow[/charsig][/url]
    [url=http://www.gneech.com]Gneech.com[/url] - My writing, comics, and art.

  9. #9

    Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    Quote Originally Posted by Arasilion View Post
    I don't mean bringing them to Valinor. Even bringing the Elves there was considered a mistake. I'm talking about there was virtually no guidance for them, no teaching, no protection. The best we got was five Wizards thousands of years after their awakening. One turn to evil, one became a hippy, one got addicted to pipe-weed, and the two others went spelunking in the West. I'm being tongue-in-cheek, of course, but the Valar could have done better.
    i think their dealings with the elves taught the valar not to be overactive in the interference with middle earth. in fact, you could see their lack of interference as a gift to men. they gave men dominion over middle earth.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ohio, where we never have any adventures or do anything unexpected
    Posts
    4,646

    Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    Well, I guess I'm gonna have to throw myself in with those whose only complaint is that there isn't more to read. Just about every other complaint voiced so far I am completely okay with.

    Quote Originally Posted by Arasilion View Post
    For me, it's probably how fathers give their sons similar names (Finrod, Finarfin, Fingolfin, etc).
    I actually really love that aspect of the mythology. I think its neat that names (that is given names as opposed to surnames) themselves can delineate familial relationships.

    I even included this idea in my own hobbit family tree. My hobbit, Reddhawk, whose real name is Redrogo, is son of Trogo, son of Drogo, son of Drago, son of Dagobert, son of Hulbert, son of Hobart, son of Hildebrand, ... etc., etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by newwwwb View Post
    the valar didnt give men the shaft. first of all, men are mortal and are unable to set foot in valinor
    That's only because the Valar banned them from setting foot in Valinor to avoid trouble arising from their mortality and the likelihood of their being envious of the immortal Valar and Eldar.
    Quote Originally Posted by Silmarillion
    But the Lords of Valinor forbade them to sail so far westward that the coasts of Númenor could no longer be seen; and for long the Dúnedain were content, though they did not fully understand the purpose of this ban. But the design of Manwë was that the Númenóreans should not be tempted to seek for the Blessed Realm, nor desire to overpass the limits set to their bliss, becoming enamoured of the immortality of the Valar and the Eldar and the lands where all things endure.
    Quote Originally Posted by Othniel View Post
    Where did hobbits come from?
    Well, their first origins are left a bit murky, but we know that they are an offshoot of men. In fact, Tolkien says as much. Presumably, they descended long ago from the Northmen. The fact that Sméagol's people lived along the Anduin provides proof of this assertion. Even more evidence comes from Merry and Pippin's talk with King Théoden:
    Quote Originally Posted by The Two Towers
    The Riders laughed. 'It cannot be doubted that we witness the meeting of dear friends,' said Théoden. 'So these are the lost ones of your company, Gandalf? The days are fated to be filled with marvels. Already I have seen many since I left my house; and now here before my eyes stand yet another of the folk of legend. Are not these the Halflings, that some among us call the Holbytlan?'

    'Hobbits, if you please, lord,' said Pippin.

    'Hobbits?' said Théoden. 'Your tongue is strangely changed; but the name sounds not unfitting so. Hobbits! No report that I have heard does justice to the truth.'

    Merry bowed; and Pippin got up and bowed low. 'You are gracious, lord; or I hope that I may so take your words,' he said. 'And here is another marvel! I have wandered in many lands, since I left my home, and never till now have I found people that knew any story concerning hobbits.'

    'My people came out of the North long ago,' said Théoden. 'But I will not deceive you: we know no tales about hobbits. All that is said among us is that far away, over many hills and rivers, live the halfling folk that dwell in holes in sand-dunes. But there are no legends of their deeds. for it is said that they do little, and avoid the sight of men, being able to vanish in a twinkling: and they can change their voices to resemble the piping of birds. But it seems that more could be said.'
    Quote Originally Posted by thegneech View Post
    That said, for the most part I'm fine with the mythology, it's just the good Professor's prose that sometimes gives me fits.
    Another thing I absolutely love about Tolkien's writings! Author Terry Pratchet once said that Tolkien's books seem to be more about the world than about the events taking place within it. I can certainly see this, as indeed, Tolkien's tales are rich with description and vivid detail.
    [COLOR=yellowgreen][B]"Pure creation is like a vacation."[/B][/COLOR]
    [INDENT]- Welby of Landroval[/INDENT]

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    449

    Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    My main complaint has always been the incomplete history of the dwarves, both of Durin's folk and the other six houses. I was always most drawn to the dwarves and the fact is that their (supposedly) great history is for the most part glossed over. I understand that the Silmarillion was written to encompass the history of the elves so it makes sense that a race they didnt care to understand is not given a lot of detail, but I do wish that Tolkien would have better fleshed out the dwarves history.
    [charsig=http://lotrosigs.level3.turbine.com/06205000000000dc9/01001/signature.png]Alvis[/charsig]
    Train hard, say your prayers, and eat your vitamins because Alvismania is coming to get you!

  12. #12

    Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    I too regret that we get only partial coverage of the history of only one out of seven of the dwarf houses. Also all the white space off to the north, east and south of the Middle-Earth map. And the two missing wizards (three if you count Radagast, which I almost do).
    [charsig=http://lotrosigs.level3.turbine.com/0820700000004c7c0/signature.png]Golodthir[/charsig]

  13. #13

    Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    I'll post for matter of just posting really. Nothing against Tolkien himself, who was a brilliant ancient language professor.

    I've learned to read and write Norwegian-Germanic Futhark fluently, which incorporates the first use of Eldar Futhark runes into sounds; the prior being the first written language specific to Norway used between 400-550 AD. Took a pretty long time to learn, and has no real use other than an interesting bar trick really these days. Heritage thing I suppose.

    Tolkien used the Eldar set as a base for creating the Cirth runic script of the dwarves, which also utilize a sound basis for each rune but they have a completely different set of sounds for each rune than Norwegian-Germanic Futhark. Throws me for a total loop.

    I commend those who have learned the Cirth (neat thread here on that: http://forums.lotro.com/showthread.php?t=249806), but I feel I don't dare learn it properly because it'll screw with my memory of the proper set when I get older. Not that I'm not getting there, hehe.

    I do wish that Tolkien had kept the sounds similar on the invented runes, since he used 90% of real ones in his Cirth script. That's the beef I guess if I had to make one.
    [B]Magnarr [/B] - Lvl 85 Champion
    Leader, United Races (Vilya server)
    Cofounder and Leader, Vilya Alliance coalition of kinships
    [url]www.UnitedRaces.net[/url] [url]www.VilyaAlliance.com[/url]

  14. #14

    Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    I really would've liked to know more about what happened to the 2 Wizards who we never see, and also more about Radagast.
    Lvl 60 warden, lvl 60 rk, lvl 50 champ, lvl 45 captain, lvl 37 burg, lvl 32 LM, lvl 27 mini.
    R6 WL, r5 reaver, r5 weaver, r4 warg, r4 defiler, r2 BA.
    [COLOR=#808080][I]RIP Nidor of Brandywine, 1970-2012.[/I][/COLOR]

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    3,062

    Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    Mine is that the War of the Ring was so short

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    464

    Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    For me it is the generally waning of power throughout the ages. Start off in the Years of the Trees, and the Elves are at the height of their might (debatable, but I think so). Hit the First Age, the Noldor all have their kingdoms, Doriath in bloom, etc..Come to the end of the First Age, and every single one of those realms is destroyed (Save Cirdan and his Teleri). There have been 5 High Kings of the Noldor. Morgoth has devastated all three Houses of Men. Belegost and Nogrod are all but destroyed, the Silmarils are lost, and most of the remaining Edain are now on Numenor.

    Numenor slowly decays as more and more they question the Valar. Picking up Sauron along the way was just the icing. Oh, lets not forget the sundering of Valinor and the breaking of the world, shall we?

    Then we come to the Third Age. Last Alliance ends, last High King of the Noldor is slain, Arnor declines, Three Kingdoms rise/fall, Gondor wanes, the Dwarves lose Khazad-dum, Sauron comes back, etc. Gondor fights a losing war, Greenwood becomes Mirkwood, Smaug takes Erebor, and the One Ring is found. At the end of the Return of the King, where Imrahil speaks of the final march as a "vanguard" of Gondor's armies in its prime. All that they can muster to challenge the Dark Lord is hardly anything compared to an army at the Last Alliance. Heck the world would have been Sauron's had some Hobbit not gone on a suicide mission (This, however, would be an interesting topic. Would the Valar come back and smack Sauron around? Would Eru leave Men to that fate?)

    The general deline bothers me. Everything fails at some point, but there doesn't seem to be anything to replace it.
    [COLOR="Red"][I][CENTER]Dwoir - 65 - Guardian
    Halfric - 65 - Warden
    Swifty and Hammo - Arkenstone
    [/CENTER][/I][/COLOR]

  17. Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    The general deline bothers me. Everything fails at some point, but there doesn't seem to be anything to replace it.
    That would be true if it wasn't for Iluvatar. While it's not explained in detail, eventually Middle-Earth will be renewed and everything that is bad will be done away with. But in the mean time, it can be depressing.
    [charsig=http://lotrosigs.level3.turbine.com/0620500000009263b/01003/signature.png]Arasilion[/charsig]

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    464

    Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    Quote Originally Posted by Arasilion View Post
    That would be true if it wasn't for Iluvatar. While it's not explained in detail, eventually Middle-Earth will be renewed and everything that is bad will be done away with. But in the mean time, it can be depressing.
    True, but in the mean time, the current scale of decline doesn't leave much hope for those right before the second Music
    [COLOR="Red"][I][CENTER]Dwoir - 65 - Guardian
    Halfric - 65 - Warden
    Swifty and Hammo - Arkenstone
    [/CENTER][/I][/COLOR]

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    587

    Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    I think mostly, as others have stated, I'd like to know more, much more, about the other lands of Middle Earth and the interesting stories about the that got pushed to the wayside.
    ~Officer of the Black Knight Brotherhood (BKB) on Elendilmir~
    ~Herudraug, Hound of Barahish. Rank 4 Warg on Elendilmir~
    [charsig=http://lotrosigs.level3.turbine.com/04208000000001cd8/signature.png]Darron[/charsig]
    Not all those who wander are lost. Just me. Now where did that refrigerator get to?

  20. #20

    Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    For me, it is the behavior of the Valar in relation to the Children of Illuvatar and the lands of Middle-earth in general. My apologies in advance, but this is going to be a really long post. Here is my outline of how things played out:

    1. Illuvatar calls together the Ainur and propounds to them His Themes. They sing and have visions of Arda and many things to come. Illuvatar then speaks a word and causes Arda to be. A number of Valar and Maiar want to go there and be a part of it as stewards of Illuvatar. Great!

    2. The Valar enter Arda and nothing from their vision is there yet - it is essentially a barren rock. Bummer! So they go about their great work of bringing it all to pass. Melkor causes all kinds of trouble and nothing turns out right. Then Tulkas comes to Arda. He kicks Melkor's butt and Melkor flees beyond the bounds of Arda.

    3. The Valar go about fixing things up. They make two tall towers with lamps to give the world light and build themselves a very nice home on the Island of Almaren. They are tired from their labors and have a festival. Tulkas marries Nessa and falls asleep. While the Valar celebrate Melkor sneaks back into Arda with his followers and builds a stronghold called Utumno.

    4. Melkor makes war on the Valar. Among other things he breaks the towers of the lamps and all hell breaks loose. Much of Middle-earth is wrecked including Almaren. The Valar spend a lot of time containing the damage. When they are done, they more or less say "Screw this, Melkor can have Middle-earth". The Valar leave for the extreme west of Arda and build themselves a new dwelling called Valinor with really high mountains to keep Melkor out. They turn Valinor into a literal heaven on earth. Among other things, they create two holy trees to bring light to Valinor (but none of this light reaches Middle-earth).

    5. In fairness, part of the reason the Valar retire to Valinor is because the massive destruction caused by their fights with Melkor makes the Valar worry that the place where the Children of Illuvatar will awaken will be destroyed if they continue to fight Melkor (as if Illuvatar would allow that to happen). So instead of resolving things with Melkor once and for all, they instead decide to cede to him control over the lands where the Children of Illuvatar will awaken (and just what do the Valar think is going to happen when the Children eventually wake up?). For a long age the Valar keep to themselves in Valinor giving Melkor free reign in Middle-earth. Although Orome sometimes visits, Ulmo keeps a hand in here and there, and Manwe sends his eagles to observe from time to time, the Valar essentially do nothing to check Melkor from turning Middle-earth into a place of shadow and fear where creatures of horn and bloody claw arise (I'm paraphrasing). In my mind this is a really shortsighted and foolish course of action.

    6. Eventually the Valar sense that the time for the awakening of the elves is nigh and they decide that they have put off their confrontation with Melkor too long (essentially acknowledging that the confrontation was inevitable). They decide to make war on Melkor, and I am fairly certain this conclusion is reached without the knowledge of exactly where the Elves will arise (and without question in ignorance of where Men lie sleeping). The host of the Valar marches on Utumno. They kick Melkor's *** (again) and bring him in chains back to Valinor where he is judged and thrown into the Void for three ages.

    7. Orome discovers the elves and the Valar invite the elves to come live with them. Many elves take them up on it and go to Valinor, but quite a large number do not and remain in Middle-earth. There is a long time of bliss for the Eldar in Valinor in which they enjoy the beauty of Aman and are taught much of the wisdom of the Valar. However, we are never told whether the Valar do anything to clean up Melkor's mess in Middle-earth or otherwise do anything at all to benefit the elves that didn't go to Valinor (remember, Melkor created a lot of monsters and defiled a lot of land while he was left to his own devices). In particular, we know that the surviving balrogs are still running loose because they come to Morgoth's rescue when he has his falling out with Ungoliant.

    8. Eventually Melkor is let out of the Void and is put on probation. He appears to play nice for a while, but secretly sows the seeds of restlessness and discord among the Eldar, and in particular among the ruling household of the Noldor. During another festival (the Valar didn't learn their lesson the first time apparently), Melkor and Ungoliant destroy the Two Trees. Melkor also slays Finwe and steals the Silmarils. Melkor returns to Middle-earth and takes up his old secondary stronghold of Angband.

    9. While the Valar dither about and weep over the loss of the Trees, Feanor swears a mighty oath to make war on Melkor (who he names Morgoth) until the Silmarils are recovered. Against the counsel of the Valar Feanor leads the majority of the Noldor out of Valinor. When Feanor and his people slay the elves at Alqualonde in order to take their ships, Mandos pronounces his Doom upon the Noldo exiles (those that do not repent and return to Valinor to sue for pardon) and especially the House of Feanor.

    10. Notwithstanding that Morgoth broke his probation, spilled blood in Valinor (Finwe) and destroyed the Two Trees, the Valar DO NOTHING TO PUNISH HIM BUT INSTEAD CHOOSE ONCE MORE TO CEDE MIDDLE EARTH TO HIS DOMINATION. In my opinion this is a completely indefensible abrogation of the responsibilities that the Valar undertook when they came to Arda as the stewards of Illuvatar. While it is true that the House of Feanor and (to a lesser extent) the other Noldor exiles are to be punished for their crimes, how can that serve as the moral ground for the Valar to abandon all the other peoples of Middle-earth to subjugation by Morgoth? What crimes did the Avari commit? What of mankind, not yet awakened in Middle-earth? I understand the notion of permitting the Children of Illuvatar free will, but what meaningful free will can they enjoy while Morgoth, arguably the mightiest of the Valar, exercises dominion over Middle-earth with the express intention of subjugating all to his will? [Aside from the extreme case that you cannot exercise meaningful free will if you are a slave in the pits of Angband (and none at all if you are slain), I think the tale of Turin, where Morgoth causes all of Turin's choices to turn to ill, is particularly illustrative of the extent of this problem.]

    In summary, I can find no satisfactory basis for explaining the inaction of the Valar vis a vis Morgoth after the destruction of the Two Trees if you take as your starting point the notion that the Valar are beneficient "angels" of Illuvatar whose overriding imperative is the selfless furtherance of the happiness and well-being of the Children of Illuvatar.

    End of Part I of my rant. I warn you that there will be a Part II where I address the Valar's further inaction vis a vis Morgoth and, later, Sauron.
    Last edited by Vilnas; May 04 2009 at 09:39 PM.
    [charsig=http://lotrosigs.level3.turbine.com/0920d00000003106c/signature.png]Celedriel[/charsig]

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ohio, where we never have any adventures or do anything unexpected
    Posts
    4,646

    Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    Quote Originally Posted by Vilnas View Post
    In summary, I can find no satisfactory basis for explaining the inaction of the Valar vis a vis Morgoth after the destruction of the Two Trees if you take as your starting point the notion that the Valar are beneficient "angels" of Illuvatar whose overriding imperative is the selfless furtherance of the happiness and well-being of the Children of Illuvatar.
    It seems to me that it was all due to the fact that Manwë believed Melkor would eventually change and renounce his evil ways. Even if the other Valar had wished to stop Melkor, they had to submit to the authority of Manwë *, and he seemingly remained naive ** wherever his brother Melkor was concerned.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Silmarillion
    But fair-seeming were all the words and deeds of Melkor in that time, and both the Valar and the Eldar had profit from his aid and counsel, if they sought it; and therefore in a while he was given leave to go freely about the land, and it seemed to Manwë that the evil of Melkor was cured. For Manwë was free from evil and could not comprehend it, and he knew that in the beginning, in the thought of Ilúvatar, Melkor had been even as he; and he saw not to the depths of Melkor's heart, and did not perceive that all love had departed from him for ever. But Ulmo was not deceived, and Tulkas clenched his hands whenever he saw Melkor his foe go by; for if Tulkas is slow to wrath he is slow also to forget. But they obeyed the judgement of Manwë; for those who will defend authority against rebellion must not themselves rebel.
    [COLOR=yellowgreen][B]"Pure creation is like a vacation."[/B][/COLOR]
    [INDENT]- Welby of Landroval[/INDENT]

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Real Start Date: Mettarë, 2988 T.A.
    Posts
    1,426

    Re: LEAST favorite aspect of the mythology?

    Quote Originally Posted by Vilnas View Post
    ...

    In summary, I can find no satisfactory basis for explaining the inaction of the Valar...
    That the mythology would be rather dull otherwise?
    [CENTER][I][FONT=Garamond]* * *
    [/FONT][/I][FONT=Palatino Linotype]"From without the World, though all things may be forethought in music or foreshown in vision from afar, to those who enter verily into Eä each in its time shall be met at unawares as something new and unforetold."[/FONT]
    [/CENTER]

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

This form's session has expired. You need to reload the page.

Reload